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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 




CHELMSFORD^- 



1991 



•*• 



\* 



IN MEMORIAM 

GEORGE E. BAXENDALE 

Cemetery Department 

CATHERINE R. CURRAN 

Building Department 

MELVIN deJAGER 

Civil Defense Committee 

WILLIAM W. EDGE 

Civil Defense Committee 

Finance Committee 

Park Department 

Superintendent of Public Buildings 

EVELYN M. PHILBROOK 

Office of Board of Assessors 

PETER J. SAULIS 

Board of Health Inspector 



Front Cover: 

Desert Storm Parade on Chelmsford Common. 
Brothers: Steven and Keith Whitney, Chelmsford residents 
and members of Desert Storm armed forces. (Photo by. jean sougnezi 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1991 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government . 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population 1991: 

Assessed Valuation Rate 1990 

Tax Rate: 



United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library .... 



Children's House 



McKay Library 



School Superintendent 
Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk 



Tax Collector & Treasurer 



Veterans' Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. It 

is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, 

and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

31,926-; 

$2,441,218,839 (Real Estate) 

$42,021,530 (Personal Property) 

Flat Rate $12.39 

($12.16 Residential-$13.01 Commercial) 

Chester G. Atkins, Concord, MA 
Lucile C. Hicks, Wayland, MA 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford, MA 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Thursday 1:00 p.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 
Thursday— Closed 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday & Wednesday 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 1:00 p.m. -6:00 p.m. 

Thursday, Friday & Saturday . . .9:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Tuesday in April 
Last Monday in April 
7:00 p.m. -Every other Monday 
7:30 p.m. -Every other Tuesday 
7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wednesday 
7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday 
8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tuesday 
7:00 p.m. -1st Tuesday of Month 
7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday of Month 



9 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




(Front) Dennis J. Ready. Chairman; William R. Logan. Vice Chairman; (Rear) Roger A. Blomgren; Richard 
E. DeFreitas. Clerk; Henrick R. Johnson. Jr. 



In April, 1991 the Board of Selectmen reluctantly said 
goodbye to veterans Bonita Towle and Bradford Emer- 
son, who retired after twelve and seven years on the 
Board, respectively. Board members welcomed new 
members William A. Logan and Richard E. DeFreitas, 
elected in the Town Election on April 2, 1991, a race 
in which there were eight candidates for two seats. 

At the Board's reorganizational meeting on April 4th 
Dennis J. Ready was elected Chairman. Mr. Logan Vice 
Chairman and Mr. DeFreitas Clerk. Members Henrick 
R. Johnson, Jr. and Roger A. Blomgren took the fourth 
and fifth chairs. 

Of major concern during the first half of 1991 on the 
local level was Operation Desert Storm, during which 
American troops were deployed to Saudi Arabia. Forty- 
two Chelmsford residents served in the Armed Forces 
during this conflict, with much support from the 
Townspeople. The theme of the 1991 Fourth of July 
Parade was "Welcome Home," dedicated to the 
veterans of this conflict. 

Other events during 1991 included: the Board voted 
to support no pay raises for Town Employees; they 



voted on 5% Classification in October; a Special Elec- 
tion was held in June with five override questions on 
the ballot. Only the school override passed, with an ad- 
ditional $950,000 being voted to the School Budget. 

The Board accepted with regret the resignation of 
Town Accountant Lorraine Leone and in June ap- 
pointed Bernard W. Meyler, Jr. to this position. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role 
in the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Nor- 
thern Middlesex Council of Governments, the Mid- 
dlesex County Advisory Board and the Massachusetts 
Municipal Association. Individual Selectmen also served 
as liaisons between the Board of Selectmen and various 
town and regional boards and commissions during the 
year. 

Due to the fact that national and state legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board 
of Selectmen maintained regular contact with Congress- 
man Atkins' office as well as with Senator Lucile Hicks 
and State Representative Carol Cleven. The Selectmen 
wish to express their gratitude to Congressman Atkins, 
Senator Hicks and Representative Cleven for their help 



and coooperation during the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens 
of Chelmsford, wish to express their gratitude to the 
various Town boards and committees for their accom- 
plishments during the year. It should be remembered 
that these boards and committees are composed of un- 
paid volunteers who take many long hours out of their 
free time to work on issues and projects that benefit the 
Town of Chelmsford. The Board would also like to 
recognize the competent and dedicated office staff of 
Judith Carter, Marian Currier and Elaine Casey. 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

William R. Logan, Vice Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Clerk 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Roger A. Blomgren 

TOWN MANAGER 

To The Citizens of Chelmsford: 

The year which ended on December 31 , 1991 was dif- 
ficult for the Town of Chelmsford as financial constric- 
tions continued to demand most of the attention of the 
Town administration. The year began with a Town 
Meeting that voted FY91 budget reductions necessitated 
by continued cutbacks in state aid. These budget cuts 
signed into the development and subsequent passage 
of an FY92 budget which included continued service 
reductions including lay offs of personnel including 
police and fire, the closure of the West Fire Station, and 
the elimination of recycling as a tax-based service. Other 
departments also experienced difficulties including In- 
spections Library. D.P.W. and those departments in- 
cluded within Municipal Administration. While the 
School Department also underwent difficult budget 
reductions its problems were eased by the willingness 
of the Townspeople to override Proposition 1 x h by 
S950.000. in order to assist education within the 
community. 

Later in the year the Town Meeting made further 
budget reductions again resulting from reductions in 
state aid. However, most governmental services were 
unscathed during this round of cuts as efficiencies and 
purchasing decisions allowed operating budgets to be 
minimally impacted. It does appear that the Towns 
restructuring and downsizing will bear fruit for FY93 
and beyond as the workforce has been reduced by ap- 
proximately 13% and efficiencies have been realized. 
Both of these factors should allow the Town to weather 
the last part of the regional economic downstream and 
position itself for the future. An additional positive is 
that the Town was able to stabilize its fiscal condition 
without gimmicks that could cost in the future, without 
wholesale determinant of capital needs, and without 
depleting financial reserves. Because of these actions we 
are able to maintain our A-l bond rating while most 
communities nationwide were downgraded. 



1991 also saw the solidifying of changes that began 
with the Town Charter including the hiring of John 
Long as Superintendent for the newly-restructured 
Highway Division of the D.P.W. The announced resig- 
nation of the Finance Director James Doukszewicz and 
Veteran *s Agent Mary McAuliffe in 1992 will impact 
upon the implementation of the newly-structured 
Finance Department Human Services Department. And 
in December of 1991 the Charter required Pesonnel 
Rules and Regulations were adopted by the Personnel 
Board and Town Manager after 18 months of work, 
thereby symbolizing another step forward towards good 
management practices. Another step in this direction 
was the first step in the development of a five year 
budget plan. 

I expect that 1992 will be easier from a financial posi- 
tion as our actions since 1989 have had positive effects. 
However, difficult times will continue for 18-36 months 
thereby requiring vigiliance in our fiscal practices in- 
cluding budget preparation. To this end I hope to work 
with the Board of Selectmen in establishing firm fiscal 
policies which will guide the Town well into the future. 

I also hope in 1992 to continue efforts of reorganiz- 
ing and restructuring for cost savings and/or improved 
service, as well as developing systems that allow for the 
Town to realize similar goals of savings and service. This 
will include greater automation as well as regionaliza- 
tion of services and privatization of certain functions. 
Finally 1992 will require careful negotiations with all 
collective bargaining units as all contracts expire on June 
30, 1992. This timing of negotiations should allow for 
new contracts that are favorable to the overall Town 
government. 

It is clear that much work lies ahead in 1992 and be- 
yond. However, I am fortunate to have highly qualified 
and committed department heads, many good em- 
ployees and volunteers and particularly Judy Carter, 
Marian Currier and Elaine Casey of my office; and ex- 
cellent Selectmen who provide direction and support 
during difficult times. In particular I wish to recognize 
Bonnie Towle-Hahn and Brad Emerson who chose not 
to run for re-election in 1991. I also wish to recognize 
their successors Bill Logan and Dick DeFreitas as well 
as long time members Dennis Ready, Rhodes Johnson 
and Roger Blomgren. I am fortunate as is Chelmsford 
to have such committed individuals working on behalf 
of the betterment of the community. 

Lastly, I wish to recognize and thank the citizenry 
who have given me much support and understand the 
difficulty of bringing change to Chelmsford govern- 
ment. I look forward to working with you and for you 
in the years ahead. 

Sincerely, 

Bernard F. Lynch 

Town Manager 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Richard F. Burtt. Jr. 



VOTERS 

Total Democrats 
Total Republicans 
Total Unenrolled 
Total New Alliance 
Total Libertarian 
Total Ind. Hi Tech 
Total Prohibition 
Total Green Party USA 
Total Socialist 

Total Voters 



Judith A. Olsson 
Chairman 

Man' E. St.Hilaire 
Ex Officio 

Voting strength as of December. 1991 

ENROLLED VOTERS 

PRECINCT 



John F. Ketcham 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


TOTAL 


551 


591 


461 


620 


628 


536 


530 


55 7 


459 


4933 


347 


407 


306 


331 


468 


422 


456 


330 


416 


3483 


1010 


1212 


1150 


941 


1205 


1095 


1245 


1054 


1194 


10106 
































1 











1 














2 








1 


4 


1 


1 


3 


2 





12 





























































































1909 2210 1918 1896 2303 2054 2234 1943 2069 



18536 



TOWN CLERK 

Sporting 

Licenses Dog Licenses Kennel Licenses Recorded Mortgages 



1179 

Births inc. 
365 



2899 

Deaths 

237 



Marriages 

240 



681 

Intentions 

240 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
January 7, 1991 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
PM at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 148 Representative 
Town Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator pointed out the fire exits located 
within the hall. He went over the Town Meeting 
procedures. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 
Selectman Towle then moved that the reading of the 
entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator explained that present in the hall were 
media personnel from a national news broadcasting 
show. He requested that the Representatives take this 
into consideration and conduct themselves according- 
ly and avoid any unnecessary lengthy debate and 
discussions. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Bonita Towle mov- 
ed that the Town vote to approve and confirm the ac- 
tions taken at the October 1, 1990 and October 15, 1990 
sessions of the Fall 1990 Annual Town Meeting, the 
record of which is available for inspection at the office 
of the Town Clerk. 

The Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the 
purpose of the article. This article is to satisfy Bond 
Counsel's concerns of the posting of the warrant for the 
October meeeting. The Town by-law and Charter both 
considered the October meeting as an annual meeting 
therefore the posting of the warrant was done seven 
days prior to the meeting date. Bond Counsel con- 
sidered the meeting a special meeting according to NGL 
Chap 39 Sec 9, which would require a posting date of 
fourteen days prior to a meeting. Mr. Lynch asked for 
passage of this article so the business acted upon can 
be ratified, there are articles within this warrant which 
will address the concerns expressed at the December 
17th meeting. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Town Treasurer James 
Doukszewicz, moved to withdraw this article. Due to 
the passage of article 1 , there was no need to act upon 
this article. The Finance Committee supported the mo- 
tion to withdraw. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Barry Balan, Chairman of the 
Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to 



transfer and appropriate the sum of $550,000.00 from 
sewer betterments, special revenue, to reduce the ex- 
empt portion of debt and interest for Fiscal Year 1992. 

Barry Balan explained the article. This article is to 
reaffirm the Sewer Commission's position on the use 
of the Sewer betterment fees. The fees are included in 
the formula being used to offset the costs for the reduc- 
tion of future construction bonds. The Finance Com- 
mittee supported the article. 

Ronald Gamache questioned why this article was put 
before article four, which was the petitioned article sub- 
mitted for calling this special meeting. He felt that if 
this article passes then it will jeopardize the funding 
which would be necessary for article four. According 
to the Report the Fiscal Policy Advisory Committee 
made at the June 1990 meeting, the Committee and the 
Town Manager recommended that these fees be applied 
to the operating budget of Town Government. The 
Town Manager explained that was indeed the recom- 
mendation, but after further discussion with people who 
live in the Town, the Sewer Commission and others in- 
volved from the start of the sewer project, the fees 
should be applied for the purpose of retiring debt. 
Ronald Gamache moved to table the article. He felt dis- 
cussion and vote on article four and the other upcom- 
ing articles which intend to be funded with the better- 
ment fees, should be acted upon first. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. Scott McCaig 
expressed tht the betterment fees should only be ap- 
plied towards sewer projects. Bernard Ready asked for 
support of the article. A discussion took place. Mark 
Gauthier moved the question. The Moderator attemp- 
ted a unanimous voice vote. Hearing none the follow- 
ing tellers came forward and a hand count was taken, 
which requires a 2 A's vote: 



Dorothy Frawley 
Jean Horgan 



Patricia Plank 
Mike McCall 



Result of the hand count: Yes 138, No. 2, %'s is 93 mo- 
tion carried. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on 
the article, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Ronald Gamache moved that 
the Town transfer and appropriate from the sewer bet- 
terment fund the sum of $110,000.00 to line item 8: 
Public Safety Salary account. 

Ronald Gamache explained the article. He stated that 
in 1990 in just court reimbursements alone, $189,749.50 
has been returned to free cash. He felt that the Police 
Department has supported the town with revenues and 
cited over amounts that have been returned to the 
general fund, over the years. The crime situation is not 
going to change. It will go higher especially once the 
criminal element becomes aware of the decrease in man- 
power. Public Safety is an area which cannot afford to 
have any further reductions. Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch explained he is fully aware of the revenues that 
the department generates. When that budget is drawn 



up predictions are estimated on the receipts that will 
be turned in by the Police Department. This is also done 
with other departments, Selectman Bonita Towle, mov- 
ed to amend the motion by deleting "transfer and ap- 
propriate from sewer betterment fund the sum of 
$110,000.00 and substitute "transfer from line item 16: 
Snow and Ice Account the sum of $55,000.00" to Line 
item 8 Public Safety Salary Account. She explained that 
there was surplus money available in this account and 
that the money would be used to rehire the three 
patrolmen until June 30th. Dwight Hayward of the 
Finance Committee spoke against the motion. Only 
because the weather conditions so far haven't merited 
much use of this account, that is why there is a surplus. 
This account could end up being overdrawn which will 
be paid for at the beginning of the next fiscal year. He 
listed what had been appropriated and actually spent 
over the past years. If this is done in effect it would be 
like an override because this is the only account that 
is exempt and allowed to be overdrawn. Edward 
Hilliard said that if Proposition 1 l h is going to be over- 
ridden the it should be done so by way of a ballot vote, 
not by overdrawing an account. A discussion took place. 
Selectman Ready said it was a case of establishing 
priorities, and that Public Safety must be a priority. 
Town Manager Bernard Lynch spoke against the mo- 
tion, he felt that already there has been a storm and 
there was certainly going to be more before the winter 
was over. More lengthy discussion took place. Bill 
Dalton wanted to know what would the guarantee be, 
if this body did in fact vote the funds needed to reinstate 
the three officers, that this would be carried out? Ber- 
nard Lynch stated that if that is what the majority voted 
then he would do so. Selectman Roger Blomgren 
presented areas where he felt cuts could be made in 
order to raise the money. Kay Roberts expressed her 
concerns but said that the Town Meeting Represen- 
tatives should be fiscally responsible. Janet Dubner 
moved the question. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. He then asked for 
a voice vote on the motion to amend, motion defeated. 
Ronald Gamache then moved to transfer the sum of 
$55,000.00 from the Finance Committee's reserve fund 
to reinstate the three police officers currently laid off. 
The Finance Committee was not in favor of this mo- 
tion, Dwight Hayward asked for Town Counsel's opi- 
nion on the motion. James Harrington, Town Counsel 
said that the Town Meeting Body could in fact vote to 
take money from this account. Dwight Hayward ex- 
plained that this account is used for emergency items 
that have not been budgeted for the year, and that the 
money should not be taken for this type of funding. A 
discussion took place. A number of representatives 
spoke for and against the motion. Susan Koeckhaven 
moved the question. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. He then asked for 
a voice vote on the motion to amend , motion defeated . 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article, mo- 
tion defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 5 Wendy Marcks, Chairman of 
the School Committee moved to withdraw the article 
due to the lack of available funds. The Finance Com- 
mittee supported the motion to withdraw. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Janet Hendl, Chairman of the 
Library Trustees, moved to withdraw the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Fire Chief Robert L. Hughes, 
moved to withdraw the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
explained that this action was needed in order to clarify 
the Charter, Town By-Law, and State law on the Town's 
Annual Meeting dates of April and October. The 
Town's Charter and By-law calls for two annual 
meetings in a calendar year. The State law only allows 
one annual meeting, any other meeting is to be con- 
sidered a special meeting which has special re- 
quirements for posting a warrant. This action would 
allow the Town to have two annual meetings in a year 
once the necessary procedures are accomplished. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the Town vote 
pursuant to MGL Chapter 43B, to amend the 
Chelmsford Home Rule Charter as follows: 

1. By deleting paragraph (a) Time of Meeting of Sec- 
tion 2-12 Procedures in its entirety and inserting in its 
place the following: 

(a) Time of Meeting 

The representative town meeting shall meet at least 
twice each calendar year. These two meetings shall con- 
stitute the Annual Town Meeting of the town and shall 
be held in two sessions to be known as the Spring An- 
nual Town Meeting and the Fall Annual Town Meeting. 
Each session of the Annual Town Meeting shall be call- 
ed by separate warrant. The Spring Annual Town 
Meeting shall be held in April on a date fixed by by- 
law and shall include the election of town officers and 
other matters to be determined by ballots and is ex- 
pected to be primarily concerned with the determina- 
tion of matters involving the expenditure and commit- 
ment of town funds, including but not limited to the 
adoption of annual operating budget for all town 
agencies. 

The Fall Annual Town Meeting shall be held in Oc- 
tober on a date fixed by by-law and shall be deemed 
to have all the powers of an Annual Town Meeting ex- 
cept that it shall not be construed to include the time 
for the election of town officers and other matters to 



be determined by ballot. The Selectmen shall insert in 
the warrants for both sessions of the Annual Town 
Meeting all subjects the insertion of which shall be re- 
quested of them in writing by ten or more registered 
voters of the Town, in the manner provided under the 
laws of the Commonwealth. 

The Board of Selectmen may, in any manner provid- 
ed under the laws of the Commonwealth or the charter, 
for the purpose of acting upon the legislative business 
of the town in an orderly and expeditious manner, call 
the Town Meeting into session at other times by the 
issuance of warrants therefor. 

Ronald Gamache moved to reconsider article 4. He 
explained the purpose of his request. He cited a bank 
robbery that took place in town and his own personal 
experience with it. He felt that there was money 
available in free cash due to a recent appelate tax court 
settlement. The unemployment benefit line item could 
be reduced. The three police positions are needed in 
order to maintain town services, and public safety. A 
discussion took place. Robert Sexton moved the ques- 
tion to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to stop debate, motion carried, 
unanimously. . He then asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to reconsider, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Bonita Towle mov- 
ed that the Town vote to accept the following mention- 
ed street, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and 
shown by their reports duly filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk: 

1. Natalie Road 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with 
the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and sub- 
ject to the withholding of any remaining bonds until 
such requirements have been met; and moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to ac- 
quire any and all temporary and/or permanent 
easements, and any property in fee simple, with trees 
thereon, by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, 
for the purpose of securing traffic safety and road im- 
provements: and moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and ex- 
ecute all necessary and proper contracts and agreements 
thereto. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article, 
seeing that there was no money involved, he asked for 
support of the article. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

A discussion took place concerning the need to recess 
in order for the Town Meeting Representatives to caucus 
by precinct and vote for one member to represent his 
or her precinct on the rules committee. It was men- 
tioned in the literature to the representatives that this 
action take place at the conclusion of article 1 , in order 



to avoid confusion at the end of the meeting. The 
Moderator asked for an opinion by way of a show of 
hands on the issue. Motion defeated, the represen- 
tatives will caucus at the conclusion of meeting after ar- 
ticle 13. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Bonita Towle 
moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$5,000.00 from the Insurance Sinking Fund to General 
Government Expenses, Line Item -2. 

Town Manager explained that this was a standard ar- 
ticle. The figure was the required insurance deductible 
which has come due. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Fire Chief Robert L. Hughes 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 148 Section 261, 
a statute regulating the installation of automatic 
sprinkler systems in new or rehabilitated multi-unit 
residential structures. 

Deputy Chief James Sousa explained the article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Fire Chief Robert L. Hughes 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 148 Section 26H, 
a statute regulating the installation of automatic 
sprinkler systems in lodging or boarding houses. 

Deputy Chief James Sousa gave a description of what 
constitutes a boarding house and explained the article. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. Ed- 
ward Hilliard questioned the amount of boarding 
houses in Chelmsford? Deputy Sousa answered to his 
knowledge only one. Motion carried, unanimously. 

A discussion took place again concerning the in- 
dividual precinct's needs to caucus to fill the Rules Com- 
mittee positions. It was felt that representatives will 
leave the hall. The Moderator explained that he hopes 
full participation would take place and that the 
representatives stay at the conclusion of the meeting 
and fulfill their requirements. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 David McLachlan moved that 
the Town vote to amend Article XI General Wetlands 
By-law of the General By-laws as follows: 

1. Under Section 1. Application, by adding the 
following sentence: The Commission may waive the 50 
foot construction prohibition contained herein where 
the Commission specifically finds that literal enforce- 
ment of the prohibition would involve substantial hard- 
ship, financial of otherwise to an applicant and that 
desirable relief may be granted without substantial 
detriment to the public good and without nullifying or 
substantially derogating from the intent or purpose of 
this by-law. 



James McBride, Chairman of the Conservation Com- 
mission, explained that the Board felt after the passage 
of article 15 at the October 15, 1990 Town Meeting 
which also amended section 1 , they should amend the 
by-law again to include a clause in case of hardship. 
Since the passage in October two hardship cases have 
appealed to the Conservation Commission and the 
Board felt that a need is there for waiving the by-law 
from time to time without a person having to appeal 
through the court system. That is the purpose of the 
wording that now appears. The Finance Committee 
recommended that article. 

A discussion took place. John Emerson moved the 
question. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 



tion carried to move the question. Before asking for a 
voice vote on the article, he reminded the Represen- 
tatives to stay at the conclusion of this meeting and 
caucus. The first meeting of the Rules Committee will 
be held on January 23rd at the Town Offices at 7:30 
PM. He then asked for a voice vote on article 13, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

Mark Gauthier moved to adjourn the meeting, mo- 
tion carried. The Meeting adjourned at 10:05 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



10 



WARRANT FOR 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 2, 1991 and APRIL 29, 1991 

MIDDLESEX, SS 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling 
places, VIZ: 

Precinct 1 . Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Precinct 2. Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 3. Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 4. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafeteria 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 8. McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9. Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 2nd day of April, 1991, being the 
first Tuesday in the said month, from 12:00 noon until 
8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 



To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years. 

One Member of School Committee for three 

years 

Two Members of Public Library Trustees for 

three years 

One Member of the Board of Health for three 

years 

Three Planning Board Members for three years 

One Member of Housing Authority for five years 

One Member of Sewer Commission for three 

years 

One Member of the Cemetery Commission for 

three years 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 19th day of March, A.D. 
1991. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

OF TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Bonita A. Towle, Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



11 



TOWN ELECTION APRIL 2, 1991 



('indicates Candidates for Re-election) 
OFFICES AND CANDIDATES 





Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


TOTAL 


SELECTMAN 3 Year Term (2) 






















Blanks 


164 


138 


136 


153 


138 


177 


146 


154 


116 


1322 


Joseph M. Erbacher 


24 


24 


30 


43 


43 


32 


30 


37 


48 


311 


Barry B. Balan 


231 


127 


189 


146 


197 


211 


208 


154 


205 


1668 


W. Matthew Whiting 


53 


53 


49 


83 


70 


64 


65 


55 


57 


549 


Rose A. Sergi 


108 


178 


91 


130 


119 


128 


97 


154 


105 


1110 


Richard E. DeFreitas 


229 


241 


244 


362 


275 


253 


282 


245 


236 


2367 


Ronald W. Wetmore 


93 


125 


99 


92 


180 


110 


97 


103 


70 


969 


William R. Logan 


307 


212 


279 


221 


279 


343 


343 


277 


254 


2515 


Peter V. Lawlor 


172 


138 


250 


195 


238 


338 


310 


190 


173 


2004 


Write-in 








2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 





13 


Misc. 








1 




















1 


TOTAL 


1381 


1236 


1370 


1428 


1542 


1658 


1580 


1370 


1264 


12829 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 3 Year Term 






















Blanks 


54 


47 


47 


43 


29 


63 


40 


52 


31 


406 


Cheryl M. Warshafsky 


261 


279 


243 


307 


248 


304 


241 


306 


244 


2433 


Barbara H. Ward" 


376 


287 


394 


363 


491 


460 


508 


327 


357 


3563 


Write-In 





2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 








8 


Misc. 





3 








2 














5 


TOTAL 


691 


618 


685 


714 


771 


829 


790 


685 


632 


6415 


LIBRARY TRUSTEE 3 Year Term (2) 






















Blanks 


473 


427 


467 


484 


558 


560 


543 


498 


440 


4450 


Kay E. Roberts 


344 


258 


322 


367 


365 


401 


350 


315 


283 


3005 


James E. Decker 


241 


179 


222 


259 


268 


317 


335 


222 


217 


2260 


Nanch J. Knight 


322 


371 


356 


317 


350 


380 


352 


334 


321 


3103 


Write-In 





1 


3 





1 








1 


1 


7 


Misc. 


1 








1 














2 


4 


TOTAL 


1381 


1236 


1370 


1428 


1542 


1658 


1580 


1370 


1264 


12829 


BOARD OF HEALTH 3 Year Term 






















Blanks 


222 


208 


217 


224 


299 


270 


266 


218 


249 


2173 


Paul F. McCarthy" 


467 


407 


466 


487 


471 


557 


522 


463 


379 


4219 


Write-In 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


4 


3 


17 


Misc. 


1 


2 


1 


1 














1 


6 


TOTAL 


691 


618 


685 


714 


771 


829 


790 


685 


632 


6415 


PLANNING BOARD 3 Year Term (3) 






















Blanks 


652 


618 


639 


695 


719 


727 


742 


658 


608 


6058 


Norma H. VonFricken 


226 


217 


199 


222 


249 


241 


225 


236 


198 


2013 


Kim J. MacKenzie* 


386 


321 


378 


386 


441 


490 


463 


378 


335 


3578 


James P. Good* 


416 


319 


401 


431 


479 


530 


472 


401 


396 


3845 


Christine A. Gleason' 


392 


376 


434 


406 


424 


498 


466 


381 


353 


3730 


Write-In 


1 


1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


10 


Misc. 





2 


3 


2 














4 


11 


TOTAL 


2073 


1854 


2055 


2142 


2313 


2487 


2370 


2055 


1896 


19245 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 Year Term 






















Blanks 


242 


207 


237 


230 


279 


291 


299 


212 


276 


2273 


William P. Keohane' 


447 


409 


446 


483 


491 


536 


491 


472 


352 


4127 


Write-In 


1 








1 


1 


2 





1 


3 


9 


Misc. 


1 


2 


2 

















1 


6 


TOTAL 


691 


618 


685 


714 


771 


829 


790 


685 


632 


6415 



12 



SEWER COMMISSION 3 Year Term 

Blanks 246 180 238 225 305 290 295 220 256 2255 

George F. Abely 442 436 444 488 465 536 494 463 374 4142 

Write-in 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 10 

Misc. 2 1 2 1 2 8 

TOTAL 691 618 685 714 771 829 790 685 632 6415 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 3 Year Term 

Blanks 248 185 225 212 303 274 282 221 254 

Everett V. Olsen* 440 433 456 500 468 553 507 463 375 

Write-In 10 4 10 2 13 

Misc. 2 1 1 

TOTAL 691 618 685 714 771 829 790 685 632 



2204 

4195 

12 

_4 

6415 



QUESTION 1 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 



91 

510 

90 

691 



74 
477 
_67 

618 



58 

559 

68 

685 



75 
537 
102 

714 



81 
604 
_86 

771 



104 

634 

91 

829 



72 
636 
_82 

790 



85 
503 
_97 

685 



69 

492 

71 

632 



709 

4952 

754 

6415 



REPRESENTATIVE TOWN MEETING MEMBERS 3 Year Term (unless 


specified) 






PREC. 1 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 2 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 3 (6) 


TOTAL 


Blanks 


1931 


Blanks 


1625 


Blanks 


1886 


Richard P. McClure' 


378 


Milton H. Kinney Jr. 


376 


Ann Y. Graham 


379 


Joel M. Karp 


375 


Karen S. Vandenbulke* 


323 


Thomas J. Welch' 


385 


Jean B. Rook* 


344 


Marc A. Vandenbulke' 


309 


Pamela S. Amway' 


353 


Martha McClure' 


363 


Jeffrey W. Stallard' 


341 


Michael F. McCall 


400 


Robert M. Schneider' 


338 


Mary Jo Welch' 


355 


Robert D Marazzi' 


333 


William E. Spence' 


398 


Albert Leman' 


367 


Thomas E. Moran' 


366 


Write-In 


7 


Write-in 


8 


Write-in 


3 


Misc. 


12 


Misc. 


3 


Misc. 


5 


TOTAL 


4146 


TOTAL 


3707 


TOTAL 


4110 


PREC. 1 (1) 






Unexpired 2 Year Term 


TOTAL 










Blanks 


266 










David A. MacDonald 


423 










Write-In 


1 










Misc. 


1 










TOTAL 


691 










PREC. 4 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 5 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 6 (6) 


TOTAL 


Blanks 


1927 


Blanks 


1827 


Blanks 


2401 


Daniel J. Sullivan III* 


411 


Robert E. Brooks* 


438 


David W. Foner 


396 


Kay E. Robert' 


398 


Patricia Wojtas 


379 


James A. Sousa' 


438 


Steven B. Hadley' 


390 


W. Allen Thomas Jr.* 


397 


Patrick J. Calnan 


432 


Donald P. Ayer' 


382 


Jonathan A. Stevens' 


440 


Howard J. Hall* 


415 


Michael R. Parquette' 


376 


Catherine R. Brown' 


430 


Mary E. Frantz' 


451 


Beverly A. Koltookian" 


394 


Steven J. Temple' 


397 


Earl C. Burt* 


420 


Write-In 


2 


JohnR. Hibbardjr.' 


314 


Write-In 


20 


Misc. 


4 


Write-in 


4 


Misc. 


1 


TOTAL 


4284 


Misc. 
TOTAL 



4626 


TOTAL 


4974 



13 



PREC. 7 16) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 8 i6i 


TOTAL 


PREC. 9 16' 


TOTAL 


Blanks 


2218 


Blanks 


1678 


Blanks 


1861 


Paul F. Gleason 


442 


Bruce J. Harper' 


429 


Phyllis M. Elias 


358 


Margaret A. Schloeman' 


393 


Christopher T. Garrahan 


419 


Frank R. Peterson' 


312 


Frederick W. Wikander' 


446 


Alexander W. Gervais" 


386 


Edward A. Cady' 


308 


Thomas E. Mills' ' 


403 


Samuel Poulten' 


235 


Allan T. Galpin Jr.' 


318 


Carol A. Stark' 


403 


Evelyn P. Bell' 


386 


Cynthia J. Kaplan' 


307 


Linda G. Morabito' 


429 


Peter G. Johnson' 


401 


Joseph M. Erbacher 


313 


Write-In 


6 


Gail E. Poulten 


166 


Write-in 


5 


Misc. 





Write-in 


10 


Misc. 


10 


TOTAL 


4740 


Misc. 
TOTAL 




4110 


TOTAL 


3792 




PREC. 9'1' 












Unexpired 1 Year Term 


TOTAL 










Blanks 


244 










Charles A. Piper 


388 










Write-in 












Misc 












TOTAL 


632 



14 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 29. 1991 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:36 
PM at the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium, by the 
Moderator. Dennis E. McHugh. The Moderator recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum, there were 157 
Representative Town Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator acknowledged the students present 
who had participated in the Student Government Day 
activities held on Thursday. April 25th. He read the list 
of students and the office that thev held for the dav: 



Selectman: 
Jennifer Kalos 
Eric Pearson 
Karen Ready 
Manjula Sastry 
Frank Soracco 

Board of Health: 
Miranda McXally 
Kathleen Morris 
Lindsay St. Onge 

Sewer Commission: 
Dave Flynn 
Galit Goldshmid 
Michael Sablone 

Town Constable: 
Kristen Kiddler 

Cemetery Commission: 
Linda Tanini 
Man' Sullivan 
Lauren Young 

Town Moderator: 
Jennifer Scutt 

Town Accountant: 
Erin Hovt 



Housing Authority: 
Edward Morris 
Tom Killman 
Christina House 

School Committee: 
Amy Hiltz 
Patti Lee 

Lucien Labrecque 
Stephanie MacDougall 
Donna Sartz. Chairman 

Planning Board: 
Andy Booth 
Dean Kelly 

State Senator: 
Richard Burn 

Library Trustee: 
Becky Cox 
Mary Schmidt 

Superintendent of Streets: 
Clair Curley 

DPW/Town Engineer: 
Louise Chen 

Cemetery Superintendent: 
Kevin Dalev 



Police Chief: 
Mark Trainor 

Ass't Police Chief: 
Christine Roffallo 

Fire Chief: 
Brian Bell 

Ass't. Fire Chief: 
Erin O' Sullivan 

Supt. of Schools: 
Kelly Wolfgang 

Council on Aging Dir. 
Catherine Theohary 

Veteran s Agent: 
Stacey Shepard 

Town Clerk: 
Lori Sandler 

Board of Assessors: 
Karen Boss 
Andria Mitsakos 
Sara Siliander 



Wiring Inspector: 
David Egdall 

Building Inspector: 
Michelle Brissette 

Supt. of Public Bldg: 
Kate Nocivelli 

Town Manager: 
Erin Ready 

Finance Committee: 
Noel Dulac 
Christine Egan 
Cheryl Michallyszyn 

Treas./Tax Collector 
Chris Zaher 

State Representative 
Rachel De Young 



15 



Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 
Selectman Ready moved that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. It was so voted unanimously. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence in 
memory of William < Bill. Bumpa 1 Edge, who passed 
away on April 18th. Bill was a past member of the 
Finance Committee, and served on numerous commit- 
tees and boards. 

The Moderator then asked for the body to grant per- 
mission for two non-residents to address the Town 
Meeting during the budget and article discussion. Direc- 
tor of the Library. Man' Mahoney. and Business Man- 
ager of the School Department. Sylvester Ingeme. Mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town 
Officers and Committees. 

The Moderator asked David McLachlan. Chairman 
of the Rules Committee to present the Committee's 
report. David McLachlan came forward and read the 
committee's report. 

Chelmsford Rules Committee Report 

The Rules Committee was convened at the request of 
the Town Meeting Representatives. An election by each 
precinct to select a representative was conducted and 
nine members were chosen 'at the STM of January 7. 
199L. The Rules Committee decided that its purpose 
was to consider and recommend guideline and protocol 
which will encourage an efficient and productive Town 
Meeting that allows an informed, intelligent and full 
discussion of the issues at hand. This report consist of 
recommendations to be adopted by the Town Meeting 
Representatives i ' "TMR's" ' . Once adopted some recom- 
mendations may need to be included as changes to the 
Town's By-laws. 

Recommendations to the Town Meeting 

1. Town Meeting Management 

1 . 1 Timing 

1.1.1 Meetings will start promptly at the time 
posted. 

1.1.2 Dates and times of Town Meeting 'TM "*) 
continuances will be announced when the 
warrant is posted. 

1.1.3 No warrant article may be introduced after 1 1 
p.m.— unless the TMR's vote to do so. 

1.2 Physical layout of TM 



1.2.1 A location other than the McCarthy 
Auditorium should be used in order to allow 
for more room for TMR's to get up to speak 
and for better lighting. 

1.2.2 Selectmen. Town Manager. Town Financial. 
Director. Town Counsel and other experts 
needed by those individuals sit together, on 
the left or right of the hall. 

1.2.3 Finance Committee sits on the opposite side 
from the Selectmen. 

1.2.4 Center area is reserved for the sponsor and 
speakers of a warrant article. 

1.2.5 First row of the hall or row adjacent to the 
microphone is reserved for speakers. 

1.2.6 A section for the print media will be set aside. 
Cable 43 commentators will be located off the 
stage, or away from the discussion. Video and 
print media should not be allowed to interfere 
with the TM process or speakers and will be 
controlled by the Moderator. 

1.3 Lobbying 

1.3.1 The distribution of material and lobbying on 
warrant articles or other non-TM issues will 
be prohibited outside of the building housing 
the meeting. An area will be established in- 
side the building but outside the meeting place 
where one individual for each side of an issue 
can distribute material orN#iscuss the issue. 
Handout material should be dated and sign- 
ed by the organization. 

2 Town Meeting Vote and Accountability 

2.1 Voice votes will not be used. An initial vote 
on an article will be made by hand with col- 
ored tickets. The Moderator will visually judge 
the vote and if in doubt will ask for a specific 
count. 

2.2 Roll Call Vote 

2.2.1 A request for a roll call vote may be made by 
40 TMR's anytime after the Moderator ends 
debate on the main motion and before the 
next article is considered. 

2.2.2 A roll call vote is made in sequential order of 
precincts and alphabetically with the precinct. 

2.2.3 The Town Clerk reads the name of the TMR. 
The TMR votes. "Yea. Nay or Present. " No 
response is recorded as Not voting. The Town 
Clerk reads back the name and vote. 



16 



2.2.4 At the conclusion of the vote the Town 
Moderator asks is anyone wishes to vote who 
didn't and if anyone wishes to change a vote. 
The inquiry is made in order by precinct. 

2.3 Town Meeting Warrant Presentation and 
Discussion 

3.1. Warrant articles must show name of the 
sponsor. 

3.2. When Town property and assets are to be pur- 
chased or sold, the name of the purchaser or 
seller, if known, must be disclosed by the 
sponsor. 

3.3. The sponsor of a warrant article must speak 
initially to the article. 

3.4 Zoning By-Law proposals must show clearly 
a map denoting existing zoning and proposed 
zoning, including definitions of zones and ex- 
planation of changes. 

3.5 All By-law language changes must show the 
language of the existing By-law. the language 
of th change, and an explanation of the 
change. 

3.6 Financial articles must show the following: 
dollars for the past two years and the current 
year: proposed budget dollars: and the 
revenue generated by the department re- 
questing the budget. 

3.7 View graphs must be large enough to be view- 
ed from the back of the hall or handouts 
should be distributed. 

3.8 The Moderator will allow a question and 
answer period of the sponsor of an article to 
gather factual information or understanding 
of the article. Debate of the article is not 
allowed at this time. 

3.9 The Selectmen and Finance Committee must 
be asked their position on each article, and 
are encouraged to state their reasons for their 
position. The Finance Committee is not re- 
quired to speak on a nonfinancial article. 

3.10 Debate 

3.10.1 There should be no limit on the length of time 
someone may speak but speakers are en- 
couraged to be brief. 

3.10.2 The Moderator is encouraged to forbid 
political speeches from candidates: deviation 
from the issue: and repetition by the speaker. 



3.10.3 No person may speak a second time until 
everyone has had an opportunity to speak 
unless through the use of a "point of infor- 
mation" by a previous speaker who wishes to 
contradict or dispute a factual statement. 

3.10.4 The Moderator is encouraged to sense the 
tenor of the discussion. If all speakers are on 
the same side of the issue the Moderator 
should interrupt and ask is there are oppos- 
ing opinions. If none he should ask the body 
if they wish to vote. 

3.11 Rules should be published in each warrant. 

The Moderator asked if there were any questions con- 
cerning the Rules Committee report as presented. Ed- 
ward Hilliard spoke in favor of the report, he felt that 
the Committee did a commendable job and hoped that 
the body would accept the report. The question was 
raised on when would the effective date be of this 
report? The Moderator explained that once the report 
is presented and voted to accept as presented then that 
date is the effective date. If this report is accepted then 
he intended to begin to incorporate the suggested rules 
and regulations starting at this meeting, he will get to- 
gether with Town Counsel and decide which ones 
should be considered actual by-laws. Cheryl Warshaf- 
sky asked how to go about objecting to a particular rule. 
The Moderator explained that she should get in touch 
with the committee representative from her precinct or 
Town Counsel, or himself. If any of these rules do be- 
come by-laws then any objections or discussion can be 
done at the meeting that they will be voted on. Brad 
Emerson moved that the report be accepted as pre- 
sented. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried. Selectman Ready explained that based on the 
Town Meeting Representatives vote, the Board of 
Selectmen along with Town Counsel and the Moderator 
will go over the report and present the necessary by- 
law changes at the October Town Meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Frank R. Peterson. Cemetery 
Superintendent moved that the Town vote to transfer 
the sum of SI 8. 000. 00 from the Sale of Graves and Lots 
to the Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund. 

Frank Peterson explained the article. Finance Com- 
mittee and the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the town vote to authorize the Town Trea- 
surer to enter into compensatory balance agreements, 
during Fiscal Year 1992, as permitted by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 53F. 

Selectman Ready explained that this would allow the 
Treasurer to determine which bank to put the Town's 



17 



accounts in. Some banks offer different services, and 
this would allow him to make the choice that would be 
more beneficial to the Town. The Finance Committee 
supported the article. The Moderator asked if there was 
any more questions, or need for discussion? Hearing 
none he asked for a vote by show of hands, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1992, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws. 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17 
and 17(a). 

Selectman Ready moved to withdraw the article. He 
explained that there has been some changes in the law 
and this article is no longer required. The Moderator 
asked if there was any more questions, or need for 
discussion? Hearing none he asked for a vote by show 
of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of SI, 555. 20 with which to meet bills for previous 
years. 

Selectman Ready explained that this amount due in 
the settlement of a firefighters arbitration case, that the 
Town lost. He read some excerpts from the case. The 
union members were charged with excessive use of sick 
time during the week of March 5th through March 12, 
the Fire Chief decided not to fill all the positions, 
because he felt that the sicknesses were not real. Even 
though the union was under contract negotiations at 
the time, there was no evidence that the union was 
responsible for the abusive sick leave claim. 

The Finance Committee support the article. Joseph 
Erbacher questioned what would happen if the Town 
did not pay the required amount. Selectman Ready ex- 
plained tht because it is a settlement of an arbitration 
judgment the Town could be taken back into court and 
find the union in favor and force the payment of 
$1,555.20 plus any penalties. A %'s vote is required. The 
Moderator attempted an unanimous vote, receiving 
none he asked the following tellers to come forward and 
conduct a hand count: 

Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plan, Jean Horgan, Nor- 
man LeBrecque. Results: Yes 136 No 3— %'s is 93, mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $22,500.00 to engage a private accounting firm 
to prepar an audit of all accounts in all departments in 
the Town of Chelmsford. 



Selectman Ready explained that this is done each 
year. David McLachlan requested that the results are 
published in the local papers, in order for the Town 
Meeting Representatives be aware of the recommenda- 
tions. The Finance Committee recommended the arti- 
cle. The Moderator asked for the vote by a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Robert Joyce, Vice Chairman 
of the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote 
to transfer the sum of $750,000.00 from sewer account, 
special revenue, to reduce the exempt portion of debt 
and interest in the Fiscal Year 1992 Budget. 

Robert Joyce explained that the betterment funds will 
be used to defray the cost of the sewer bonds. This is 
the same article that the Commission supported last 
year. A discussion took place. The Finance Committee 
and the Board of Selectmen supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for the vote by a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 The Moderator explained that 
the following article is the budget for fiscal period from 
July 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992. The Town Manager, Ber- 
nard Lynch would address the Town Meeting Body at 
this time. 

The Town Manager first gave a list and explanation 
of changes to be made to the balanced budget figures: 



Balanced Budget— Expenditures 



Line Item 

1. Municipal Admin. Salary 

8. Public Safety Salaries 

9. Public Safety Expenses 

25. Comm Services Salary 

26. Comm Services Expenses 

TOTAL 
Balanced Budget Receipts 



Alternative Budget Receipts 



Sewer Betterment Revenue 



Conservation Commission Revenue 



Orig. Amt. 

S 768.951 

5.218.276 

415.196 

178,563 

97,300 



Receipt 

Solid Waste 



Receipt 

Solid Waste 



Amend Revised 

S -3.725 S 765.226 

-103.755 5.114.521 

-9.850 405.346 

+ 114.721 293.284 

+9.850 107,150 

+7.241 



Original 

1.403.000 



Original 

1.200.000 



Revised 

1.442.200 



Revised 

1,256.200 



Original Revised 

1,081.947 1.300.000 



Original 

3,655 



Revied 

-0- 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch then gave a presenta- 
tion. He explained that the balance budget provides ser- 
vice cutbacks in many town departments. Five areas will 
be seeking alternative budgets, seeking Proposition 2 1 /? 
override. The town simply does not have the funds to 
provide the services and governmental structures that 



18 



have existed in the past. Revenues are well down by 
a half a million dollars. The fixed costs continue to go 
up. trash, salaries, debt, retirement. Its distasteful not 
at all enjoyable to have to lay off personnel, cut pro- 
grams, but there are no objectives, it's a question of 
priorities. The override request will be 2.1 million 
dollars, this will still call for service cut backs. He is try- 
ing to implement in house projects, via payroll, tax bills 
etc. in order to save expenses. That is why there is an 
alternative budget via override passage. The people can 
decide what level of services and level of taxation they 
want. 

The Moderator asked the Finance Committee for their 
comments. Chairman. Dwight Hayward asked the 
Town Meeting Representatives to address the level 
funded/balanced budget figures in order to have a 
budget in place for July 1st. so that the services can con- 
tinue. This is what is available in revenues, then the 
body can go onto the alternative budgets where the 
body can deal with the precede problems. 

The Moderator then explained the procedure he was 
going to use going through the budget. He would name 
the line item which applies to the category and read the 
numbers going down the specific category. At this point 
any and all amendments and discussion is to take place. 
No final vote will be taken until the end. There will ac- 
tually be two votes, one for the balanced budget figure 
and one for the alternative budget. He then explained 
the procedure for amending the figures, and proceeded 
to read the budget figures. 

He read the Municipal Administration category and 
its total figures, then read the specific category beginn- 
ing with the Executive Office, Town Manager/Select- 
men, where a question was asked concerning the 
salaries. He continued to read the figures asking for 
questions at the end of each budget. A question was 
asked about data processing expense. It was explained 
tht this is the cost of the Assessor's data processing con- 
tract. He read down to the Elections Budget where the 
question was raised by Robert Joyce, about the election 
hours of 12 noon to 8:00 PM. Is there money in the 
budget for the hours to be returned to 7AM to 8PM. 
Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
budget did include those hours but due to budget cut- 
backs this year, the hours were reduced. The Selectmen 
each year set the hours for a Town Election. The 
Moderator continued to read to the Finance Commit- 
tee, where the question was raised about the Salary 
amount. It was explained that this is for the part time 
clerical help that is used mostly during the budget 
review time of the year, which is when the Finance 
Committee meets. The Moderator read on to the Law 
Department. Bill Dalton questioned the figure of 
$100,000. He wanted to know if this was a realistic 
figure. Past figures have been far higher. Bernard Lynch 
explained that those past figures were the costs of 
negotiations. He continued to read down to the Com- 
munity Development/NMCOG line item. What was this 



department? It was explained that this is the depart- 
ment that the Traffic and Safety Commission uses for 
traffic survey's and information for development. The 
Moderator continued to read asking for questions after 
each department. Under the Education Category, under 
the Nashoba Valley Tech. the question was raised on 
what effects the budget cuts are having on those 
students? The Chelmsford High students are having 
programs cut and fees are being paid in order to par- 
ticipate in athletic programs. Bernard Nystrom, 
Superintendent of Nashoba Tech came forth and 
answered the question. The Moderator asked permis- 
sion from the body allowing Bernard Nystrom a non- 
resident, to speak, it was so voted. Bernard Nystrom 
asked for a point of order, according to state statute, 
the regional superintendent is allowed to speak at any 
and all Town Meetings in his region. It was so noted. 
Bernard Nystrom explained that the Technical High 
School has indeed cut their budget. He explained what 
the future cuts may be. A question was raised about the 
Chelmsford School Budget. Dr. Richard Moser explain- 
ed that the different unions within the School Depart- 
ment jurisdiction had reached compatible agreements 
regarding their contracts. It was questioned about 
where the Town stood with the other Town unions. Ber- 
nard Lynch said no agreements had been reached. The 
Moderator continued to read under the Public Safe- 
ty/Police Department, Chief McKeon started to explain 
why he requested the figures in the alternative budget. 
The Moderator asked him to wait until after the balance 
budget discussion and vote has taken place. He con- 
tinued reading, asking the questions and need for 
discussion. Under the Public Works category. Solid 
Waste, a discussion took place. Joseph Erbacher mov- 
ed to reduce this budget by S186.000.00 For a total 
figure of SI, 256, 200. 00. He explained the purpose of 
this amendment The Selectmen oppose the amend- 
ment. The Finance Committee oppose the amendment. 
A discussion took place, a number of representatives 
spoke in favor and against the motion. Barry Balan mov- 
ed to amend the motion to read SI 75. 000. 00. This 
would eliminate recycling, leaf collection and keep in 
the mini-bin recycling. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen were against the motion to amend. 
Barbara Scavezze of the Solid Waste Committee ex- 
plained that the present contract for recycling includ- 
ed door to door pick-up. Next year the contract will 
be up for renewal and the costs will most likely increase, 
the amount shown is the monies needed for this year's 
contract. More discussion took place. Concerns were 
made about the Federal mandate beginning in 1992 
regarding mandatory recycling. Fran McDougall mov- 
ed the question. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to stop debate, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on Barry Balan 's motion to amend. Motion defeated. 
The Moderator asked if there was any discussion on 
Joseph Erbacher' s motion to amend. Joel Karp moved 
the question. Motion carried, unanimously by a show 
of hands. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to amend, motion defeated. The Moderator 



19 



asked for any need of further discussion, hearing none 
he continued reading the budget line items from Sewer 
Division to the Library budget. A question was asked 
if the Library met the requirements needed to be ac- 
credited. Director Mary Mahoney said that the re- 
quirements were not met, and that she would have to 
apply for a waiver. Under the Undistributed Ex- 
penses/Insurance (liability) Dwight Hayward, Chairman 
of the Finance Committee moved to amend the total 
Line item to be 54,500,082. This would be a reduction 
in the figure shown, and said that the Committee 
recommended the figure, because the costs for certain 
insurance should decrease. When the Moderator asked 
for the Board of Selectmen's recommendation, there 
was no recommendation one way or the other at this 
time. A discussion took place. The Town Manager was 
optimistic about the possibility of savings. After listen- 
ing to the Finance Committee's further explanation, the 
Board of Selectmen recommended the motion to 
amend. The Moderator asked for a voice vote by show 
of hands, motion carried. Under the Employee benefits 
budget. Edward Cady questioned the County Retire- 
ment line item. Bernard Lynh explained that this is the 
Town's portion of the retirement monies for all Town 
Employees and non-Teacher Employees of the School 
System. Bill Dalton questioned the Unemployment 
figure. It was explained the estimated amount could be 
between S60-70.000.00 if there are any monies left then 
it will be returned to free cash. The Moderator asked 
if there was any further discussion, hearing none he 
continued reading. He read the Debt and Interest 
category and then the Total Operating Budget of 
$42,804,529.00. 

A discussion took place concerning the procedure of 
voting the balanced budget as presented. If the meeting 
was to adjourn, the Moderator was concerned about 
the two required votes. He felt that the budget appeared 
under one warrant article. He is aware of other monies 
being slated for presentation concerning the alternate 
budget figures. Town Counsel James Harrington ex- 
plained, if this figure is voted tonight then once the 
meeting is adjourned then the figures under the bal- 
anced budget cannot be changed, however, the other 
monies (alternate budget figures) can be discussed, 
changed and voted on at the next scheduled meeting. 
The Moderator felt that a motion should be made to 
divide the question, or adjourn the meeting and con- 
tinue the discussion and take the votes at another ses- 
sion, or continue this meeting and discuss the alternate 
budget figures, and vote. A discussion took place. 
Selectman Ready explained that the Board of Selectmen 
wanted to complete the budget and vote the final figures 
in order to call a Special Town Election as soon as possi- 
ble concerning the alternate budget figures, which will 
appear on the ballot as override questions. And mov- 
ed to adjourn the meeting until Tuesday, April 30. 1991. 
7:30 PM at the McCarthy Gymnasium. More discussion 
took place concerning the need to vote the balance 
budget figure prior to the adjournment. John Coppinger 
moved to adjourn the meeting until Wednesday, May 



1st. at 7:30 PM at the McCarthy Gymnasium. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were 
against the motion to adjourn to Wednesday. Jeffrey 
Stallard moved the question. The Moderator asked for 
a show of hands, motion carried to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion 
to adjourn to Wednesday. May 1st. Motion defeated. 
Grace Dunn tried to address the body. The Moderator 
ruled her out of order because she was not addressing 
the issue on adjournment. He then asked for a show 
of hands on the motion to adjourn to Tuesday. April 
30th. motion carried. The meeting adjourned at 11:20 
PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh. 
Moderator 



Mary T E. St.Hilaire. 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 30, 1991 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:31 PM at the McCarthy Middle School Gym- 
nasium, by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. The 
Moderator recognized the presence of a quorum, there 
were 153 Representative Town Meeting Members 
present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 con't. The Moderator ex- 
plained that he has before him a procedural motion 
from Selectman Dennis Ready. He read the Motion. 
Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the question under 
Article 8 be divided as follows: 

First: To entertain a motion to raise and ap- 

propriate a certain sum of money to defray 
Town charges as recommended by the Town 
Manager representing a balanced budget. 

Second: To entertain one or more separate motions 
to raise and appropriate certain sums of 
money to defray Town charges contingent 
upon passage of a referendum question or 
questions under Paragraph (g) of Section 58 
of the General Laws. 

The Moderator explained that this will divide the vote 
taken under this article. One vote will be the balanced 
budget figure, and the other will be the vote for the 
alternate budget figure, which will eventually become 
the override questions. The Finance Committee is in 
favor of the motion. The Moderator asked for any dis- 
cussion, hearing none he asked for a vote by a show 
of hands, motion carried. 



20 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved to add the fol- 
lowing sentence to the end of the wording of the first 
part of the divided question: "Such costs may be off- 
set by the estimated receipts from the fees charged to 
users of services as set forth in the budget.'" Bernard 
Lynch then explained the budget figure to be voted on: 



PUBLIC WORKS: 

12. Salary 



Total Operating Budget 
Reduces by Offset Receipts: 

Solid Waste 

Sewer Fees 

Recreation Fees 

Reduced bv Special Revenue 
Art 3 STM 1/7/91 
Art 7 ATM 4/29/91 



$44,143,729.00 

1.441.200.00 

337.459.00 

33.360.00 

42.330.7120.00 

550.000.00 
750.000.00 

41.030.710.00 



He answered questions from the floor, concerning the 
motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
by a show of hands, motion carried. Joel Karp moved 
the question to stop any further debate under its balanc- 
ed budget. The Moderator asked for a show of hands. 
an unanimous or : /3S vote is needed. The Chair was in 
doubt, the following tellers were called to come forward 
and conduct a hand count: 



Dorothy Frawley 
Lucy Simonian 



Patricia Plank 
Jean Horgan 



Result of the hand count: Yes 103 No 28— %'s is 88 
motion carried. The Moderator then read the motion: 
Bernard Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of S4 1.030. 7 10. 00 to defray Town 
charges for the fiscal period from July 1st, 1991 to June 
30, 1992. He asked for a vote by a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. The Budget figures are as follows: 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

1 . Salary 

2. Expenses 

3. Out-of -State 

4. Outlay 

5. Legal Services 

Total General Government 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 

6. Total Budget 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHO 

7. Total Town Assessment 



PUBLIC SAFETY: 

8. Salary 

9. Expense 

10. Out-of-State 

11. Outlay 33.001 

Total Public Safetv 5.556.368 



13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 



Expense 
Out-of-State 
Outlay 
Snow and Ice 



Total Public Works 

SEWER COMMISSION: 

17. Salary 

18. Expense 

19. Out-of-State 

20. Outlay 

Total Sewer Commission 

CEMETERY COMMISSION: 

21. Salary 

22. Expense 

23. Out-of-State 

24. Outlay 

Total Cemetery Commission 

COMMUNITY SERVICES: 

25. Salary 

26. Expense 

27. Out-of-State 

28. Outlay 

Total Community Service 

LIBRARY: 

29. Salary 

30. Expense 

31. Out-of-State 

32. Outlay 

Total Library 

UNDISTRIBUTED EXPENSE: 

33. Total 



S 765.226 
305.830 


DEBT AND INTEREST: 


801 
2.504 


34. Principal 

35. Interest 


30.000 


Total Debt & Interest 


1.104.361 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


21.347.676 


Reduced by Offset Receipts: 
Solid Waste Fees 


L: 


Sewer Fees 


492.945 


Recreation Fees 


5.114.521 


Reduced bv Special Revenue: 
Article 3 STM 1-7-91 


405.346 


Article 7 ATM 4-29-91 


3.500 


TOTAL RAISE AND APPROPRIATE 



905,489 

2,396.685 



2.002 

350.000 

3.654.176 




47.065 

1 


47.066 



115.420 

24.591 

500 

5.200 

145.711 



293.284 

107.150 





400.434 



443.847 

163.239 

500 

1 

607.587 



4.500.082 

4.190.000 
2.097.323 

6.287.323 
44.143.729 



1.442.200 

337459 

33.360 

42.330710 

550.000 
750.000 

41.030.710 



21 



UNDER ARTICLE 8A Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the sum of $950,000.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated contingent on the passage of a referendum 
question under paragraph (g) of M.G.L. Chapter 59 Sec- 
tion 21 (c) said sum to be added to the sum appropriated 
to Line Item #6 School Department Total Budget under 
Article 8 of the 1991 Annual Town Meeting. 

Superintendent of Schools Dr. Richard Moser gave a 
presentation explaining the cuts that were made and 
showed the areas that the staff of the School Depart- 
ment took certain reductions in. Judy Mallette, Chair- 
man of the School Committee gave the committee's 
comments and asked for support of an override ques- 
tion which would reflect the alternate budget figure of 
$22,776,587.00. The Finance Committee supports the 
alternate budget request. The Selectmen support the op- 
portunity for the question to appear on the ballot. A 
lengthy discussion took place. Lorraine Lambert spoke 
about the cuts being made in the school library depart- 
ments. Bill Dalton questioned the legal counsel fees, 
between the school and the town, over $200,000.00 has 
been spent and felt the need for a savings should be 
addressed. Roger Blomgren moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
which left the Chair in doubt. The tellers came forward 
and conducted a hand count. Yes 114 No 25— %'s 83 
motion carried. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the article, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8B Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the sum of $150,000.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated contingent on the passage of referendum 
question under paragraph (g) of M.G.L. Chapter 59 Sec- 
tion 21 (c) said sum to be added to the sum appropriated 
to Line Item #8 Public Safety Salary under Article 8 of 
the 1991 Annual Town Meeting for the Police Depart- 
ment Salary Account. 

The Moderator explained that there would be two 
Public Safety articles, this one is for the Police Depart- 
ment, and another one will be for the Fire Department. 
Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article, 
this is to keep the staff at the current fiscal year 91 level 
of officers. A lengthy discussion took place. Questions 
were asked concerning the number of officers available 
on each shift, the number of cruisers and marked cars. 
Roger Blomgren moved the question, the Moderator 
ruled him out of order. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended an override for Public Safety but at a reduced 
amount. Dwight Hayward moved to reduce the original 
sum by $57,000.00 which would give a total figure of 
$93,000.00. The Committee said this amount 
represented a minus of the 3% salary increase that is 
due to the union employees on July 1st. The Board of 
Selectmen were against the motion to amend. More dis- 
cussion took place. Grace Dunn, president of the 
Federation of Teachers Union read a statement concer- 
ning the way the non-school unions were handled dur- 
ing proposed contract re-negotiations. It was not fair 
to compare the school unions personnel with the town 



unions. Roland Linstad, president of the Police Union, 
spoke against the motion to amend. A number of Town 
Meeting Representatives spoke for and against the mo- 
tion. Roger Blomgren moved the question. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the mo- 
tion to amend, motion defeated. Brad Emerson moved 
the question to stop further debate under the main mo- 
tion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8C Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the sum of $307,000.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated contingent on the passage of referendum 
question paragraph (g) of M.G.L. Chapter 59 Section 
21 (c) said sum to be added to the sum appropriated 
to Line Item #8 Public Safety Salary under Article 8 of 
the 1991 Annual Town Meeting for the Fire Department 
Salary Account. 

Town Manager explained that this was to keep the staff 
at the current level of services. If the question did not 
pass on the ballot then eight firefighters would be laid 
off and services cut. He felt the voters should decide 
the issue. A number of questions were asked concern- 
ing the staff and actual cuts to be made. Chief Robert 
Hughes explained that the eight men would be laid off 
and that the West Fire Station would be closed. This 
station could be covered by the other surrounding sta- 
tions, however the response time would be increased 
from the present two minutes to at least five minutes 
or more . The Finance Committee said that they had 
planned to propose a similar 3% reduced figure like in 
the Police Department, however, they felt that the same 
result would happen and will not amend the article, but 
the Committee is in favor of this being an override ques- 
tion. The Board of Selectmen are in favor of this arti- 
cle, it is an attempt to maintain level of services. Brad 
Emerson moved the question. The Moderator attemp- 
ted an unanimous show of hands, the tellers came for- 
ward and conducted a hand count. Results: Yes 124 No 
3—85 is %'s the motion carried to stop debate. The 
Moderator then asked for a show of hands on the arti- 
cle. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8D Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch requested that this be tabled due to the possibi- 
lity of lengthy debate, and take up the Library article. 
The Moderator felt that because the articles were all 
under the same motion, he would just move on to the 
Library article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8E Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the sum of $13,083.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated contingent on the passage of a referendum 
question under paragraph (g) of the M.G.L. Chapter 
59 Section 21 (c) said sum to be added to the sum ap- 
propriated to Line Item #30 Library. 



22 



Bernard Lynch explained that this article and the 
other Library article to be voted upon is the same as 
all the other requests, this article would maintain the 
present level of services. Sarah Warner, chairman of the 
Library explained the Trustees position. Mary 
Mahoney, director of the Library told the Represen- 
tatives about the current staff and what would be 
eliminated if this override fails. Elizabeth McCarthy, 
Library Trustee wanted to combine this article and the 
other Library article together. The total monies re- 
quested amount would be the same, however, it would 
be dispersed differently than presently shown. The 
Trustees would put more money under the expense line 
item in order to purchase additional books, and the 
salary amount would be reduced by the same amount. 
It would all be appearing under one article. Susan 
Koeckhoven, president of the Friends of the Library ask- 
ed for support of this override. A discussion took place. 
The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
supported the proposed amendment. The Moderator 
read the proposed amendment: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the sum 
of $96,655.00 be raised and appropriated contingent on 
the passage of a referendum question under paragraph 
(g) of M.G.L. Chapter 59 Section 21 (c) said sum to be 
added to the sum appropriated to Line items in the 
Library under Article 8 of the 1991 Annual Town 
Meeting as follows: Line Item 29 Library Salaries 
$66 , 1 76 . 00 . Line item 30 Library Expenses $30 , 489 . 00 . 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the mo- 
tion to amend the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 
He then asked for a hand vote on the article as amend- 
ed, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8E As a result of the previous 
article being amended and voted to include this arti- 
cle, the Moderator asked for a show of hands to 
withdraw this article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8D Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the sum of $197,500.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated contingent on the passage of a referendum 
question under paragraph (g) of M.G.L. Chapter 59 Sec- 
tion 21 (c) said sum to be added to the sum appropriated 
to Line Item #13, Public Works Expense under Article 
8 of the 1991 Annual Town Meeting. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. 
Barry Balan questioned the recycling program and the 
salary being paid. A lengthy discussion took place, 
where a number of Representatives spoke for and 
against the article. The Board of Selectmen were against 
the article. Barry Balan discussed having two override 
questions one for the trash contract and one for the 
recycling program. More lengthy discussion took place. 
Scott McCaig made a motion to adjourn to Wednesday, 
May 1, 1991, 7:30 PM to the McCarthy Gymnasium. 
The Moderator explained that all previous action voted 
at this meeting would be intact. The only discussion that 
could take place and amended or changed would be this 



particular article and any articles after. The Finance 
Committee and Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
motion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. The meeting adjourned at 11:20 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 1, 1991 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:30 PM at the McCarthy Middle School Gym- 
nasium, by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. The 
Moderator recognized the presence of a quorum, there 
were 141 Representative Town Meeting Members 
present. 

James Harrington. Town Counsel made a point of 
order. He wanted the Town Meeting Representatives 
and the general public in attendance, to realize that it 
is his opinion that a motion of any kind can only be 
made by a Town Meeting Representative. The Town 
Manager is only allowed to make motions concerning 
the budget. If any non-Town Meeting Representative 
attempts to make a motion, they will be ruled out of 
order by the Moderator. 

The Moderator reminded the Town Meeting body 
that the discussion was to continue at Article 8D the 
Public Work figure for the alternate budget. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8D Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved to amend the article to be $203,500.00. 
This figure is to include the S6.000.00 cost for drop off 
bin for the multi-family households for this year. The 
multi-family households are presently not included in 
the door to door pick-up of the bi-weekly recycling pro- 
gram. The drop off point would be possibly at the High- 
way Garage. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of 
the motion to amend. The Finance Committee was 
against the motion to amend. Edward Hilliard moved 
to amend the article to read $766,000.00. The Finance 
Committee was against this motion to amend. A ma- 
jority of the Board of Selectmen were against the mo- 
tion to amend. A discussion took place. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion to amend, mo- 
tion defeated. Robert Joyce moved to amend the mo- 
tion to have a figure of SI, 6 18. 034. 00. This would be 
the amount needed for a weekly solid waste pick up. 
He had another motion to make a separate override 
question for the recycling program. A discussion took 
place, a number of Representatives were for and against 



23 



the amendment. Fran McDougall moved the question 
to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion to amend, 
defeated. Sue Olsen felt that the $6,000.00 should be 
eliminated and wanted the figure back to the original 
amount. She felt that the system and site for the multi- 
family drop off point hadn't been well presented to the 
neighborhood involved. Bernard Lynch assured her that 
the plan had been greatly improved. Arrangements will 
be made with the vendor to drop off a bin on a Friday 
afternoon and will be picked up Monday morning. This 
will give the public access on Saturdays to drop off their 
recyclable materials. More discussion took place. 
Ronald Wetmore moved the question to stop debate. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend the article by increas- 
ing it S6.000.00 for a total figure of S203.000.00. The 
Chair was left in doubt, the following tellers came for- 
ward and conducted a hand count: 

Dorothy Frawley. Patricia Plank. Lucy Simonian. Jean 
Horgan. Result: Yes 83 No 48— motion carried to 
amend. Ronald Wetmore moved the question to stop 
any further debate. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator than asked for a show of hands on the main 
motion as amended, motion carried. The article reads 
as follows: 

Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the sum of 
$203,000.00 be raised and appropriated contingent on 
the passage of a referendum question under paragraph 
(g) of M.G.L. Chapter 59 Section 21 (c) said sum to be 
added to the sum appropriated to Line Item #13. Public 
Work Expense under Article 8 of the 1991 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Barry Bell wanted to know what the date would be 
of the Special Election? Selectman Dennis Ready said 
Tuesday. June 4th. The Board of Selectmen at their next 
scheduled meeting of May 6th will vote to put the ques- 
tions on the ballot. Samuel Poulten began discussing 
the balanced budget and alternate budgets alternatives 
and wanted to know if the Town Meeting body sup- 
ported these budgets and to what degree. The 
Moderator ruled him out of order because Mr. Poulten 
wasn't asking any questions, he just kept making 
statements, and began to read Article 9. Bill Dalton ask- 
ed for a point of order. He said that the Board of Select- 
men said they intended to put all of the alternate budget 
articles on the ballot as override questions, why was it 
necessary to have a vote on this process. Dennis Ready 
explained that the Board of Selectmen had indeed com- 
mitted the board to allowing the alternate budgets to 
appear on the ballot. However, since then the Board 
has changed and there are two new members who were 
not involved with the prior commitment. The Board of 
Selectmen must decide what will appear on the ballot 
and in what format. Barbara Ward stated that at least 
three of the current Board of Selectmen had commit- 



ted their vote in writing to the School Committee about 
having a question on the ballot concerning the School 
Department's alternate budget figure. Samuel Poulten 
wanted to know if the Town Meeting Body could vote 
to have the Board of Selectmen place the altenative 
budgets on the ballot as override questions. The 
Moderator advised him to put his proposal in writing 
so Town Counsel could review it. before an further 
discussion was to take place. While this motion was be- 
ing drawn up and reviewed, the Moderator made the 
following announcement. It had been suggested by 
Robert Joyce to make some type of acknowledgement 
concerning the Desert Storm/Desert Shield troops ser- 
ving in the Gulf. The Moderator publicly thanked Mike 
Kinney and Sandy Kilburn for all their efforts made in 
support of the Town's citizens who were the other war- 
riors. He read a list of names and thanked the known 
thirty-eight service personnel involved with the war: 



Thomas Bell 
Jason Jennings 
Michael Metheny 
Keith Whitney 
Michael Russo 
Lincoln Clark III 
George Puccierelli 
John MacDonald 
Thomas McCarthy 
George McLain 
Neil Shea 
Charles Swanson 
William Walters 



Jason Dunn 
James Paisley 
Christian White 
Ernest Sparages 
Thomas Keaney 
Jeffrey Cappiello 
Kenneth Demers 
Paul Dulchinos 
Patrick Ferguson 
Philip Smith 
Michael Robey 
Bruce A. Costa 
James H. Golden. 



Jr. 



Richard Hallion 
Douglas Degeis 
Steven Whitney 
Andrew LoPilato 
Daniel Manley. Jr. 
Rodney Gower 
Gregg Hilliard 
David Spang 
Marc Pare 
Michael Silva 
Michael Rothwell 
Joseph MacShane 



The Town Meeting body acknowledged the announce- 
ment with a standing ovation. 

The Moderator then read the following motion: 
Samuel Poulten moved that the Town Meeting request 
that the Chelmsford Board of Selectmen vote to place 
all alternative budgets as voted by Town Meeting on 
a ballot as soon as possible. 

He then asked the Finance Committee for their 
recommendation. The Finance Committee said they 
didn't have a recommendation one way or the other 
on this particular motion, however, they do support the 
override questions. Selectman Dennis Ready said that 
the Board was in favor of the motion. The Moderator 
asked for a vote on the motion by a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Dennis Ready moved that the 
article be amended as follows: Under School Depart- 
ment Projects, item "South Row Exterior Doors" 
should have a cost of $28,400.00 and not $48,400.00 
The new Article total is $665,524.00 not $685,524.00. 
The amount to be borrowed is now $620,524.00 and not 
$640,524.00. Selectman Ready explained that this is a 
yearly article, and if there were any questions, the 
Chairman of the Committee, James Doukszewicz would 
answer them. Robert Joyce questioned the actual need 



24 



for some of the items, and were they real emergency 
items. Mr. Doukszewicz explained that all the items are 
thoroughly discussed and voted on at their public hear- 
ing, and any item that appears on the warrant article 
is felt to have a definite need. A lengthy discussion took 
place concerning the purchase of cruisers. James Greska 
explained that the original request was for four cruisers, 
the Department was granted three. The cruisers build 
up mileage very quickly and are moved along 
throughout the shifts, until they can no longer be us- 
ed. James Doukszewicz explained that the cruisers are 
paid for from the stabilization fund, no bond is taken 
out on them. David McLachlan questioned where the 
new sidewalks were going to be. The Sidewalks Plann- 
ing Engineering line item is not necesary for new 
sidewalks, it is also for repairing of the present sidewalk 
areas which are determined to be in need. The 
Moderator asked for the different committees recom- 
mendation. The Finance and the Selectmen were in 
favor of the motion to amend. He then asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried. Robert Joyce 
then moved to amend the article by including only the 
Police Cruisers line item. He felt that there wasn"t a just 
emergency stated for the other items. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen were bit in favor 
of the motion to amend. Jeffrey Stallard apologized for 
his outburst the previous night, and spoke against the 
motion to amend. Philip Currier moved the question 
to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. He then asked for a vote on the 
motion to amend, motion defeated, by show of hands. 
Scott McCaig moved the question to stop any further 
debate on the article as amended. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 
He then asked for a vote on the article as amended, by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 
The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the Town vote 
to appropriate the sum of S665.524 for the following 
capital projects: 

FY92 CAPITAL BUDGET 



Traffic and Safety 



School Paint Work 

Sidewalk Planning/Engineering 

TOTAL 



10,000 
75,000 



$665,524 



Fire Department 


Rescue Equipment/ 






Breathing Apparatus 


$ 28.000 




Engine #2 Generator 


20.000 


Dept. of Public Works 


Road Resurfacing 


250.000 




Drainage Projects 


100.000 




One Ton Truck 


30.000 


Cemetery Department 


Backhoe 


45,000 


Police Department 


3 Cruisers 


45.000 


School Department 


Truck w/Plow 


17.874 




Roof Work at H.S. 


31.643 




Cafeteria 






Roof Work at Parker 


10,607 




H/S McCarthy Lavatory 






Partition Work 


10.000 




Emergency Hardware 






for Doors 


12.000 




So. Row Exterior Doors 


28.400 



and moved that the Town vote to transfer and ap- 
propriate the sum of $45,000 from stabilization fund, 
and borrow the sum of S620.524 to fund these 
obligations. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Dwight M. Hayward. Chair- 
man of the Finance Committee moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $200,000.00 
to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the 
Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws. 
Chapter 40. Section 6. 

Chairman of the Finance Committee, Dwight Hay- 
ward explained the article and asked for support. The 
Moderator asked for a hand vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $20,000.00 for the purpose of funding the sand 
lease approved by the town under Article 12 of the 1989 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Selectman Ready explained that this is the fee re- 
quired to maintain the yearly lease for the sand that is 
removed from this area. The Moderator asked for a 
hand vote, motion carried, unanimusly. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Susan Gates of the Mobile 
Home Rent Control Road, moved that the town vote 
to amend the General By-Laws by deleting Article XII 
Mobile Home Park Rent Control By-Laws in its 

entirety. 

Chairman of the Rent Control Board, Susan Gates ex- 
plained that the owner and the tenants had entered a 
long-term thirty year lease and that there was no need 
for the Board to exist any longer, the only jurisdiction 
the board has is to hear eviction notices and that costs 
the town money, this can be done through the court 
system, she asked for support of the article. Viola Stone 
a resident of the park, spoke against the motion to 
delete this by-law. She felt that if a problem with the 
owner occurred the tenants still needed to have 
something to fall back on. James Harrington, Town 
Counsel explained the special legislation was voted 
years ago for the Town of Chelmsford , which enabled 
the town to have a mobile home rent control by-law. 
The legislation will still be in tact, because of the court 
decision and lease agreement. If there becomes a pro- 
blem, then the by-law can be reinstated. He felt that 
if it was necessary to keep the by-law then he would 
advise the Town to do so. At this point he feels that 
the Town has no need to keep this by-law on the books. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried. 



25 



UNDER ARTICLE 13 Town Counsel James Harr- 
ington explained that he had requested the Planning 
Board to put this article on the warrant because the cur- 
rent zoning by-law doesn't allow political signs. This 
has been deemed by the courts system as being un- 
constitutional. A by-law can't restrict the existence of 
political signs, however, it can restrict within reason the 
size. At the required public hearing changes were 
recommended and they are being put forth as an 
amendment to the article. The Moderator read the 
amendment: Thomas E. Firth Jr. moved to amend the 
motion under Article 13 as follows: 

1. Under Section 3326 and 3337 by deleting the 
words "One Temporary, political sign, not ex- 
ceeding four (4) square feet in area" inserting and 
in their place the following words "Temporary, 
freestanding political signs, not exceeding in ag- 
gregate twenty-four (24) square feet in area. 

2. Under Sections 3326 and 3337 by deleting the 
words "within the front yard area of the proper- 
ty" and inserting in their place the following 
words "within the front or side yard area of the 
property. 

A discussion took pace. Barbara Ward was concerned 
about the restriction of front yard. Some businesses do 
not have a front yard and felt that the wording was 
restricting placement of any signs in a business area that 
didn't have a front yard. A number of other Represen- 
tatives spoke for and against the article. Kim MacKen- 
zie, Chairman of the Planning Board read the Board's 
recommendation . 

' 'The Planning Board, held a Public Hearing on March 
13, 1991, and voted at the Planning Board meeting of 
April 10, 1991 to recommend approval of Article 13 as 
amended, (7-0) for the April 1991 Town Meeting." 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
More discussion took place. The Moderator asked for 
a show of hands on the motion to amend the article, 
motion carried. Samuel Poulten moved the question to 
stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on the motion to stop debate, motion carried, 
unanimously. He then attempted a vote by a way of a 
show of hands, which left the Chair in doubt. The tellers 
came forward and conducted a hand count: Yes 105 No 
8— %'s 76 motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Thomas E. Firth Jr. of the Planning Board, moved that 
the Town vote to amend Zoning By-Law Article III, 
General Regulations, Section 3300 Signs and Outdoor 
Lighting as follows: 

1 . Under Section 3320 Signs Permitted in Residen- 
tial Districts by adding the following subsection: 

3326 Temporary, freestanding political signs, not 
exceeding in aggregate twety-four (24) square feet 
in area, which is designed to influence the action 



of voters for the passage or defeat of a referendum 
question or other measure appearing on the ballot 
of an election duly called in the Town of Chelms- 
ford or designed to influence the action of voters 
for election of a candidate whose name appears 
on the ballot of an election duly called in the Town 
of Chelmsford. Such signs may be erected no 
sooner than twenty-one (21) days prior to the date 
of election and must be removed not later than 
fourteen (14) days after such election. Signs per- 
mitted by this by-law: (a) shall not be higher than 
three feet above ground level; (b) shall not be ar- 
tificially illuminated; (c) shall be freestanding and 
not attached to a building, tree, utility pole, or 
fence; (d) shall be set back at least 15 feet from 
the street line; and (e) shall only be located within 
the front or side yard area of the property. These 
signs require no sign permit. 

2. Under Section 3330 Signs Permitted in Business 
Districts by adding the following subsection: 

3337 Temporary, freestanding political signs, not 
exceeding in aggregate twenty-four (24) square 
feet in area, which is designed to influence the ac- 
tion of voters for the passage or defeat of a referen- 
dum question or other measure appearing on the 
ballot of an election duly called in the Town of 
Chelmsford or designed to influence the action of 
voters for election of a candidate whose name ap- 
pears on the ballot of an election duly called in 
the Town of Chelmsford. Such signs may be 
erected no sooner than twenty-one (21) days prior 
to the date of election and must be removed not 
later than fourteen (14) days after such election. 
Signs permitted by this by-law: (a) shall not be 
higher than three feet above ground level; (b) shall 
not be artificially illuminated; (c) shall be free- 
standing and not attached to a building, tree, utili- 
ty pole, or fence; (d) shall be set back at least 15 
feet from the street line; and (e) shall only be 
located within the front or side yard of the pro- 
perty. These signs require no sign permit. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Thomas E. Firth Jr., Plann- 
ing Board member moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law Article I Administra- 
tion and Procedure, Section 1200 Administration b) 

adding the following subsection: 

1260 Non-Criminal Disposition 

In addition to the procedure for enforcement as 
described above, the provisions ^>f this by-law may 
also be enforced by non-criminal disposition as 
provided in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
40, Section 2 ID. The penalty for such violation 
shall be $25.00 for the first offense, $50.00 for the 
second offense, $100.00 for the third offense, and 
$200.00 for the fourth and each subsequent 
offense. 



26 



Town Counsel James Harrington explained that this 
by-law would allow the Building Inspector to issue 
tickets for small zoning violations. A discussion 
followed . 

Chairman of the Planning Board. Kim MacKenzie. 
read the Board's recommendation: The Planning Board 
held a public hearing on March 13. 1991 and voted to 
recommend Article #14. as advertised, for the April 1991 
Town Warrant at the Planning Board meeting of March 
13. 1991 (7-OL 

Both the Finance Committee and the Board of Select- 
men were in favor of this article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote pursuant to General Law 
Chapter 82. Section 21. that public convenience and 
necessity require that a portion of Douglas Road also 
known as the Douglas Road Extension, as hereinafter 
described shall be discontinued and all public rights and 
all portions of said streets, and/or town ways relative 
to said street shall be henceforth discontinued and 
abandoned: said street is more particularly described 
as follows: 

That portion of Douglas Road, as shown of a plan en- 
titled "Proposed Discontinuance Douglas Road Exten- 
sion ATM 1991 dated March 6. 1991.'' on file with the 
Town Clerk. 

And moved that the Town vote authorize the Board 
of Selectmen for consideration to be determined, to con- 
vey and transfer, all right, title and interest, if any. held 
by the town in the above parcel of land located on the 
discontinued portion of said way/road, to the owners 
of the properly set forth in a covenant to the Town of 
Chelmsford Planning Board, recorded in the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2881. page 289 
and covering said way. 

Town Counsel James Harrington explained the arti- 
cle. The Finance Committee and the Board of Select- 
men were in favor of the article. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands vote. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Robert Joyce member of the 
Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer 
Commissioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple 
with the buidings and trees thereon by purchase, emi- 
nent domain, or otherwise, for the property located in 
the Town of Chelmsford. Massachusetts, and further 
described and shown on a set of plans entitled ""Plan 
of Sewer Easements in Chelmsford. Massachusetts. 
Phase IIB Sewers, prepared for the Chelmsford Sewer 
Commission March 18. 1991. by Richard F. Kaminski 
& Associates. Inc.'' copy of which is on file in the of- 
fice of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein 



by reference, for the purpose of constructing and main- 
taining sewers, pumping stations, and all other appur- 
tenance thereto. 

Robert Joyce, vice chairman of the Sewer Commis- 
sion, read the Board's recommendation: 



The easement article is required to allow for the 
modification of two easements. 

The first easement is in the Bisson Street/Frank Street 
area. The original easement was positioned to allow the 
sewer to connect Frank Street to Bisson Street through 
the property of #10 Bisson Street, due to the close pro- 
ximity of the required construction to the home at #10 
Bisson Street, and the potential for damage to the struc- 
ture during construction, the Commission voted to 
select an alternative location for the easement through 
a wooded area west of the nearby homes. Chelmford 
Conservation Commission approval was needed for the 
modification. The second easement is in the Margerite 
Drive area. The modification to the easement was re- 
quired by the Chelmsford Conservation Commission 
in order to mitigate the tree and wetland destruction 
between Margerite Drive and Tyngsboro Road. Both 
easements were approved by the Conservation Com- 
mission Order of Conditions dated February 28. 1991. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommend the article. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved tht the Town vote to accept the following men- 
tioned streets as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and 
shown by their reports duly filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk. 

1. Nashoba Drive 

2. Sarah Lane 

3. Virginia Lane 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with 
the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and sub- 
ject to the withholding any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met and to see if the town will 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any 
and all temporary and/or permanent easements, and 
any property in fee simple, with trees thereon, by pur- 
chase, eminent domain or otherwise, for the purpose 
of securing traffic safety and road improvements, and 
vote that the town raise and appropriate the sum of 
S3. 00 to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses 
in connection with the acquisition of said land and for 
paying any damages which may be awarded as a result 
of any such taking: and to see if the town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and ex- 
ecute all necessary and proper contracts and agreements 
thereto. 



11 



Selectman Dennis Ready explained the location and 
showed a view graph of the streets mentioned. The 
Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee recom- 
mend the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Philip Currier moved at the 
request of the petitioners, that the proposed amend- 
ment to the existing zoning map as set forth in this ar- 
ticle be withdrawn. < Chelmsford Mall property- off 
Chelmsford Street 1 Landowners will prepare a more 
detailed plan for consideration by the Planning Board 
and for presentation to Town Meeting Representatives. 
(Possibly at the October session of Annual Town 
Meeting. 1 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands on the motion to withdraw, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Ronald Wetmore. alternate 
member of the Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
District, moved that the town vote to accept provisions 
of Section 12 of Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985. 
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT ACT. in relation to the 
Equal Educational Opportunity Grant in the amount 
of seventeen thousand two hundred seven dollars 
iS17.207.00) for the Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School, conditioned upon the funding of said programs 
by any source other than the Town of Chelmsford, and 
further conditioned upon, to the extent permitted by 
law. that said professional grant programs, and any 
monies paid to any employee of the Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School, shall not be used or considered 
a past practice for the purpose of collective bargaining 
and shall be nonrecurring lump sum payment not built 
into school employees salary schedules. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article, this 
is an annual article that the Town benefits from. The 
Board of Selectmen approve of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Fire Chief Robert L. Hughes 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1990: an Act concerning 
enhanced 911 service. 

Police Chief Raymond McKeon. briefly explained that 
passasge of this article was required in order to allow 
the whole Town to be covered by the 911 service, at 
no cost to the Town. Presently only the phone numbers 
with a 256. 250 and 251 beginning number are covered 
directly. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



Andrew Silinish moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Monday. May 6th. at 7:30 PM. The Finance Commit- 
tee was in favor of the motion to adjourn. The Board 
of Selectmen were not. The Board wanted to adjourn 
to Tuesday evening, due to the fact that there was a 
scheduled public hearing at 6:30 PM and also due to 
the fact that the Board had to decide about the over- 
ride questions. It was felt that this could be a lengthy 
meeting and that the Selectmen would have to adjourn 
the meeting and be at the McCarthy for the 7:30 PM 
session of the adjourned Annual Town Meeting, the 
Board possibility may not be able to finish their schedul- 
ed business at hand. More discussion took place. Bar- 
bara Ward of the School Committee, said that her Board 
had a conflict with the Tuesday evening date. The 
School Committee had scheduled their meeting for that 
night. Selectman Ready moved to amend the adjourn- 
ment to be at 8:00 PM on Monday. May 6th at the 
McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion to adjourn, 
motion carried. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:10 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire. 
Town Clerk 



ADOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 6, 1991 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:00 PM at the McCarthy Middle School Gym- 
nasium, by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. The 
Moderator recognized the presence of a quorum, there 
were 139 Representative Town Meeting Members 
present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By- 
Laws by deleting Article VII, Miscellaneous, Section 
9, Sodium Vapor Lamps in its entirety. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that if the 
Town changed the street lights throughout the Town 
there would be a total savings of $15,000.00. If the 
lighting in the Historic area which is located in the 
center of the Town, would be changed to the sodium 
vapor lights, this area would reflect a $2,000.00 savings. 
The lighting area around the Town is being changed 
over, however, the Historic By-law will not allow the 
use of the sodium vapor lamps in the district. The 
lighting is that of the mercury vapor which is expen- 
sive to maintain. This is an area that the Town could 
save some money in and he asked for support of the 



28 



article. Robert LaPorte, Chairman of the Historic Dis- 
trict, said that the district was against this motion to 
delete. In 1976 the Town of Chelmsford voted to have 
a Historic District, and by-laws. In 1983, the Town 
voted to accept the sodium vapor by-law. The Town 
should maintain what the Historic District has asked 
private homeowners/business within the district to use, 
mercury vapor lighting. There are about 51 lights in 
question, and according to the Historic Commission's 
information the savings would only be approximately 
$200.00. A lengthy discussion took place, a number of 
Representatives spoke in favor of the Historic Commis- 
sion's feelings of maintaining the mercury lighting. They 
felt that the Board was appointed to maintain the area 
and that the Town Meeting members should take the 
advice of the Commission. Just because money can be 
saved may not necessarily be the right choice. Bernard 
Lynch mentioned historic areas throughout Massachu- 
setts that had the sodium vapor lighting. David Foner 
moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands vote, which left the Chair 
in doubt. The following tellers were called forward and 
a hand count was conducted: 

Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, Jean 
Horgan. 

Result of the hand count: Yes 109 No 8— %'s is 78 mo- 
tion carried. The Moderator asked for a vote by way 
of show of hands on the article. Again the Chair was 
in doubt, a hand count was taken: Yes 84 No 51, mo- 
tion crried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Selectman Dennis Ready 
moved to dismiss this article. Barbara Scavezze of the 
Solid Waste Commission explained that this may be 
brought back at the October meeting if there was a pro- 
ven need. The Board of Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee support the motion to withdraw. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Jeffrey Brem, member of the 
Sewer Commission asked for this article to be with- 
drawn. Robert Joyce of the Sewer Commission spoke 
against the withdrawal. The Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion to 
withdraw. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of 
a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Selectman Dennis Ready 
moved to amend the by-law as shown by deleting 
subsection 2 in its entirety and subsection 3 shall be #2. 
It was explained that the need for this by-law was due 
to the Westland's School being closed one day during 
the winter months because the sidewalks had been 
plowed in time for the school opening. It was felt that 
this could have been avoided if this by-law was passed. 
There are only two sidewalk plows, the School Depart- 
ment has the Town plow the areas where the students 
walk first. Any outlining sidewalks are done after the 



requested areas. When asked who would enforce this 
by-law the reply was the Police Department. A discus- 
sion took place. Representatives were concerned that 
the wording would allow the homeowner, who hired 
a contractor to plow their driveway, would be fined be- 
cause the contractor left snow in the plowed street. Also 
if the sidewalk is shoveled off then if someone slips and 
gets hurt, who is liable, the Town or the homeowner. 
Town Counsel James Harrington said the homeowner 
could be held responsible. The Finance Committee sup- 
ports the motion to amend the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands on the mo- 
tion to amend, motion carried. Bruce Harper moved 
to amend the article by adding the words to the sec- 
ond line or Fire Hydrant or other similar device in the 
Town so as to impede obstruct, or otherwise adversely 
affect the unrestricted flow of traffic or conceal any Fire 
Hydrant or other similar device or the safe travel of any 
pedestrian on such roadway or sidewalk. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands 
on the motion to amend, motion carried. Joseph Er- 
bacher attempted to amend the article, but the Town 
Counsel advised againsts the wording. Concern was 
discussed about the first paragraph, last sentence, it 
sounded like an employee of the Town would be al- 
lowed to put snow in the streets/sidewalks. Selectman 
Dennis Ready moved to delete this sentence from the 
By-law. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to delete, motion carried. The Moderator 
read the entire motion as amended: 

Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the town vote 
to amend Article V Streets and Sidewalks of the 
General By-Laws by adding Section 21 "Snow and 
Ice" as follows: 

1. No person shall pile, push, throw, shovel, or by 
any other method or means cause snow to be 
deposited or placed on any public roadway or 
sidewalk or fire hydrant or other similar device in 
the town so as to impede, obstruct, or interrupt 
or otherwise adversely affect the unrestricted flow 
of traffic or conceal any fire hydrant or other 
similar device, or the safe travel of any pedestrian 
on such roadway or sidewalk. 

2. Violations of this section of the By-law shall be 
punishable by a fine of not more than $25.00 for 
each violation. Each instance or new day shall 
constitute a separate violation. 

Brad Emerson moved the question to stop any fur- 
ther debate. The Moderator asked for vote by way of 
a show of hands motion carried, unanimously. He then 
asked for a vote on the article as amended by a show 
of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 David J. McLachlan, member 
of the Conservation Commission, moved that the town 
vote to amend the General By-Laws Article VI Police 
Regulations, Section 22; Prohibition of Trapping By 



29 



Means of the Leghold and Conibear Trap by adding 
a new paragraph as follows: 

(5) Noth withstanding the provisions of this by- 
law, the Conservation Commission or their 
authorized agents may use such traps and may 
destroy any fur-bearing mammals subject to 
regulation herein, if the Conservation Com- 
mission determines that such animals pose a 
substantial present of potential hazard to 
public health, welfarem, safety, or to the 
environment. 

James McBride explained the article. There is a beaver 
at the Cranberry Bog who is making a dam and caus- 
ing problems with the water supply. The Friends of 
Animals from Rhode Island will trap the beaver, and 
remove it from the area. A lengthy discussion took 
place. The Finance Committee was in favor of the arti- 
cle, but questioned the legality of it. Town Counsel 
assured the body that the wording was legal. Andrew 
Silinish moved to amend the article by adding a 
sentence to the last paragraph "and after other trap- 
ping means have failed and been documented in each 
occurrence." The Finance Committee and the Board 
of Selectmen had no recommendation on the motion 
to amend. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
vote on the motion to amend, motion defeated. The 
discussion continued. Cheryl Warshafsky questioned, 
if this was a potential health hazard, why had not the 
Board of Health been called in to handle the situation 
already. Director Richard Day said that the Board of 
Health was unaware of the situation. David McLachlan 
moved to amend the article. "I move that all restric- 
tive trapping regulations be rescinded. ' ' Town Counsel 
ruled this motion out of order. Edward Hilliard moved 
the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for 
a vote by way of hand count, motion carried, unani- 
mously. He then asked for a hand vote on the article, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26 David J. McLachlan, 
member of the Conservation Commission, moved that 
the town vote to amend the General By-laws Article 
XI General Wetland By-law as follows: 

1. Under Section 15 Fee Schedule by deleting 
paragraphs 1 and 2 under Fees: which reads: 

1) Wetland By-Law Hearing 

Dwelling, tennis court, swimming pool, 
bridge, etc. -$25. 00 

2) Multiple Dwelling Units 
Commercial & Industrial-$100.00 

and by substituting in their place the following: 

The Commission may adopt and impose project 
review charges in accordance with regulations pro- 
mulgated pursuant to its authority under Massachusetts 
General Laws. 



2) Under Section 16: Definitions by adding the 
following paragraphs: 

(g) The terms "land Under Water Bodies or 
Waterways," "Vernal Pool Habitat," 
shall be defined as defined in 310 CRM 
10.04 

(h) The term "Lower Floodplain" shall mean 
the area of land within the statistical 10 
year flood or within 100 feet of the bank 
or boundary vegetated wetland, which- 
ever is further from the waterbody or 
waterway. 

(i) The term ' 'wildlife' ' shall mean all mam- 
mals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and all 
vertebrate and invertebrate aimal species, 
except domesticated species. 

(j) The term "Wildlife habitat" shall mean 
those areas subject to these "by-laws' 
which due to the plant community com- 
position and structure, hydrologic regime, 
or other characteristics provide important 
food, shelter, migratory travel or over- 
wintering areas or breeding areas for wild- 
life. 

(k) The term "rare species' ' shall mean those 
vertebrate and invertebrate animal species 
officially listed as endangered, threat- 
ened, or of special concern by the Massa- 
chusetts Division of Fisheries and Wild- 
life under 321 CMR 8.00 and those plant 
species listed as rare, threatened, or en- 
dangered by the Massachusetts natural 
Heritage Program 

(3) After Section 19 Invalidity by adding a new 
section as follows: 
Section 20 Wildlife Habitat Evaluation 

(1) Measuring Adverse Effects on Wildlife 
Habitat 

a. To the extent that a proposed project 
will alter vernal pool habitat or will 
alter other wildlife habitat such altera- 
tions may be permitted only if they will 
have no adverse effects on wildlife or 
vernal habitat. Adverse effects on 
wildlife or vernal habitat shall mean 
the alteration of any habitat character- 
istic such as food, shelter, migratory 
breeding and overwintering areas, in- 
sofar as such alteration will, follow 2 
growing seasons of project completion 
and thereafter (or, if a project would 
eliminate trees, upon the maturity of 
replanted saplings) substantially reduce 



30 



its capacity to provide important wild- 
life and vernal habitat functions. Such 
performance standards, however, shall 
not apply to the habitat or rare species. 
All projects that may impact on rare 
species must apply through the Mass- 
achusetts Natural Heritage and En- 
dangered Species Program at least 90 
days prior to the filing of a Notice of 
Intent. 

b. An evaluation by the applicant of 
whether a proposed project will have 
an adverse effect on wildlife habitat 
beyond permissible thresholds shall be 
performed by an individual with at 
least a masters degree in wildlife 
biology or ecological science from an 
accredited college or university, or 
other competent professional with at 
least 2 years' experience in wildlife 
habitat evaluation. 

c. Any wildlife habitat management prac- 
tices conducted by the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife, and any wild- 
life management practices of any in- 
dividual or organization if reviewed 
and approved in writing by said Divi- 
sion, shall be presumed to have no 
adverse effect on wildlife habitat. Such 
presumption is rebuttal, and may be 
overcome by a clear showing to the 
contrary. 

Wildlife Habitat Characteristics of In- 
land Resource Areas: 

a. Banks. The topography, soil structure, 
and plant community composition and 
structure of banks can provide the 
following important wildlife habitat 
functions: food, shelter, migratory 
wildlife, breeding and overwintering 
areas of wildlife. 

b. Land Under Water Bodies or Water- 
ways. The Plant community and soil 
composition and structure, hydrologic 
regime, topography and water quality 
of land under water bodies or water- 
ways can provide the following impor- 
tant wildlife habitat functions: food, 
shelter, breeding areas and overwin- 
tering areas for wildlife. 



c. 



Vernal Pool Habitat. The topography, 
soil structure, plant community com- 
position and structure, and hydrologic 
regime of vernal pool habitat can pro- 
vide the following important wildlife 



habitat functions: food, shelter, 
migratory, breeding, and overwinter- 
ing areas for wildlife. 

d. Lower Flood Plans. The hydrologic 
regime, plant community, and soil 
composition and structure, topo- 
graphy, and proximity to water bodies 
and waterways of lower floodplains can 
provide the following important 
wildlife habitat functions: food, 
shelter, migratory, overwintering and 
breeding areas for wildlife. 

James McBride, chairman of the Conservation Com- 
mission explained the article. The Board of Selectmen 
and Finance Committee supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for the need of discussion, hearing 
none he asked for a vote by show of hands, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27 Selectman Dennis Ready 
moved that the Moderator be allowed to waive the 
reading of this article. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The 
article was the adoption of state stautes as fire rules and 
regulations. The Board of Selectmen and Finance Com- 
mittee were in favor of the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote on the article by way of a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Fire Chief Robert L. Hughes, moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General By-laws as follows: 

1 . By deleting Article V Streets & Sidewalks Sec- 
tion 18 Street Numbers in its entirety. 

2. By adding Article XIII— Fire By-laws as follows: 
Article XIII— Fire By-Laws 

Section 1 Purpose 

The following bylaws are intended to provide the fire 
department with authority to monitor and enforce fire 
safety and prevention measures within the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

Section 2 Definitions 

1 . Alarm— Any notification made to the fire depart- 
ment that a situation exists or may exist that re- 
quires a response. 

2. Fire Alarm System— A combination of compati- 
ble initiating devices, control panels, and in- 
dicating appliances designed and installed to pro- 
vide an alarm signal in the event of a fire. 

3. Unintentional Fire Alarm— An alarm caused by 
any of the following: 



31 



a) inadequate or improper maintenance of a 
private fire alarm system; or 

b) working on or tampering with a fire alarm 
system without giving proper notification to 
the fire department; or 

c) failure to control dust, steam, smoke or other 
materials causing an alarm 

4. Master Box— A municipal fire alarm box tht may 
also be operated by remote means. 

5. Multiple Dwelling— Any dwelling that contains 
three or more living quarters, including but not 
limited to hotels, motels, dormitories, apartments, 
condominiums, lodging and boarding houses, and 
care facilities. 

6. Street Box— A municipal fire alarm box that is 
operated manually. 

7. Set Back— The distance from a public or private 
way to the front of a given building. A parking 
lot shall not be considered a public or private way 
for purposes of this section. 

8. Service Station— Any building or premises 
wherein or upon which gasoline or other motor 
fuel is sold at retail. 

a) Full self-service facility. A service station 
where all the pumps are self-service. 

b) Self-service type business. As used in these 
by-laws, shall mean that type of business 
wherein the licensed motor vehicle operator 
dispenses his own motor fuel. 

c) Split-island facility. A motor fuel dispensing 
installation where part of the facility is used 
as self-service and part is used for attendant 
service. 

9. Garage— Any building wherein is kept or stored 
one or more motor vehicles; including but not 
limited to a public or private garage, car port, 
motor vehicle repair shop or paint shop, service 
station, lubritorium, or any building used for 
similar purposes. 

a) Residential garage. A private building, or 
part thereof, having a capacity of not more 
than three (3) motor vehicles when not used 
for commercial repair or servicing operations. 

b) Special garage. A special structure limited in 
use to the parking of motor vehicles. 



Section 3 Street Numbers 

1 . The Board of Selectmen or its designee may deter- 
mine and designate numbers for all buildings 
abutting upon or adjacent to public and private 
ways. 

2. No person shall neglect or refuse to affix on any 
building owned by him the street number 
designated for him by said Board or its designee, 
nor shall any person affix or suffer to remain on 
the building owned or occupied by him a street 
number other than the one designated by said 
Board or its designee. 

3. All numbers shall comply with the following 
shedule; 



Set back (defined in 


Minimum Number 


Section 2) 


Size 


0-50' 


3" 


50-100' 


4" 


greater than 100' 


6" 



4. Street numbers shall be affixed in locations ap- 
proved by the fire chief or his designee and where 
possible the following locations shall be 
mandatory: 

a) If a set back is less than 200 feet, the number 
shall be placed near the front or main door 
of the building provided that the door is visi- 
ble from a public or private way. 

b) If a setback is greater than 200 feet, or if the 
main or front door is not visible from the 
public or private way. the street numbers must 
be affixed to a sign posted near the driveway 
or entrance to the property in such a manner 
so that the sign is visible year round. 

5 . If several occupancies share a single address, each 
doorway shall be numbered with a street number 
and unit number. The unit number shall include 
all units served by the marked doorway. The street 
numbers shall comply with the schedule outlined 
in paragraph 3 and in all cases the unit numbers 
shall be 2" or higher. 

6. Street numbers shall be a color that contrasts with 
the background upon which they are mounted. 
If a signboard is used for a background it shall be 
a minimum of one square foot per digit. 

Section 4 Owner/Manager Information 

1. An owner of a multiple dwelling who does not 
reside therein and who does not employ a 



32 



manager or agent for such dwelling who resides 
therein, shall post and maintain or cause to be 
posted or maintained on such dwelling, adjacent 
to the mailboxes for such dwelling or on the ex- 
terior of such dwelling in a location visible to the 
public, a notice, not less than twenty square in- 
ches in size, bearing his name, address, and 
telephone number or the name, address, and 
telephone number of such manager or agent. 

2. The owner of said multiple dwelling shall submit 
annually before January 31st. the address of the 
dwelling, the name of the dwelling if any. the 
name of the trust, association, or organization if 
any. which manages or owns the dwelling, the 
names, addresses, and telephone numbers of all 
owners and managers. Such information shall be 
provided in a form approved by the Fire 
Department. 

Section 5 Municipal Master Box/Street Box 

1 . Any owner of property applying for a tie-in to the 
municipal fire alarm system shall first obtain a per- 
mit, on a form provided by the Fire Department 
prior to the installation of a master box or street 
box as those terms are defined in Section 1 . Each 
tie in permit shall cost SI 00. 00. 

2. Any violation of this section shall be punishable 
by a fine of S100.00 for each offense. Each day 
that any violation continues shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

Section 6 Existing and New Sprinkler Systems/Tie In 

1. All new and existing buildings with sprinkler 
systems shall be connected to the municipal fire 
alarm system via a master box connection. All 
buildings which fall into this category shall make 
connection no later than June 30. 1992. 

2. Any violations of this section shall be punishable 
by a fine of S200.00 for each offense. Each day 
that any violation continues shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

Section 7 Unintentional Fire Alarms 

1 . The owner of any building which has a fire alarm 
system shall only be allowed three unintentional 
fire alarms, as that term is defined in Section 2. 
per calendar year. 

2. After the third unintentional fire alarm the owner 
shall be fined S50.00 and shall be fined SI 00. 00 
for each additional offense thereafter. Each day 
that any violation continues shall constitute a 
separate offense. 



Section 8 — Operation of Service Stations, Garages us- 
ed for Commercial Purposes, Self Service Stations 
including Convenience Stores 

1. Electricl Wiring and Heating 

1 . Artificial lighting of a garage shall be only by 
means of electric lights. All electrical work and 
equipment shall be installed in accordance 
with Massachusetts Electrical Code 527 CMR 
12.00. 

2. In the case of a garage, other than a residen- 
tial garage, heated by a central heating unit 
located on or below the garage floor, such unit 
shall be located in a room separated from the 
garage by a fire partition and all openings 
therein shall be protected by either fire doors 
or fire windows. A garage may be heated by 
gas. oil. electric unit heater(s) and/or central 
heating units located in the heated area 
without fire partitions, provided that such 
equipment is located not less than eight (8) 
feet above the garage floor, and in the case 
of gas or oil the combustion chamber of such 
heater shall be properly vented to the outer 
air. The hot air from a central heating unit 
shall enter the garage not less than four (4') 
feet above the floor level of the garage. The 
return air registers of any duct distribution 
system connected to unit heater, central 
heater or warm air furnaces shall be located 
not less than four (4') feet above the garage 
floor. No space heates (as defined in 527 CMR 
4.00) shall be permitted. 

3. Heating equipment may be installed in non- 
residential motor vehicle repair or parking 
areas where there is no dispensing or transfer- 
ring of Class I or II flammable liquids (as de- 
fined in NFPA 30. Flammable and Combusti- 
ble Liquids Code), or liquefied petroleum gas. 
provided the bottom of the combustion 
chamber is not less than 18 in. (.5m) above 
the floor, the heating equipment is protected 
from physical damage by vehicles, and con- 
tinuous mechanical ventilation is provided at 
the rate of .75 cfm/sq. ft. (.75m 3 /min per m 2 ) 
of the floor area. The heating system and the 
ventilation system shall be suitably interlock- 
ed to ensure operation of the ventilation 
system when the heating system is in 
operation. 

4. In the case of a residential garage, any heater 
or appliance unit may be located on the garage 
floor provided the source of ignition from 
combustion chambers, motors, etc., shall be 
located not less than six (6) inches above the 



33 



floor level. In the case of a residential garage 
having a floor below surrounding grade, the 
combustion chamber or ignition source of any 
heater or appliance unit shall be raised not less 
than eighteen (18) inches above the floor level. 
Any heater or appliance unit installed in a 
residential garage shall be suitably protected 
from physical damage as directed by the 
authority having jurisdiction. No space 
heaters (as defined in 527 CMR 4.00) shall be 
permitted. 

2. Operation and Maintenance 

1 . Suitable receptacles filled with sand or other 
nonflammable absorbent material, to be used 
in absorbing waste oil, shall be constantly kept 
on the floors of every garage having a net floor 
area of more than one thousand (1,000) 
square feet; and at leasts one metal pail filled 
with sand, for use in case of fire, shall be pro- 
vided for every one thousand (1,000) square 
feet of floor area. 

2. A pit for greasing, lubricating, washing or 
wheel alignment purposes may be permitted . 
provided such pit is of a sufficient area and 
so constructed as to permit ready escape 
therefrom in case of emergency. No such pit 
shall, in any case be used for repair purposes 
on gasoline powered vehicles. 

3. All garages shall be kept clean and shall be 
provided with a sufficient number of self- 
closing metal receptacles in which all com- 
bustible waste material shall be kept until re- 
moved from the building. 

4 . A fire extinguisher shall be provided for every 
garage of one thousand (1,000) square feet of 
floor area and an additional fire extinguisher 
shall be provided for every additional two 
thousand (2,000) square feet of floor area. 
Such extinguishers shall be of an approved * 
type for an oil fire, located as directed by the 
head of the fire department, and not less than 
4B rating. The maximum travel distance to 
reach such an extinguisher shall not exceed 
fifty (50) feet. 

The protection requirements may be fulfilled 
with extinguishers of higher ratings provided 
the maximum travel distance to such larger 
extinguisher shall not exceed seventy-five (75) 
feet. 

'NOTE: Any fire extinguisher listed with a 
nationally recognized testing laboratory will 
be considered approved. 



5. No person shall smoke in a garage, service sta- 
tion, or on the premises where gasoline or 
other motor fuels are sold or dispensed and 
notices to that effect, in block letters not less 
than two (2) inches in height shall be con- 
spicuously posted at the entrance to and 
within the garage or on said premises, and on 
each pump island visible to approaching 
vehicles; provided, however, that smoking 
may be allowed in a separate room as approv- 
ed by the head of the fire department. 

6. No wood shall be used in the construction of 
a locker in a garage having a net floor area of 
more than two thousand (2,000) square feet. 

7. No gasoline or other motor fuel shall be 
delivered to or taken from a motor vehicle 
while the engine thereof is running. This does 
not apply to tank trucks making deliveries by 
power. 

8. No gasoline or Class A flammable fluid shall 
be used for cleaning purposes or kept in any 
open receptacle for any purpose. 

9. All tanks used for the storage or sale of 
gasoline in connection with a garage or ser- 
vice station shall be made of standard open- 
hearth steel tank plate, or may be constructed 
of materials other than standard open-hearth 
steel tank plate when approved by the State 
Fire Marshal, and shall be costructed, install- 
ed and located in accordance with the provi- 
sions of 527 CMR 9.00. 

10. No gasoline pump shall be located above the 
street floor of a garage, nor shall gasoline be 
handled above the street floor unless the 
garage is a building of first-class construction. 

11. No motor vehicle shall be supplied with 
gasoline while in a garage in any other way 
than by means of a hose from either a por- 
table tank or direct from a storage tank. 

12. Any person, firm or corporation installing 
dispensing pumps for gasoline or other motor 
fuel in gasoline stations shall provide adequate 
protection against physical damage to said 
dispensing pumps. 

13. Each portable gasoline tank used in a garage 
shall not exceed fifty- five (55) gallons in 
capacity, shall be mounted on a substantial 
iron or steel frame with rubber-tired wheels, 
and shall be equipped with a suitable hose not 
exceeding sixteen (16) feet in length, having 
a shut-off valve located near the pump 
connection. 



34 



The shut-off valve shall be kept closed when 
not in use. 

14. Any portable or permanent electrically 
operated gasoline dispensing system authoriz- 
ed under 527 CMR 5.04 (11) and 5.04 (13) 
shall, in addition to the safety devices already 
required be protected by a heat activated 
shutoff switch, which will shut off the pump 
automatically when the temperature reaches 
165°F. This switch shall be located within two 
(2) feet of the ceiling and within ten (10) feet 
of the location of the nozzle discharge. 

15. No gasoline shall be delivered to the tank of 
any motor vehicle from a storage tank except 
by means of a hose equipped with an ap- 
proved self-closing nozzle which shall be held 
open manually while making delivery or by 
an approved automatic shut-off nozzle, and 
no such delivery shall be made except by the 
owner-operator or a duly authorized em- 
ployee, except as otherwise provided in 527 
CMR 5.04 (16). No gasoline shall be delivered 
into a portable container having a maximum 
capacity of seven (7) gallons or less which is 
not labeled in accordance with the pertinent 
provisions of 527 CMR 5.04 (18). 

16. The dispensing of motor fuel by means of self- 
service automated dispensing systems shall be 
permitted, provided that the applicant for 
such a system has submitted complete plans 
and specifications of the proposed installation 
to the State Fire Marshal accompanied by the 
required examination fee as authorized in Sec- 
tion 3B of Chapter 7, M.G.L., inserted by 
Chapter 684 of the Acts of 1975, and has ob- 
tained approval of said plans, and further pro- 
vided that there is compliance with the follow- 
ing: full self-service facility may be allowed 
provided that: 

a. The service station is under the control of 
the owner, operator, or duly authorized 
employee who shall be on duty at all times 
while motor fuel is being sold or 
dispensed . 

b. The motor fuel shall be dispensesd only 
by a competent licensed motor vehicle 
operator or by the service station 
attendant. 

c. In addition to 527 CMR 5.04 (5) and (8) , 
approved signs bearing the words "Ex- 
tinguish All Smoking Materials" and 
"Stop Motor While Refueling" shall be 
conspicuously posted at both ends of the 
pump dispensing island visible to ap- 
proaching vehicles. All approved signs re- 



quired by these regulations shall consist 
of block letters not less than two (2) in- 
ches in height and be either red letters on 
a white background or white letters on a 
red background. 

d. The controlling mechanism console pro- 
viding power to the pump motor is in con- 
stant attendance by the owner, operator 
or duly authorized employee at all times 
while motor fuel is being dispensed and 
is properly protected against physical 
damage from motor vehicles. Constant at- 
tendance shall mean that the console 
operator must be at the console during its 
operation. 

e. There is constant contact between the 
controlling mechanism console operator 
and the pump island by means of an inter- 
communication system which shall be 
maintained in proper operating condition 
at all times while motor fuel is being 
dispensed. 

f. A means is provided for the controlling 
mechanism console operator to observe 
the filling operation at each vehicle, and 
the dispensing of motor fuel shall be con- 
tinuously observed by the console 
operator during the time that any of the 
pumps have been activated to dispense 
motor fuel. 

g. The controlling mechanism console in- 
cludes a disconnect switch which will in- 
stantly cut off all pumping power to all 
motor fuel pumps at the service station. 

h. The controlling mechanism console, swit- 
ches, and related equipment are of a 
design and type approved by the State 
Fire Marshal. 

i. Any person, firm, or corporation con- 
structing a self-service facility or making 
changes or alterations in the method of 
dispensing motor fuel shall notify the 
head of the fire department, in writing, 
prior to submitting plans to the State Fire 
Marshal. 

j . Self-service automated motor fuel dispen- 
sing system for which plans have been 
submitted subsequent to June 20, 1975, 
shall be equipped with a fire extinguishing 
system of a type approved by the State 
Fire Marshal, details of which shall be in- 
cluded with plans submitted to the State 
Fire Marshal for approval. 



35 



k. Motor fuel shall be dispensed only by 
means of an approved automatic shut-off 
nozzle which shall be held open manu- 
ally. Hold-open clips shall not be allowed 
on self-service nozzles. Split-island facili- 
ty may be allowed provided that: 

1. There shall be installed on the full service 
islands an additional switch which will ac- 
tivate the overhead fire suppression 
system on, and deactivate power to, the 
self-service island. 

m. The station operator shall be within 25 
feet of one of the switches as defined in 
(2) (a) whenever the self-service dispens- 
ing mechanism is in operation. 

n. Whenever the self-service dispensing 
mechanism is in operation, the service sta- 
tion operator shall be within visual range 
of the filling operation, complying with 
527 CMR 5.04 (16) (a), 5.04 (16) (b),5.04 
(16) (c), 5.04 (16) (g), 5.04 (16) (h), 5.04 
(16) (i), 5.04 (16) (j), and 5.04 (16) (k). 

17. No gasoline shall be handled outside of 
storage tanks or portable gasoline tanks ex- 
cept in approved safety cans or approved 
metal or plastic containers, and they shall be 
kept tightly closed except when in use. Con- 
tainers used for the handling and storage of 
gasoline in garages shall have a total quantity 
not to exceed fourteen (14) gallons, and no 
such container shall have a capacity in excess 
of seven (7) gallons. 

18. No person shall sell or offer for sale any con- 
tainer having as capacity of seven (7) gallons 
or less which in any way is represented as 
suitable for the storage and/or transportation 
of gasoline or kerosene unless such container 
has been approved by the state Fire Marshal 
and has permanently affixed thereon a state- 
ment of approval, an approval number, and 
the date of approval as issued by the State Fire 
Marshal. Gasoline container shall be red in 
color approved by the State Fire Marshal and 
shall bear the word "Kerosene. ' ' Lettering on 
both containers shall be permitted. This rule 
shall not apply to those containers constructed 
and tested in accordance with Underwriters 
Laboratories (UL) Metal Safety Can standard 
30 or Factory Mutual (FM) Safety Can Stan- 
dard 6051/6052 for the storage and handling 
of small quantities of flammable and com- 
bustible liquids. 

19. No gasoline or other petroleum products shall 
be allowed to flow upon the floor of or into 
the drainage system of a garage. 



20. No tank wagon or tank truck used for the 
transportation of gasoline, oil, or other 
petroleum products shall be kept in any por- 
tion of a garage unless the garage is used ex- 
clusively for the keeping of such vehicles or 
unless the portion so used is separated from 
the rest of the garage by a fire wall. The pro- 
visions of this rule need not apply provided 
all vehicles kept in the garage are the proper- 
ty of one owner. 

21. No tank that has been used for the keeping 
or storage of gasoline shall be removed or 
relocated except as provided in Sectin 38- A, 
Chapter 148 of the General Laws, as 
amended. 

22. All openings in barrels or drums which have 
once contained Class A flammables shall be 
kept tightly closed at all times, except when 
being refilled, emptied or repaired. 

3. General Provisions 

1. All garages and the manner of keeping, stor- 
ing or using gasoline in connection therewith 
shall be subject to the inspection of any 
member of the Department of Public Safety, 
and the head of the fire department or his 
assistants. 

2. In the event of a leak, rupture, spill, overflow 
or other accident involving the handling of 
flammable liquids, the head of the fire depart- 
ment shall be notified immediately. 

3. All underground storage facilities except fuel 
oil tanks and containers connected with bur- 
ning equipment shall be installed and 
monitored for the prevention and detection 
of leakage of flammable and combustible li- 
quids in accordance with the following 
provisions: 

a. Accurate daily inventory records by 
means of dip sticking shall be maintained 
and reconciled on all flammable or com- 
bustible liquid underground storage tanks 
for indication of possible leakage from 
said tanks or piping. The records shall be 
kept on the premises available for inspec- 
tion by any member of the Department 
of Public Safety, and head of the fire 
department or his designee, and shall in- 
clude, as a minimum, records showing 
type of product, daily reconciliation bet- 
ween sales, use, receipts and inventory on 
hand. If there is more than one system 
consisting of a tank(s) , serving pump(s) or 
dispenser(s) for any product, the recon- 
ciliation shall be maintained separately for 
each tank system. 



36 



b. Daily inventory shall be maintained for 
each tank system at each location by the 
operator. The inventory records shall be 
kept for a minimum of the past twelve ( 12) 
months at the premises. The operator 
shall mean the lessee or person (s) in con- 
trol of and having responsibility for the 
daily operation of the facility for the 
storage and dispensing of flammable and 
combustible liquids. 

c. Inventory shall be based on the actual dai- 
ly measurement and recording of tank 
product and water levels and the daily 
recording of actual sales, use, and 
receipts. Daily measurements will be ac- 
ceptable either by gauge, gauge stick, or 
by readout from an automated gauging 
system. The inventory records shall in- 
clude a daily computation of gain or loss. 
The mere recording of pump meter 
readings and product delivery receipts 
shall not constitute adequate inventory- 
records. 

d. The operator of the location shall be 
responsible to notify the head of the fire 
department of situation, and to notify the 
owner or person (s) in control of the facili- 
ty to take action to correct any abnormal 
loss or gain not explainable by spillage, 
temperature variations or other causes. 
The owner shall mean the person(s) who 
owns, as real property, the tank storage 
system used for the storage and dispens- 
ing of flammable and combustible liquids. 

e. As a minimum the following steps shall 
be taken in an expeditious manner when 
daily inventory records indicate an abnor- 
mal loss: 

1 . The inventory reords shall be checked 
for error. 

2. If no error is apparent, an independent 
calculation of apparent loss shall be 
made by a qualified person starting 
from a point in time where the records 
indicate a no loss condition. 

3. If step 2 confirms no apparent loss, the 
readily accessible physical facilities on 
the premises shall be carefully in- 
spected for evidence of leakage. 

4. If step 3 does not disclose a leak, the 
dispensers used with the particular pro- 
duct involved with the apparent loss 
shall be checked for calibration. 



5. If steps 1 through 4 do not explain the 
apparent loss, the situation shall be 
reported promptly to the authority 
having jurisdiction. 

6. If step 4 does not explain the loss, and 
if the piping system can be tested 
without the need for excavation, the 
piping system between the storage tank 
and dispenser(s) shall be tested in ac- 
cordance with 527 CMR 9.06 (20) (a). 
If it is necessary to excavate to perform 
a piping test, such a test shall be con- 
ducted after a storage tank test has 
been performed in accordance with 
step 7. 

7. If step 6 does not disclose a leak, the 
storate tank(s) shall be tested for 
tightness by an approved test. 

8. If steps 1 through 7 do not confirm the 
apparent loss, the daily inventory shall 
be continued with a daily independent 
verification by a qualified person. Ad- 
ditional surveillance of the facility 
should be engaged to ensure against 
unauthorized removal of product. 

9. If any of the above tests or investiga- 
tions indicate the source of the loss, the 
owner shall take immediate action to 
correct the system failure. 

Daily inventories need not be maintain- 
ed on those days that an installation is not 
in operation, but not to exceed fifteen (15) 
days. 

The owner and operator will conduct an 
inventory verification program on a 
scheduled basis, at least once every two 
(2) years. A copy of the record of this 
verification program shall be kept on the 
premises available for inspection by any 
member of the Department of Public Safe- 
ty, or head of the fire department or his 
designee. 

NOTE: Upon the cessation of the exer- 
cise of a license, the holder of said license 
shall notify the local licensing authority 
and the head of the fire department in his 
area or district. The head of the fire 
department shall prescribe rules to 
eliminate hazardous conditions incident 
to such cessation as provided in 527 CMR 
10.12 (2). 



37 



4. The owner or operator of any self-service type 
business as that term is defined in Section 2, shall 
comply with all restrictions appearing on any and 
all plans submitted to and approved by the 
Chelmsford Fire Department and the State Fire 
Marshal, including but not limited to any and all 
restrictions concerning the number of employees 
who must be on the premises during operating 
hours. 

5. Any violation of this section shall be punishable 
by a fine of one hundred dollars ($100.00) for each 
offense. Each day that any violation continues 
shall constitute a separate offense. 

Section 9— Tanks and Containers 

1. Definitions. 

Abandoned, out of service for a continuous 
period in excess of six months in the case of a 
storage facility which a license from the local licen- 
sing authority is required under the provisions of 
M.G.L. c. 148. s. 13, and for a period in excess 
of twenty-four months in the case of any other 
storage facility. 

Approved, approved by the State Fire Marshal. 

Board, the Board of Fire Prevention Regulations. 

Cathodic protection, a system which inhibits the 
corrosion of a tank or its components either 
through the sacrificial anode or the impressed cur- 
rent method of creating a corrosion-inhibiting 
electrical current. (Reference: API (American 
Petroleum Institute) Publication 1632— First Edi- 
tion 1983). 

Commissioner, the Commissioner of Public 
Safety. 

Components, piping, pumps, and other related 
storing, conveyancing, and dispensing elements 
which, together with one or more tanks and any 
cathodic protection or monitoring system, con- 
stitute a storage facility. 

Consumptive use, fuel oil used exclusively for 
area heating and/or the heating of domestic water 
on the premises where stored. 

Corrosion Expert, a person who, by reason of 
thorough knowledge of the physical sciences and 
the principles of engineering and mathematics ac- 
quired by a professional education and related 
practical experience, is qualified to engage in the 
practice of corrosion control on buried or 
submerged metal piping systems and metal tanks. 
Such person shall be accredited or certified as be- 
ing qualified by the National Association of Cor- 



rosion Engineers (NACE) or be a Massachusetts 
registered professional corrosion engineer. The 
corrosion expert shall follow applicable NACE 
criteria. 

Department, the Department of Public Safety. 

Double-walled tank, a container with two com- 
plete shells which provide both primary and 
secondary containment. The container shall have 
a continuous three hundred sixty degree (360°) in- 
terstitial space between the primary and secondary 
shell. The interstitial space shall be designed so 
that an approved interstitial space monitor is able 
to continuously monitor this space. All double- 
walled tanks shall be UL-listed. 

Engineer, a Massachusetts registered professional 
engineer. 

European Suction System, an underground suc- 
tion piping system which is sloped back to the 
bank so that the contents of the piping will drain 
back into the tank if the suction is released, and 
only one check valve is used which is located 
directly under the dispenser. 

Existing facility, a facility whose construction, in- 
stallation or operation began prior to the effective 
date of the revised edition of 527 CMR 9.00 
printed and effective December 31, 1986. 

Flammable liquid, any liquid occurring at nor- 
mal temperature and pressure which will emit a 
vapor which can be ignited by a flame or spark. 

Flammable liquids, covered by these regulations 
are divided into the following three classes: 

Class A, any flammable liquid having a flash 
point below one hundred degrees 
Fahrenheit (100°F), to be ascertained 
by any standard closed-cup 
instrument. 

Class B, any flammable liquid having a flash 
point of not less than one hundred 
degrees Fahrenheit (100°F) nor higher 
than one hundred eighty-seven degrees 
Fahrenheit (187°F), to be ascertained 
by any standard closed-cup instru- 
ment. 

Class C, any flammable liquid having a flash 
point above one hundred eighty-seven 
degrees Fahrenheit (187°F) to be ascer- 
tained by any standard, closed-cup 
instrument. 

Fuel oil, oil of grades 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 established 
in accordance with M.G.L. c. 94, s. 249H. 



38 



Head of the fire department, the fire chief or 
other top ranking official of the local fire depart- 
ment. 

Leakage or leak, any uncontrolled movement, 
measurable by a final or precision test, as describ- 
ed in the current Pamphlet No. 329 of the Na- 
tional Fire Protection Association, which can ac- 
curately detect a leak of 0. 10 gallons per hour with 
the probability of detection of 0.99, and the pro- 
bability of false alarm of 0.01 . (NOTE: The Mass- 
achusetts Department of Environmental Protec- 
tion requires notice if a tightness test indicates a 
failure of 0.05 gallons per hour or greater.) 

Marshal, the State Fire Marshal. 

Monitoring system, a full-time approved system 
installed for the purpose of early detection of 
leaks, such as observation wells, visual or audible 
alarms, or their equivalent. Minimum standards 
of in-tank monitoring systems shall consist of in- 
tank equipment which provides continuous 
monitoring of any liquid from the tank at a 
minimum rate of 0.10 gallons per hour or more 
over a six-hour period with the probability of 
detection of 0.99, and the probability of false 
alarm of 0.01. 

Observation -well, a dug or drilled cased well 
which can be used for detecting the presence of 
flammable liquids, which is drilled to a depth in- 
tercepting the water table, and which is installed 
and maintained in an approved manner. 

Operator, the lessee of a storage facility, or the 
person or persons responsible for the daily opera- 
tion of a storage facility. 

Out of service, not in use in that no filling or with- 
drawal is occurring. 

Owner, the person or persons or government en- 
tity having legal ownersip of a storage facility. 

Person, any agency or political subdivision of the 
Federal Government or the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; any state, public or private cor- 
poration or authority, individual, trust, firm, joint 
stock company, partnership, association, consor- 
tium, joint venture, or other commercial entity; 
and any officer, employee or agent of said person, 
and any group of said persons. 

Pipeline, any trunk pipeline within the Common- 
wealth for the transportation of flammable liquids. 

Product line leak detector, a device designed to 
detect product or pressure losses in a pressurized 
product line of a remote pumping station. 



p.s.i., pounds per square inch gauge. 

Qualified person, a representative certified by the 
manufacturer of the product being installed or 
tested. 

Remote pumping system, a pressurized product 
line system in which flammable liquids are sup- 
plied to a point away from the tank by means of 
a pumping unit. 

Replacement and substantial modification, a 

construction of any additions to an existing 
storage facility, or any restoration, reburbishment, 
or renovation which significantly impairs or affects 
the physical integrity of the storage facility or its 
monitoring system. 

Secondary containment or equivalent protec- 
tion, techniques that may include impervious 
liners, double- walled tanks, or equivalent methods 
approved by the Marshal. 

Storage facility, one or more tanks at a particular 
site, together with all components thereof, used 
or designed to be used for the storage of any pro- 
duct within the scope of this regulation. 

Tank, any structure either underground or 
aboveground used or designed to be used for the 
storage of any product within the scope of this 
regulation; as well as any aboveground structure 
in excess of 10,000 gallons capacity used or design- 
ed to be used for the storage of any fluid except 
water. 

UL-listed, included in a current list or report of 
approved equipment, materials, or methods 
published by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. 

Underground storage, where 10% or more of the 
tank volume and piping is buried below the 
ground surface but which shall not include storage 
is a freestanding container within a building. 

Water supply, any raw or finished source that is 
presently used, reserved for future use, or under 
investigation for future use by a public water sup- 
ply as defined in 310 CMR 22.02, or used as a 
source of private drinking water by one or more 
persons. This shall include all land and/or waters 
used as a tributary to a public water system ex- 
cept those under 310 CMR 22.22. 

Zone 2 (Zone of Contribution), that area of an 
aquifer which contributes water to a well under 
the most severe recharge and pumping conditions 
that can be realistically anticipated. It is bounded 
by the groundwater divides which result from 
pumping the well and by the contact of the edge 
of the aquifer with less permeable materials such 



39 



as till and bedrock. At some locations, streams and 
lakes may form recharge boundaries. Specific 
criteria for the determination of Zone 2 may be 
obtained from "Guidelines for Public Water 
Systems" by the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Quality Engineering, Division of 
Water Supply. 



2. Dikes and Fire Protection for Aboveground 
Tanks 

1 . The Commission or head of the Fire Depart- 
ment or his designee may require any tank to 
be enclosed by a substantial dike constructed 
of metal, earth, clay or reinforced concrete, 
to be no higher than half the height of the 
highest tank enclosed, forming a retaining 
basin not less than the capacity of the largest 
tank plus 10% of the aggregate capacity of all 
other tanks within the enclosure. 

2. A dike surrounding a tank containing fluid 
susceptible to boilover shall form a retaining 
basin having a capacity of not less than 125% 
of the capacity of the tank or group of tanks 
surrounded. Unless means are available for 
extinguishing a fire in a tank, dikes and walls 
enclosing tanks containing fluid susceptible to 
boilover shall be provided at the top with a 
flareback section designed to turn back a 
boilover wave. 

3. The total gallonage of a group of tanks to be 
enclosed in any one diked area shall not ex- 
ceed 6,300,000 gallons, and any single tank 
in excess of this amount shall be separately 
diked. 

4. Such an embankment or dike shall be made 
of clay-core gravel fill, masonry, reinforced 
concrete, or other approved material. An ear- 
thwork embankment or dike shall be firmly 
and compactly built of clean earth from which 
stones, vegetable matter, etc., have been 
removed and shall have a flat top not less than 
3 feet in width and slope at least IV2 ' to 1 ' on 
both sides. Small tanks with capacities not 
over 25,000 gallons each may be grouped and 
an embankment or dike built around the 
group of tanks. Embankments or dikes shall 
be continuous with no openings for piping or 
roadways. Piping shall be laid over or under 
the embankments or dikes. 

5. No building shall be located within the diked 
area. 

6. The Commissioner or head of the Fire Depart- 
ment or his designee may require any tank to 
be provided with such connections for fire ex- 



tinguishing purposes as he may deem 
necessary. 

7. First-aid fire control appliances shall be pro- 
vided in such quantity and so located as the 
head of the fire department may prescribe. 

3. Underground Piping 

1 . All new and replacement piping shall be in- 
stalled with secondary containment which 
may include impervious liners, double- walled 
piping, or equivalent methods approved by 
the Marshal. If a suction system is used with 
a check valve under the dispensing pump and 
the piping is pitched to the tank, secondary 
containment of new or replacement piping 
shall not be required. (Reference: 527 CMR 
9.11 (3). 

2. All new or replacement piping shall be con- 
structed of noncorrodible materials such as 
fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) or its 
equivalent, or shall be protected agaist cor- 
rosion by the use of a steel system cathodically 
protected by impressed current or sacrificial 
anodes or by some other type of equivalent 
protection. (Reference: 527 CMR 9.15 (6). 

3. Product lines shall be installed in a trench bet- 
ween the tank area and the pump island. 
Similarly, underground vent lines shall be in- 
stalled in a trench. 

4. Before underground piping is installed, the 
trench shall receive a minimum 6-inch deep 
bed of well-compacted non-corrosive material 
such as clean washed sand or gravel. All tren- 
ches shall be wide enough to permit at least 
6 inches of noncorrosive backfill material 
around all lines. 

5. All pipes connected to such tanks shall lead 
from the tops of tanks, and the tops of all 
tanks shall be below the level of the lowest 
horizontal pipe used in the connection therein 
except where the design specifically prevents 
a possible syphoning condition with the ap- 
proval of the head of the fire department. 

6. All pipes used for the conveyance of flam- 
mable liquid shall decline to tanks without 
traps or pockets, and shall be protected 
against injury. Piping drops from submerged 
pumps to allow piping decline to the tank shall 
not be considered a trap 

7. Underground copper piping or tubing shall 
not be used on new or replacement piping in- 
stallations unless the copper piping or tubing 
is adequately protected against physical dam- 



40 



age and protected from corrosion. Copper 
piping or tubing shall only be allowed for use 
as a product line when installed in an installa- 
tion covered by 527 CMR 4.00. 

8. At marine fueling facilities where tanks are at 
an elevation which produces a gravity head 
on the dispensing unit, the tank outlet shall 
be equipped with a device, such as a solenoid 
valve, positioned adjacent to. and down- 
stream, so installed and adjusted that liquid 
cannot flow by gravity from the tank in case 
of piping or hose failure when the dispenser 
is not in use. 

9. A double elbow swing joint or flexible con- 
nector shall be installed at all locations where 
piping changes direction from horizontal to 
vertical or from vertical to horizontal. 

4. Underground Tank Installation 

1 . No new or replacement tank or piping shall 
be installed, whether as part of a new or ex- 
isting storage facility, unless the owner has 
given notice of its installation to the head of 
the fire department: and no new or replace- 
ment tank or piping shall be buried or con- 
cealed until it has been inspected for damage 
and external defects, and has been approved 
by the head of the fire department or his 
designee. A tightness test on all new or 
replacement tanks and piping shall be done 
after the installing, backfilling and surfacing 
to grade have been completed, this test shall 
be of both the tank and the piping. 

2. No new or replacement tank shall be install- 
ed except by a contractor who has been cer- 
tified in writing by the manufacturer or a 
petroleum equipment association as qualified 
for the purpose. The conractor shall, prior to 
any installation, submit to the head of the fire 
department a copy of such certificate. 

3 . The installation of a new or replacement tank, 
including anchoring of the tank, shall be car- 
ried out in accordance with the manufac- 
turer's recommendation, accepted engineer- 
ing practices, and the provisions of 527 CMR 
9.10. provided that the backfill material for 
FRP 'fiberglass reinforced plastic) tanks shall 
be pea gravel or crushed stone and the backfill 
material for all other tanks shall be either pea 
gravel or clean noncorrosive sand free of 
cinders, stones, and any other foreign material 
with the material under the tank to be com- 
pacted and the balance to be placed in 
uniform lifts and to be thoroughly compacted. 



4. Any damage to the exeterior of the tank or 
its coating shall be repaired before the tank 
is covered. 

5. Every new or replacement tank and its pip- 
ing shall be tested separately, at the owner's 
expense, prior to its being buried. The tank 
shall be tested by air pressure not less than 
3 lbs. and not more than 5 lbs. per square 
inch. The piping shall be tested hydrostatically 
(or by air pressure) to 150% of the maximum 
anticipated pressure of the system but not less 
than 50 lbs. per square inch gauge at the 
highest point of the system. After the tank and 
piping have been fully buried, all subsequent 
testing of the underground tanks shall be done 
in accordance with the provisions of Pamphlet 
No. 329 Chapter 4-3.11 of the National Fire 
Protection Association, or other test equiva- 
lent or superior accuracy. The owner shall fur- 
nish the head of the fire department with a 
certified copy of all testing required by 527 
CMR 9.13 which the fire department shall 
keep with the records of the storage facility. 

6. Steel tanks completely underground shall be 
covered with a minimum of 2 feet of earth or 
shall be covered with not less than one foot 
of earth, on top of which shall be placed a slab 
of reinforced concrete not less than 4 inches 
thick. When they are or are likely to be sub- 
jected to traffic, they shall be protected 
against damage from vehicles passing over 
them by at least 3 feet of earth cover, or 18 
inches of well-tamped earth plus 6 inches of 
reinforced concrete or 8 inches of asphaltic 
concrete. When asphaltic or reinforced con- 
crete paving is used as part of the protection, 
it shall extend at least one foot horizontally 
beyond the outline of the tank in all 
directions. 

7. An underground storage tank used for the 
storage of a Class A flammable liquid, if 
within 10 feet of a building having a cellar or 
basement shall be placed below the level of 
the floor of such cellar or basement. 

Leak Detection Equipment, Testing and/or In- 
ventory Requirements for Underground Tanks 

1 . Fuel oil tanks used exclusively for consump- 
tive use. waste oil tanks, and hazardous waste 
tanks shall be exempt from 527 CMR 9. 11(2), 
9.12. and 9.13 (Reference: 527 CMR 5.00. and 
310 CMR 30.00 "Hazardous Waste 
Regulations"). 

2. All other tanks shall satisfy one of the three 
following options. 



41 



a. Mandatory inventory record keeping as 
defined in 527 CMR 9.12 in addition to 
periodic tightness testing as defined in 527 
CMR 9.13. 

b. The installation and maintenance of an 
approved in-tank monitoring system in- 
stalled and maintained by a qualified 
person. 

i. The operator shall prepare, recon- 
cile, and maintain daily inventory 
control records for each tank and for 
every combination of intercon- 
nected tanks. This inventory shall be 
taken by the use of the in-tank 
monitor for the purpose of preven- 
tion and early detection of leaks. 
(Reference: 527 CMR 9.12) 

ii. At the close of each calendar month, 
the operator shall use the in-tank 
monitor over a continuous period of 
six hours to determine any loss of 
product. A loss of 0.10 gallons per 
hour or more over a six-hour period 
with the probability of detection of 
0.99 and a probability of false alarm 
of 0.01 shall constitute a leak. 

ill. If the above-mentioned procedure is 
followed and the tank is considered 
tight, then the requirements for 
tank tightness testing in 527 CMR 
9.13 shall be considered as being 
complete. 

iv. At the end of each calendar month, 
the operator shall take a measure- 
ment to determine if any water has 
enetered the underground storage 
tank. This measurement shall be re- 
corded and any excess of water shall 
be removed. (Reference: 527 CMR 
9.12) 

c. The installation of an approved double- 
walled tank, an interstitial space monitor- 
ing system, and liquid removal port. 

i. This installation shall be exempt 
from the requirements of tank tight- 
ness testing in 527 CMR 9.13 provid- 
ed that the continuous monitor is in- 
stalled and maintained by a 
qualified person. 

ii. If the monitor activates, whether a 
trouble or an alarm mode, the 
owner or operator shall immediate- 
ly notify the local fire department. 



iii. At the close of each calendar month, 
the operator shall take a measure- 
ment to determine, if any water has 
entered the underground storage 
tank. This measurement shall be re- 
corded and any excess of water shall 
be removed. 'Reference: 527 CMR 
9.12) 

3. Double- walled tanks with an approved in- 
terstitial space monitoring system as well as 
piping with secondary containment shall be 
required for new or replacement tanks and 
piping when a sole source aquifer area 
designated by the U.S. Environmental Protec- 
tion Agency is underlying the location. All 
new or replacement piping shall be con- 
tinuously monitored for product loss. 

4. The owner and/or oper ator of every storage 
facility shall keep all records of cathodic pro- 
tection monitoring, leak detection monitor- 
ing, inventory records, and any other records 
required by this regulation for the remaining 
operating life of the facility. These records 
shall be made readily available upon request 
of the Office of the State Fire Marshal and/or 
the head of the fire department or his 
designee. 

6. Inventory Methods for Underground Tanks 

1. The operator of every new and existing 
storage facility shall prepare, reconcile and 
maintain daily inventory records for each tank 
and for each combination of interconnected 
tanks with a common level of product < here- 
inafter, a combination), for the purpose of 
prevention and early detection of leaks. The 
preparation, reconciliation, and maintenance 
of such records shall be done in accordance 
with the provisions of 527 CMR 5.05 (3) as 
amended, with the following additions and 
modification: 

a. At the close of each calendar month, the 
operator shall determine, for that month 
and for each tank or combination, the 
number of days in which any amount of 
product was dispensed and the number 
of days in which a loss of product was 
recorded. These records shall include the 
inspection details on monitoring wells and 
leak detection systems. 

b. An abnormal loss of product for any tank 
or combination shall mean a loss not ex- 
plainable by spillage, temperature varia- 
tions or other causes, in excess of 0.5% 
of the volume of product dispenses over 
a period of a calendar month. (Reference: 



42 



API Publication 1621, Third Edition, 1977 
as provided in 527 CMR 5.05 (3) (d). 

c. In the event of any abormal loss of pro- 
duct, the following steps shall be taken, 
with the investigation not to stop until the 
discrepancy has been found, the tank has 
been tested, repaired or replaced, or the 
entire procedure has been completed. 

i. Inventory input and output records 
shall be checked by the owner of the 
tank for arithmetical error. 

ii. Inventory shall be checked by the 
owner of the tank for error in 
measurement. 

iii. If the abnormal loss is not recon- 
cilable by steps (i) and (ii) or cannot 
be affirmatively demonstrated to be 
the result of theft, the accessible 
parts of the storage system shall be 
checked for damage or leaks. 

iv. Monitoring wells and leak detection 
systems shall be checked for signs of 
a discharge. 

v. Calibration of the inventory measur- 
ing system and any dispensers shall 
be checked. 

vi. The entire storage system, exlcuding 
the vent but including joints and 
remote fill lines, shall be tested in 
accordance with the applicable sec- 
tions of 527 CMR 9.00. 

vii. If a discharge, leak, or threat of 
release is discovered, the re- 
quirements of the applicable sec- 
tions of 527 CMR 9.20 shall be met 
by the owner of the tank. 

d . An abnormal gain of water shall be a gain 
in the water level inside any tank of more 
than one inch in a 24-hour period. 

e. In the event of any abnormal gain of 
water, the owner shall at the owner's ex- 
pense, have the water removed from the 
tank and disposed of in a manner as 
directed by the Department of En- 
vironmental Quality Engineering (DEQE) 
and have the water checked 24 hours later 
during which time no product shall be 
added. 

f . Apart from abnormal gains of water, the 
owner of any tank in which water has ac- 



cumulated to a depth of 3 inches or more 
shall at the owners' expense, have the 
water removed and disposed of in a man- 
ner as directed by DEQE. 

g. For every storage facility covered by the 
inventory control requirements of 527 
CMR 9.12, the operator shall maintain 
record on the premises available for in- 
spection by any member of the Depart- 
ment of Public Safety or the head of the 
fire department or his designee, in accor- 
dance with 527 CMR 5.05 (3) (a) ; and the 
inventory records shall be kept on the 
premises for a minimum of the prior 12 
months, in accordance with 527 CMR 
5.05 (3) (b). 

2 . The negative voltage of every cathodic protec- 
tion system equipped with a test wire and/or 
box that is part of the facility shall be record- 
ed, inspected and tested by a qualified per- 
son at least annually. If any such system does 
not have adequate negative voltage or is 
otherwise defective, the owner shall have the 
system repaired promptly by a qualified per- 
son. For purposes of this subsection, the term 
"adequate negative voltage" shall mean a 
negative voltage of at least -0.85 volts if a 
copper-copper sulfate reference electrode is 
used, and of at least +0.25 volts if a sine 
reference electrode is used when measured in 
accordance with NACE RP-0 1-69-83 criteria 
and its most recent revision, or other criteria 
contained in NACE RP-0 1-69-83. If an elec- 
trical impressed current corrosion protection 
system has been installed, it shall be operated 
and maintained by a person with sufficient 
training and experience to insure that no 
release occurs during the operating life. All 
impressed current systems shall be inspected 
every sixty (60) days to insure that the equip- 
ment is operating properly. 

3. For failure to comply with 527 CMR 9. 12, see 
9.13 (6). 

Testing for Tightness of Underground Storage 
Facilities 

1. The owner of every new or existing storage 
facility shall have all new or replacement pip- 
ing tested, at the owner's expense, in accor- 
dance with this section during a period of 
12-24 months after the date of installation. 

2. If any testing discloses a leak or a loss which 
is not reconcilable, the operator and the 
owner shall comply immediately with the re- 
quirements of 527 CMR 9.20, and the head 
of the fire department may direct the owner, 



43 



at the owner's expense, to have all other tanks 
on the premises and their components tested 
in the same manner. 

3. The owner of every existing storage tank 
which does not have an acceptable form of 
leak detection (Ref: 527 CMR 9.24 (4)), but 
which does have a spill containment manhole 
and an overfill prevention device shall have 
the tank tested at the owner's expense dur- 
ing the 5th, 10th, and 15th year after installa- 
tion and at five year intervals thereafter until 
1998. 

4. The owner of every existing storage tank 
which does not have an acceptable form of 
leak detection (Ref: 527 CMR 9.24 (4)), and 
which does not have a spill containment man- 
hole and an overfill prevention devise shall 
have the tank tightness tested at the owner's 
expense on an annual basis until 1998. 

5. Every existing suction piping system not of 
European design shall either have secondary 
containment with an approved interstitial 
space monitoring system or shall be tested 
during the 3rd, 6th, and 9th year after installa- 
tion and at three year intervals thereafter. 

6. With respect to any tank to which the inven- 
tory control requirements of 527 CMR 9.12 
are applicable, the head of the fire department 
shall require the operator to have it and its 
piping promptly tested, at the owner's ex- 
pense, whenever the operator fails to prepare, 
reconcile, and maintain the daily inventory 
records or fails to perform the required mon- 
thly calculations. 

7. The head of the fire department may require 
the owner of any existing tank to have it and 
its pipiing tested, at the owner's expense, in 
any case in which the owner has failed to 
make timely application for a permit as re- 
quired under 527 CMR 9.26. 

8. Except for testing performed on a tank and 
its piping prior to their being covered, a tank 
shall be tested by any final or precision test 
not involving air pressure which can accur- 
ately detect a leak of 0.10 gallons per hour 
with a probability of detection of 0.99, and a 
probability of false alarm of 0.01, and which 
has been approved by the Marshal. 

9. All tests shall be approved and administered 
by qualified persons, and any such persons 
shall notify the head of the fire department 
prior to administering a test. 



10. The owner of every existing pressurized pip 
ing system which is not monitored through 
the use of soil monitors at the end of every 
calendar month minimum shall have the pip- 
ing tested, at the owner's expense, on an an- 
nual basis. 

11. Every existing pressurized piping system 
which has secondary containment and an ap- 
proved interstitial space monitor shall be ex- 
empt from tightness testing of the piping. 

12. The person performing any test under 527 
CMR 9.13 shall promptly supply the owner 
and the head of the fire department with cer- 
tified copies of all test results for a tank and 
its piping. The head of the fire department 
shall keep his copy with the records of that 
storage facility. 

8. Response to leaks 

1 . In the event of a leak, whether determined by 
testing or otherwise, the following steps shall 
be taken: 

a. The operator shall immediately notify the 
owner. 

b. The owner or operator shall immediately 
notify the head of the local fire depart- 
ment and the Office of Incident Response 
of the Department of Environmental 
Quality Engineering (OIR-DEQE). 

c. If testing has confirmed that the source 
of the leak is the piping for a particular 
tank, the operator shall take that tank out 
of service immediately. 

d. If testing has confirmed that the source 
of the leak is a particular tank, the owner 
shall within 24 hours cause that tank to 
be emptied of all its product. 

9. Tanks Abandoned or Temporarily Out of 
Service 

1 . If the owner decides to abandon a tank which 
is either located under a building and cannot 
be removed from the ground without first 
removing the building or which is so located 
that it cannot be removed from the ground 
without endangering the structural integrity 
of another tank, the owner shall notify the 
head of the fire department of this condition. 
After verification that such condition so ex- 
ists, the owner shall have all product removed 
from the tank, by hand pump if necessary, 
under the direction of the head of the fire 



44 



department, and shall have the tank filled 
with a concrete slurry mix or any other inert 
material approved by the Marshal for this 
purpose. 

2. Except as provided in 527 CMR 9.22 (1), no 
tank may be abandoned in place. Any owner 
of a tank who has decided to abandon it and 
any owner of a tank which has been out of 
service for a period of time constituting aban- 
donment as defined in 527 CMR 9.02, shall 
immediately obtain a permit from the head of 
the fire department pursuant to M.G.L. c. 
148, s. 38A, and, subject to the directions of 
the head of the fire department, shall have 
any product removed from the tank, all open- 
ings properly secured, and the tank removed 
from the ground. The product and tank shall 
be disposed of in accordance with 310 CMR 
30.00 "Hazardous Waste Regulations, ' ' at the 
owner's expense, as directed by the head of 
the fire department. 

3. The owner of every tank licensed under 
M.G.L. c. 148, which the owner has decided 
to take out of service for a period of less than 
six months, shall promptly notify the head of 
the fire department of the decision, shall have 
all product removed from the tank and dis- 
posed of in accordance with 310 CMR 30.00 
"Hazardous Waste Regulations, ' ' as directed 
by the head of the fire department, and shall 
have all openings properly secured and the 
tank rendered inert. Before any such tank may 
be restored to service, the owner of the tank 
shall notify the head of the fire department, 
who may require that the owner have the tank 
and its piping tested, at the owner's expense, 
in accordance with the provisions of 527 CMR 
9.13 (8), (9), and (10) 

10. Tank Removal 

1 . Any person granted a permit by the Marshal 
or the head of the fire department to remove 
a tank under the provisions of M.G.L. c. 148 
or 527 CMR 9.00, shall within 72 hours pro- 
vide the permit-granting authority with a 
receipt for delivery of said tank to the site 
designated on the permit 

2. Before any person is granted a permit by the 
Marshal or the head of the fire department to 
remove a tank under the provisions of M.G.L. 
c. 148, or 527 CMR 9.00, and said tank is not 
being transported to an approved tank yard, 
the person requesting the permit shall provide 
the permit-granting authority with written ap- 
proval for the designated site of disposition. 
(Reference: 502 CMR 3.00 for tank removal 
and disposal procedures) 



1 1 . Inspection 

Any person appying for a permit to remove one 
(1) or more tanks which have an individual capaci- 
ty greater than 2,000 gallons shall be required to 
have a Chelmsford Fire Department Firefighter on 
the site observing a tank removal. The Firefighter 
must be on site from the time the tank is un- 
covered until the tank has left the site for proper 
disposal. The Firefighter will be paid detail rate 
by the person applying for the permit through the 
town of Chelmsford and will be paid a minimum 
detail of 4 hours. A minimum notice of 12 hours 
shall be required for this detail. 

12. Upgrading of Existing Underground Storage 
Tank Systems 

1. Fuel oil tanks utilized exclusively for con- 
sumptive use on the premises shall be exempt 
from the requirements of 527 CMR 9.24 (4) 
through (13). 

2. all existing underground storage tanks shall 
be retrofitted with a spill containment man- 
hole and an overfill prevention device on or 
before May 30, 1993 unless the storage tank 
is required to be upgraded with Stage II Vapor 
recovery in accordancec with 310 CMR 7.00 
before that date. On all tanks which are re- 
quired to implement Stage II Vapor recovery 
before May 30, 1993 a spill containment man- 
hole and an overfill prevention device shall be 
installed and operational on the date Stage II 
Vapor recovery is to be in effect in accordance 
with 310 CMR 7.00. Fuel oil tanks of 1,100 
gallons or less capacity utilized exclusively for 
consumptive use on the premises shall be ex- 
empt from the retrofit of a spill containment 
manhole, provided the tank was installed 
before January 1, 1989. 

3 . An overfill prevention device shall be designed 
so as not to preclude the ability to perform any 
required tightness test on the tank and pip- 
ing. The following options are acceptable: 

a. A device which shall automatically shut 
off flow into the tank when the tank is no 
more than 95 percent (95%) full. 

b. A device which shall alert the individual 
delivering product when the tank is no 
more than 90 percent (90%) full by restric- 
ting the flow into the tank or triggering 
a high-level alarm. 

4. All tanks shall be equipped with leak detec- 
tion. The following methods are acceptable: 



45 



b. 



A double-walled tank with an approved 
interstitial space monitor. 

An approved in-tank monitor which shall 
be utilized in accordance with 527 CMR 
9.11 (2) (b). 



The following schedule shall be required for the 
upgrade of leak detection on existing underground 
storage tanks. If this schedule is not complied 
with, see 527 CMR 9.24 (5), (6) and (7). 



IF THE TANK WAS 

INSTALLED 

Before 1969 or unknown 
1970-1974 
1975-1979 
1980-Dec. 1988 



LEAK DETECTION 
REQUIRED BY 12/22 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 



5. If the tank does not have leak detection in- 
stalled, in accordance with the above- 
mentioned upgrade schedule, but has a spill 
containment manhole, overfill prevention 
device, and cathodic protection, the tank shall 
be tightness tested during the 5th, 10th, and 
15th year after installation, and at five-year 
intervals until 1998. 

6. If the tank does not have leak detection in- 
stalled in accordance with the schedule in 527 
CMR 9.24 (4) and does not have a spill con- 
tainment manhole, overfill prevention device, 
and cathodic prevention, the tank shall be 
tightness tested on an annual basis until 1998. 

7. If the tank does not have leak detection in- 
stalled by December 22, 1998, the 
owner/operator shall have the tank removed 
from the ground on or before December 22, 
1998. 

8. All pressurized piping shall meet one of the 
following requirements by December 22, 
1990: 



a. 



b. 



If the piping has secondary containment, 
an approved interstitial space monitor 
may be used. 

An automatic flow resistrictor, an 
automatic shutoff device, or a continuous 
alarm system shall be installed. These 
devices shall accurately detect a leak of 
three gallons per hour with the probability 
of detection of 0.99 and a probability of 
false alarm of 0.01. If this option is util- 
ized, the piping shall be required to be 
tightness tested on an annual basis, or 
monthly monitoring for vapors in the soil 
shall be performed and documented. 



9. If a European Suction System is used, leak 
detection is not required on the piping. 

10. If a suction system is used which is not a Euro- 
pean Suction System, one of the following leak 
detection options shall be required for the 
piping: 



a. 



b. 



If the piping has secondary containment, 
an approved interstitial space monitor 
shall be used. 

A tightness test shall be conducted every 
three years. 



11. 



If the facility has unprotected steel tanks 
and/or piping, they shall be retrofitted with 
cathodic protection by December 22, 1998. 
Until cathodic protection has been added, an 
annual tightness test shall be required if the 
tank and/or piping do not have cathodic pro- 
tection by December 22, 1998 the owner /oper- 
ator shall have the tank and piping removed 
from the ground or or before December 22, 
1998. 



12. A tightness test shall be done on both the tank 
and piping within one month before adding 
cathodic protection as well as six to twelve 
months after cathodic protection has been 
added. 

13. The provisions of 527 CMR 9.26 (4) shall be 
complied with when adding any of the above- 
mentioned devices. 

14. Written notification shall be given to the head 
of the fire department before upgrading 
begins clearly describing what devices will be 
installed. 

13. Permits 

1 . Either the original or photographic copy of all 
permits granted under the provisions of 527 
CMR 9.00 shall be conspicuously posted or 
kept on the premises. 

2. New Storage Facilities: 

a. No storage facility shall be installed unless 
the owner shall first have obtained a per- 
mit from the head of the fire department. 
This permit shall be in addition to any 
license or any other permit required by 
M.G.L. c. 148, or by any regulations 
issued thereunder. 

b. The application for a permit shall be on 
a form obtained from the head of the fire 



46 



department and shall include the follow- 
ing information and any other informa- 
tion he or the Department may require: 

i. Name, address, and telephone 
numbers (day and night) of the 
owner. 

ii. Name, address and telephone 
numbers (day and night) of the 
operator. 

iii. The number of tanks in the propos- 
ed facility and the capacity of each 
proposed tank. 

iv. The proposed type of construction 
of each tank and its piping, together 
with the tank's approval number if 
any, and a description of any provi- 
sions made for cathodic protection, 
electrical isolation, and early detec- 
tion of leaks through a monitoring 
system. 

v. The depth below ground level of the 
lowest and highest points of each 
proposed tank. 

c. In a storage facility with more than one 
proposed tank, the applicant shall furnish 
the head of the fire department with a cer- 
tificate signed by a qualified person 
stating that the proposed facility meets all 
the design requirements of 527 CMR 9.00. 

d . The applicant shall also furnish a plot plan 
of the site and the area surrounding it, 
showing the location of each proposed 
tank and its components and of any 
building on the site, the approximate 
location of any public or private well and 
of any body of surface water within 500 
feet of the proposed storage facility. 

e. The head of the fire department may re- 
quire secondary containment or equiva- 
lent protection for new installtions where 
groundwater below the facility is within 
Zone II (Zone of Contribution) of muni- 
cipal water wells, or where private potable 
water wells or a water supply reservoir is 
within 300 feet of the bank installation. 

3. Existing Storage Facilities: 



a. 



The owner of every underground storage 
facility installed prior to May 9, 1986, 
shall apply to the head of the fire depart- 
ment for a permit to maintain the storage 
facility. Application shall be made on 



forms obtained from the head of the fire 
department. 

b. The applicant shall furnish a plot plan to 
scale of the facility site and the area sur- 
rounding it, showing the location of each 
tank and its components and of any build- 
ing on the site, and the approximate loca- 
tion of any public or private well and of 
any body of surface water within 500 feet 
of the storage facility. Legend notes shall 
include, to the extent available to the 
owner, the following information and any 
other information required by the head 
of the fire department. 

i. Name, address, and telephone 
numbers (day and night) of the 
owner. 

ii. Name, address, and telephone 
numbers (day and night) of the 
operator. 

iii. The number of tanks in the facility 
and the capacity and contents of 
each tank. 

iv. The type of construction for each 
tank and its piping, together with a 
description of any provisions made 
for cathodic protection, electrical 
isolation, and early detection of 
leaks through a monitoring system. 

v. The date of installation of each tank. 

c. The owner shall furnish evidence of the 
date of installation. Such evidence may in- 
clude, but is not limited to, a copy of any 
license or permit issued by the local licen- 
sing authority and the head of the fire 
department. If no substantial evidence of 
the date of installation is supplied, the 
tank shall be presumed to have been in- 
stalled 20 years prior to May 8, 1986. 

d. The following storage facilities shall be 
exempt: 

i. Farm or residential tanks of 1100 
gallons capacity or less used for stor- 
ing motor fuel for noncommercial 
purposes. 

ii. Residential or commercial tanks 
storing or having stored heating oil 
(fuel oil) for consumptive use on the 
premises. 



47 



e. The filing deadline for a permit to main- 
tain an existing storage facility is May 8, 
1986. 

4. Replacement or Substantial Modification: 

a. There shall be no replacement of a tank 
or its components or substantial modifica- 
tion of any storage facility unless the 
owner has first applied for and obtained 
approval in writing from the head of the 
fire department who shall keep a copy of 
his approval with the records for that 
storage facility. 

b. Any application for approval under 527 
CMR 9.26 (4) shall be in writing and shall 
clearly describe the type of construction 
of any replacement tank or component of 
the modification that is proposed. 

c. Any application to add cathodic protec- 
tion to an existing storage facility using 
one or more steel tanks shall be accom- 
panied by a design plan prepared by cor- 
rosion expert which plan is to include pro- 
visions for a test box to allow measure- 
ment of electrical potential and current 
flow. 

d. If the head of the fire department deter- 
mines that the proposed replacement or 
modification constitutes a danger to a 
public or private well, aquifer, recharge 
area or body of surface water, or for any 
other reason, the head of the fire depart- 
ment may deny the application or ap- 
prove it subject to conditions that he may 
deem necessary to protect such public or 
private water supply. 

e. No replacement or substantial modifica- 
tion shall be made except by a contractor 
who has been certified by the manufac- 
turer as qualified for that purpose. 

f. The head of the fire department may re- 
quire that existing tanks other than those 
used for heating purposes shall be equip- 
ped with observation wells or other detec- 
tion systems if in his opinion the location 
of the tanks could jeopardize safety of the 
public. 

5. Renewal of Permits and Changes of 
Ownership: 

a. The owner of any new or existing facility 
for which a permit has been issued under 
527 CMR 9.26 (2) and (3) must apply to 
the head of the fire department for 



renewal of the permit at 5-year intervals 
from the date on which the original per- 
mit was granted. The application for 
renewal must include any changes re- 
quired under 527 CMR 9.26 (1) (b) and 
(2) (a) . No application for renewal may be 
denied except for violations of 527 CMR 
9.00 and in accordance with the pro- 
cedural requirements of 527 CMR 9.25 
(2). 

b. The owner of any storage facility shall 
within seven working days notify the head 
of the fire department of any changes in 
the name, address, or telephone numbers 
of the owner or of the operator. In the 
case of any transfer of ownership, the new 
owner shall be responsible for the 
notification of this transfer. 

14 . Installation of Aboveground Waste Oil Storage 
Tanks 

1. Permanent Storage Outside a Building 

a. Shall be limited to five hundred (500) 
gallon capacity if the tank is adjacent to 
a building or other structure) . For quan- 
tities in excess of 500 gallons capacity, the 
tank(s) shall be located a minimum of 
twenty-five feet (25 ') from any building or 
structure and shall require a license in ac- 
cordance with M.G.L. c. 148, s. 13, in ad- 
dition to a permit from the head of the 
fire department. 

b. Shall require a permit to install, maintain, 
and store from the head of the fire depart- 
ment. 

c. Shall be located at least five feet (5 ') from 
any building openings. 

d. Shall have a containment dike capable of 
containing one hundred ten percent 
(110%) of the capacity of all product 
within the dike. 

e. The tanks, based upon the building's oc- 
cupancy, shall be protected against 
damage from vehicular traffic. The type 
of protection shall be steel posts, I-beams, 
or similar protection at the discretion of 
the head of the fire department. 

f. For security purposes, a fence or an 
enclosure capable of being locked shall be 
erected to prevent unauthorized filling of 
the tank. If the tank does not have a fence 
or enclosure, the fill shall be capable of 
being locked. 



48 



g. The tanks shall be vented and the vents 
shall be a minimum of IV2" in diameter. 
Vents shall terminate not less than twelve 
feet (12') above the adjacent ground level 
and shall be so located that vapors will not 
be trapped by eaves or other obstructions 
and shall be at least five feet (5') from any 
building opening. 

h. The tank fill shall be located on the top 
of the tank and be a minimum of Vh" in 
diameter. 

i. The fill shall be a funnel-type hopper fill 
large enough to prevent dripping and 
spillage when filling. The funnel-type hop- 
per shall have a tight-fitting hinged or 
chained cap which shall be closed when 
not in use. 

j. The port used for pumping out the tank 
shall be located on the top of the tank. 
The fill and the port used for pumping out 
shall not be the same port. 

k. The support for waste oil tanks shall be 
of noncombustible material and capable 
of supporting the superimposed load; and 
the tank shall be secured against settling, 
sliding, or lifting. 

1. All tanks shall be UL-listed and shall con- 
form to the design criteria in 527 CMR 
9.00. 

m. Each tank in which hazardous waste is be- 
ing accumulated shall be clearly marked 
and labeled throughout the period of ac- 
cumulation with the folloiwng: 

1. The words "HAZARDOUS 
WASTE." 

2. The hazardous waste identified in 
words (e.g., WASTe OIL). 

3. The type of hazard associated with 
the waste indicated in words (e.g., 
TOXIC). 

4. The date on which each period of 
accumulation begins in that tank. 

NOTE: Marks and labels shall be placed 
on the sides of each tank in such a man- 
ner that they are clearly visible for 
inspection. 

n. Underlying all aboveground tanks in 
which hazardous waste is accumulated 
shall be a surface that is designed and at 
all times operated so that it's free of cracks 
and gaps and is sufficiently impervious to 
contain leaks, spills, and accumulated 



precipitation until the collected hazardous 
waste tanks shall be placed so that all the 
surface beneath each such tank can be in- 
spected for spills and structural initegrity. 

o. The tank shall have a heavy protective 
coating of some rust-resisting material. 

p. All tanks and associated piping shall be 
installed by a qualified person. This shall 
include certified burner technicians as 
well as licensed petroleum system 
installers. 

q. Waste oil tanks shall be tested by the 
manufacturer for tightness by being sub- 
jected to five pounds (5 lbs.) pressure, and 
shall have securely affixed thereto a metal 
tag certifying such test and which has 
legibly indicated thereon the maker's 
name. 

r. The head of the fire department may 
allow for alternative means of compliance 
provided the design is satisfactory and 
complies with the intent of this and other 
applicable regulations. 

2. Permanent Storage Inside a Building 

a. Shall be limited to five hundred (500) 
gallons capacity. 

b. Shall require a permit to install, maintain, 
store from the head of the fire 
department. 

c. Shall be located at least five feet (5 ') from 
exits. Overhead garage doors shall not be 
considered exits. 

d. Shall have a drip pan or accidental spill 
containment at the discretion of the head 
of the fire department. The drip pan or 
spill containment is for minor spills and 
shall not be considered a dike. No con- 
tainment diking is required. 

e. The tank, based upon the occupancy of 
the building, shall be protected against 
damage from vehicular traffic. The type 
of protection shall be steel posts, I-beams, 
or similar protection at the discretion of 
the head of the fire department. 

f. The tank shall be vented to the outside 
of the building. 

g. Vents shall be a minimum of IV2" in 
diameter. Vents shall terminate not less 
than twelve feet (12') above the adjacent 



49 



ground level and shall be so located that 
vapors will not be trapped by eaves or 
other obstructions and shall be at least 
five feet (5') from any building opening. 

h. The tank fill shall be located on the top 
of the tank and be a minimum of IVi in- 
ches in diameter. 

i. The tank fill shall be a funnel-type hop- 
per fill large enough to prevent dripping 
and spillage when filling. The funnel-type 
hopper shall be a tight-fitting hinged or 
chained cap which shall be closed when 
not in use. 

j . The port used for pumping out the tank 
shall be located on the top of the tank. 
The fill and the port used for pumping out 
shall not be the same port. 

k. The support for waste oil tanks shall be 
of noncombustible material and capable 
of supporting and superimposed load; 
and they think shall be secured against 
settling, sliding or lifting. 

1. All tanks shall be UL-listed and shall con- 
form to the design criteria in 527 CMR 
9.00. 



m. Each tank in which hazardous waste is be- 
ing accumulated shall be clearly marked 
and labeled throughout the period of ac- 
cumulation with the following: 

1. The words "HAZARDOUS 
WASTE." 

2. The hazardous waste identified in 
words (e.g., WASTE OIL). 

3. The type hazard associated with the 
waste indicated in words (e.g., 
TOXIC). 

4. The date on which each period of 
accumulation begins in that tank. 

NOTE: Marks and labels shall be placed 
on the sides of each tank in such a man- 
ner that they are clearly visible for 
inspection. 

n. Underlying all aboveground tanks in 
which hazardous waste is accumulated 
shall be a surface that is designed and at 
all times operated so that it is free or 
cracks and gaps and is sufficiently imper- 
vious to contain leaks and spills until the 
collection material is detected and remov- 
ed. All aboveground hazardous waste 
tanks shall be placed so that all the sur- 



face beneath each such tank can be in- 
spected for spills and structural integrity. 

o. The tank shall have a heavy protective 
coating of some rust-resisting material. 

p. All tanks and associated piping shall be 
installed by a qualified person. This shall 
include certified burner technicians as 
well as licensed petroleum system 
installers. 

q. Waste oil tanks shall be tested by the 
manufacturer for tightness by being sub- 
jected to five pounds (5 lbs.) pressure, and 
shall have securely affixed thereto a metal 
tag certifying such test and which has 
legibly indicated thereon the marker's 
name. 

r. The head of the fire department may 
allow for alternative means of compliance 
provided the design is satisfactory and 
complies with the intent of this and other 
applicable regulations. 

3. Removable Storage Inside a Building 

a. Shall be limited to 165 gallon capacity. 

b. Shall require a permit to install, maintain, 
and store from the head of the fire 
department. 

c. Shall be located as far as possible from ex- 
its. Overhead garage doors shall not be 
considered exits. 

d. Shall have a drip pan or accidental spill 
containment at the discretion of the head 
of the fire department. The drip pan or 
spill containment shall not be considered 
a dike. No containment diking is 
required. 

e. The container (s), based upon the oc- 
cupancy of the building, shall be pro- 
tected against damage from vehicular traf- 
fic. The type protection shall be steel 
posts, I-beams, or similar protection at the 
discretion of the head of the fire 
department. 

f . A funnel-type hopper fill large enough to 
prevent dripping and spillage when filling 
shall be on site and used during filling 
procedures. 

g. At the discretion of the head of the fire 
department, emergency relief venting 
shall be installed on all containers. 



50 



h. When not in use. the container! s) shall be 
capped vapor tight. 

i. Each tank in which hazardous waste is be- 
ing accumulated shall be clearly marked 
and labeled throughout the period of ac- 
cumulation with the following: 

1. The words 'HAZARDOUS 
WASTE. " 

2. The hazardous waste identified in 
words (e.g.. WASTE OIL). 

3 . The type hazard associated with the 
waste indicated in words 'e.g.. 
TOXIC'. 

4. The date on which each period of 
accumulation begins in that tank. 

NOTE: Marks and labels shall be placed 
on the sides of each tank in such a man- 
ner that they are clearly visible for 
inspection. 

j. Underlying all aboveground tanks in 
which hazardous waste is accumulated 
shall be a surface that is designed and at 
all times operated so that it is free of 
cracks and gaps and is sufficiently imper- 
vious to contaiin leaks and spills until the 
collection material is detected and remov- 
ed. All aboveground hazardous waste 
tanks shall be placed so that the surface 
beneath each such tank can be inspected 
for spills and structural integrity. 

k. The location of the removable con- 
tainer's) shall be specified by the head of 
the fire department. 

1. The head of the fire department may 
allow for alternative means of compliance 
provided the design is satisfactory and 
complies with the intent of this and other 
applicable regulations. 

15. Automotive Lubrication Service Centers 

1. The following applies to the storage of flam- 
mable fluids within an automotive lubrication 
service center when the storage is to be in 
tanks installed aboveground. When the quan- 
tities to be stored are in excess of five hun- 
dred <500) gallons aggregate, the following 
rules shall apply. 

a. The aggregate capacity of all aboveground 
storage tanks shall be limited to a max- 
imum of six thousand (6,000) gallons. 

b. No individual tank shall have a capacity 
in excess of one thousand < 1 ,000) gallons. 



c. The maximum amount of waste oil 
storage on the site shall be two thousand 
(2,000) gallons aggregate. 

d. A license shall be required in accordance 
with M.G.L. c. 148. s. 13. 

e. A permit to install, maintain, store shall 
be obtained from the head of the fire 
department. 

f. The tanks shall be located in a separate 
room (known as the storage room) from 
the main work area by a two-hour fire- 
rated concrete block wall or other accept- 
able separation. 

g. The storage room shall be equipped with 
a fixed fire suppression system designed 
and installed in accordance with NFPA 
17. 

h. The entrance to the storage room shall 
have a threshold a minimum of twelve in- 
ches (12") high with a two-hour fire-rated 
door closed when not in use. 

i. The storage room shall be large enough 
to act as a containment dike capable of 
containing one hundred ten percent 
(110%) of the largest tank capacity plus 
ten percent (10%) of the aggregate 
amount of all other tanks. 

j . All tanks shall be vented to the outside of 
the building. Waste oil tank vents shall be 
a minimum of Vh inches in diameter and 
shall terminate not less than twelve feet 
(12') above the adjacent ground level and 
shall be so located that vapors will not be 
trapped by eaves or other obstructions 
and shall be at least five feet (5 ') from any 
building opening. 

k. The support for the tank(s) shall be of 
noncombustible material and capable of 
supporting the superimposed load; and 
the tank shall be secured against settling, 
sliding or lifting. 

1. All tanks shall have a heavy protective 
coating or some rust-resisting material. 
All tanks should be UL-listed and shall 
conform to the design criteria in 527 CMR 
9.00. 

n. All tanks shall be tested by the manu- 
facturer for tightness by being subjected 
to five pounds (5 lbs.) pressure, and shall 
have securely affixed thereto a metal tag 
certifying such test and which has legibly 



51 



indicated thereon the manufacturer's 
name. 

o. All tanks and associated piping shall be 
installed by a qualified person. 

p. Each tank in which hazardous waste is be- 
ing accumulated shall be clearly marked 
and labeled throughout the period of ac- 
cumulation with the following: 

1. The words "HAZARDOUS 
WASTE." 

2. T.ie hazardous waste identified in 
words (e.g., WASTE OIL). 

3. The type hazard associated with the 
waste indicated in words (e.g., 
TOXIC). 

4. The date on which each period of 
accumulation begins, marked on 
each tank at the time accumulation 
begins in that tank. 

NOTE: Marks and labels shall be placed 
on the sides of each tank in such a man- 
ner that they are clearly visible for 
inspection. 

q. Underlying all aboveground tanks in 
which hazardous waste is accumulated 
shall be a surface that is designed and at 
all times operated so that it is free of 
cracks and gaps and is sufficiently imper- 
vious contain leaks and spills until the col- 
lection material is detected and removed . 
All aboveground hazardous waste tanks 
shall be placed so that all the surface 
beneath each such tank can be inspected 
for spills and structural integrity. 

r. The waste oil tank(s) shall be equipped 
with a valve which will close when the 
tank has been filled to within ninety-five 
percent (95%) of its capacity to prevent 
further filling of the tank or shall be 
equipped with an audible high level alarm 
which shall sound when the tank(s) has 
been filled to within ninety-five percent 
(95%) of its capacity. 

s. The basement shall be constructed en- 
tirely of noncombustible materials, in- 
cluding storage racks and platforms. 

t. The basement shall be provided with a 
mechanical ventilation system capable of 
providing a minimum of six air charges 
per hour with duct openings located not 
less than 6 inches nor more than 12 in- 
ches above the floor. 



u. The basement area shall have proper 
means of egress in accordance with the 
Massachusetts State Building Code. 

v. The oil and lube oil pumps and product 
delivery lines shall not be left under pres- 
sure when the lubrication center is not 
open for business unless a protective 
device is installed that will prevent con- 
tinuous pumping of product in the event 
of a line or pipe rupture. 

w. The head of the fire department may 
allow for alternative means of compliance 
provided the design is satisfactory and 
complies with the intent of this and other 
applicable regulations. 

16. Any violation of this section shall be punish- 
able by a fine of two hundred dollars ($200.00) 
for each offense. Each day that a violation con- 
tinues shall constitute a separate offense. 

Section 10 Rules and Regulations 

The Fire Chief may make such rules and regula- 
tions not inconsistent with the provisions of this 
By-Law, as may be necessary to promulgate a 
comprehensive fire safety code. 

Section 11 Administration 

1 . The provisions of this By-Law shall be enforc- 
ed by the Fire Chief or his designee and the 
Fire Chief shall, in addition to any other 
remedy available, have full power to initiate 
non-criminal disposition proceedings as set 
forth in Article I General Provision, Section 
2 of the General By-Laws. 

2. Except for those sections specifying a greater 
penalty, any violation of the provisions of this 
Article shall be punished by a fine of $50.00, 
each day any violation continues shall con- 
stitute a separate offense. 

Section 12 Severability 

It is hereby declared that the provisions of this 
By-Law are severable, and if any provisions of this 
By-Law shall be declared unlawful by a valid judg- 
ment or decree of any court of competent jurisdic- 
tion, such invalidity shall not affect any of the re- 
maining provisions of this By-Law. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28 Selectman Dennis Ready 
moved to withdraw the article. Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch explained due to there being no free cash at hand 
at this time, this article must be withdrawn. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



52 



Seeing that there was no further business at hand, the 
Moderator declared the Annual Town Meeting adjourn- 
ed, sine die. The meeting adjourned at 10:25 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

JUNE 4, 1991 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are here by 
required to notify and warn the Inhabitants of said 
Town who are qualified to vote in Elections to vote at: 

Precinct 1: Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica 
Road 

Precinct 2: Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 
Richardson Road 

Precinct 3: Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 
Richardson Road 

Precinct 4: Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton 
Road 

Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium, 25 Maple 
Road 

Precinct 6: Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton 
Road 

Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School Small Gym- 
nasium, 250 North Road 

Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School Small Gym- 
nasium, 250 North Road 

Precinct 9: Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica 
Road 

On Tuesday, the fourth day of June, 1991, from 12:00 
noon to 8:00 p.m. to vote on the following questions: 

Question No. 1: 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess 
an additional $950,000 in real estate taxes and personal 
property taxes for the purpose of providing additional 
funds for public education for the fiscal year beginning 
July first nineteen hundred and ninety-one? 

YES 
NO 



Question 2: 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess 
an additional $150,000 in real estate taxes and personal 
property taxes for the purpose of providing additional 
funds for Police Department Salaries for the fiscal year 
beginning July first nineteen hundred and ninety-one? 



YES 



NO 



Question No. 3: 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess 
an additional $307,000 in real estate and personal pro- 
perty taxes for the purpose of providing additional 
funds for Fire Department salaries for the fiscal year 
beginning July first nineteen hundred and ninety-one? 



YES 
NO 



Question No. 4: 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess 
an additional $203,500 in real estate and personal pro- 
perty taxes for the purpose of providing additional 
funds for recycling services for the fiscal year beginn- 
ing July first nineteen hundred and ninety-one? 



YES 
NO 



Question No. 5: 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess 
an additional $96,665 in real estate and personal pro- 
perty taxes for the purpose of providing additional 
funds for library salaries ($66, 176) and library expenses 
($30,489) for the fiscal year beginning July first nine- 
teen hundred and ninety-one? 



YES 
NO 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
election. 

Given under our hands this 9th day of May, A.D. 
1991. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
OF TOWN OF CHELSMFORD 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

William R. Logan, Vice Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Clerk 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Roger A. Blomgren 



53 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION JUNE 4, 1991 



QUESTION 1 (SCHOOL) 

BLANKS 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 2 (POLICE) 

BLANKS 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 3 (FIRE) 

BLANKS 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 4 (RECYCLING) 

BLANKS 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 5 (LIBRARY) 

BLANKS 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 



Precl 


Prec2 


Prec3 


Prec4 


Prec5 


Prec6 


Prec7 


Prec8 


Prec9 


TOTAL 


5 


12 


6 


14 


4 


11 


9 


6 


5 


72 


566 


504 


802 


517 


776 


741 


804 


564 


734 


6,008 


502 


508 


465 


541 


478 


571 


489 


512 


483 


4,549 


1,073 


1,024 


1,273 


1,072 


1,258 


1,323 


1,302 


1,082 


1,222 


10,629 


14 


7 


17 


10 


10 


16 


21 


15 


16 


126 


442 


415 


621 


430 


577 


583 


627 


431 


537 


4,663 


617 


602 


635 


632 


671 


724 


654 


636 


669 


5,840 


1,073 


1,024 


1,273 


1,072 


1,258 


1,323 


1,302 


1,082 


1,222 


10,629 


20 


8 


15 


11 


12 


22 


23 


12 


13 


136 


456 


411 


693 


420 


555 


577 


655 


440 


537 


4,744 


597 


605 


565 


641 


691 


724 


624 


630 


672 


5,749 


1,073 


1,024 


1,273 


1,072 


1,258 


1,323 


1,302 


1,082 


1,222 


10,629 


16 


16 


16 


15 


14 


13 


22 


12 


16 


140 


454 


336 


625 


361 


612 


615 


640 


399 


580 


4,622 


603 


672 


632 


696 


632 


695 


640 


671 


626 


5,867 


1,073 


1,024 


1,273 


1,072 


1,258 


1,323 


1,302 


1,082 


1,222 


10,629 


11 


11 


9 


13 


10 


15 


12 


10 


14 


105 


487 


451 


704 


414 


667 


651 


696 


458 


640 


5,168 


575 


562 


560 


645 


581 


657 


594 


614 


568 


5,356 



1,073 1,024 1,273 1,072 1,258 1,323 1,302 1,082 1,222 10,629 



54 



(FALL) ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 21, 1991 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 
PM at the Parker School Cafetorium, by the Moderator 
Dennis E. McHugh. There were 146 Representative 
Town Meeting Members present. 

Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the reading 
of Constable's return of service and posting of the war- 
rant be waived. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, it was so voted unanimously. 

Sel moved that the reading 

of the emue Avairant be waived. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, it was so voted unanimously. 

The Moderator asked for a vote from the Town Meet- 
ing Representatives to allow non-residents to speak from 
time to time, Bernard Meyler, Town Accountant, Mary 
Mahoney, Director of the Library, and a Representa- 
tive from Weston and Sampson. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, it was so voted unanimously. 



The Moderator went over the Town Meeting pro- 
cedures. He asked the Representatives to write down 
any comments about the meeting set up and location, 
and give them to him at the end of the meeting for 
review. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town 
Officers and Committees. 

John Emerson of the Sewer Commission gave a pro- 
gress report on the ongoing sewer project. So far 49% 
of the Town has been done. There is approximately 31% 
left to do. Once completed there will be a total number 
of 6,802 businesses and homes done. 

The Moderator made a point of order. Due to the next 
article being his, he stepped down as the Moderator and 
appointed James Harrington, Town Counsel as the Ac- 
ting Moderator. The Town Clerk Mary St.Hilaire, swore 
in James Harrington as the Acting Moderator, and the 
meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
I moved to waive the reading of this article. The Acting 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, it was so voted 
unanimously. 

Dennis McHugh proceeded to explain the intent of 
the article. A Rules Committee had been formed due 
to the passage of an article at the Town Meeting of Oc- 
tober 1, 1990. The Committee reviewed the procedures 
and format used during Town Meeting, and reported 
back to the Moderator via the Town Meeting in April 
1991. The Moderator explained that he would take their 



recommendations under advisement and present back 
to the Town Meeting Representatives an article which 
could be discussed and voted on. This article before the 
body tonight is the result of his findings. He went 
through the article explaining each section. A discus- 
sion took place. The Board of Selectmen and the 
Finance Commmittee were in favor of this article. A 
number of questions were asked concerning section 4.17 
Roll Call Ballot. Cheryl Warshafsky moved to amend 
the article to read 20 Town Meeting Representatives in- 
stead of 40 Town Meeting Representatives. She explain- 
ed that she felt the Representatives should be held ac- 
countable for their votes, and it should be a lesser 
number needed in order to accomplish a roll call. Ber- 
nard Ready, who was a member of the Committee ex- 
plained that this section had caused a great amount of 
discussion among the Committee Members. Some 
didn't want to have a roll call at all, while others didn't 
want to make it too easy or else it would delay the Town 
Meeting process. A compromise was made and the 
number 40 was agreed upon. The Board of Selectmen 
and the Finance Committee were not in favor of the 
motion. The Acting Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend, motion defeated. 

More discussion took place. Jonathan A. Stevens 
moved to delete section 4. 17 in its entirety. He felt that 
there was no need for a roll call vote. The Finance Com- 
mittee and the Board of Selectmen were not in favor 
of the motion to delete. David McLachlan, past Chair- 
man of the Rules Committee again explained the 
amount of discussion and debate that took place be- 
tween the committee members over the accountability 
issue, and asked for defeat of this motion and to sup- 
port the article as presented. Dean Carmeris question- 
ed how would the roll call vote be handled. Dennis 
McHugh explained that the Representative's names 
would be read, their vote recorded and then repeated 
by the Town Clerk. This process would become part of 
the minutes of that particular meeting. Cheryl Warshaf- 
sky spoke against the motion to delete this section, she 
felt that accountability is needed. The Acting Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion to delete sec- 
tion 4.17. Motion defeated. He then asked for a vote 
on the article by a show of hands, motion carried. The 
article reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the town vote 
to amend the General By-Law, Article II— Town 
Meeting, in the following manner: Section 4 shall be 
amended by adding the following sections: 

4.10 NOTICE— Dates and times proposed for conti- 
nuance of the town meeting shall be announced when 
the warrant is posted. 

4.11 END OF SESSION— No warrant article may be 
introduced for consideration after 11:00 p.m. without 
a majority vote of town meeting representatives present 
and voting to allow such consideration. 



55 



4.12 LOBBYING-Distribution of material and lob- 
bying on warrant articles or issues not related to war- 
rant articles being considered at that town meeting will 
be prohibited within an area of 100 feet outside the en- 
trance to the building housing the meeting. An area will 
be established inside the building but outside the 
meeting place where one individual from each group 
supporting or opposing an issue may distribute material 
or discuss the issue. Handout material should be dated 
and signed by the organization or individuals prepar- 
ing the material. 

4. 13 VOTING— Voice votes will not be used. All votes 
will be taken by a raising of hands. The Moderator will 
visually judge the vote and, if in doubt, will ask for a 
specific count. 

4.14 PRESENTATION 

a) When town property or assets are to be pur- 
chased or sold, the name of the purchase or 
seller, if known, must be disclosed by the 
sponsor. 

b) The sponsor of any warrant article shall speak 
initially to explain the article. 

c) Zoning By-law presentations by the sponsor 
must show a map denoting the existing zoning 
and the proposed changed zoning, including 
definitions of zones and explanations of 
changes. 

d) All sponsors of by-law changes must show the 
language of the existing by-law and the 
language of the change and an explanations of 
the change in the presentation. 

e) All recurring operating budget articles regular- 
ly presented at the Spring Annual Town 
Meeting to defray Town Expenses for the up- 
coming fiscal year must be presented showing 
the following: Dollars budgeted and expended 
for the last two years and for the current year; 
proposed budget dollars; and the revenue 
generated by the department requesting the 
budget. 

f) Visual aids used in any presentation must be 
large enough to be viewed from the back of 
the hall or handouts shall be distributed. 

g) The Moderator will allow a question-and- 
answer period of the sponsor of an article to 
gather factual information or understanding of 
the article. Debate of the article is not allowed 
during this time. 

4.15 RECOMMEND ATIONS-The Selectmen or 
Finance Committee shall have an opportunity to state 
their position on each article and are encouraged to state 



their reasons for their position. The Finance Commit- 
tee is not required to speak on a non-financial article. 

4.16 RULES OF DECORUM-The Moderator may £* 
distribute additional rules of debate or decorum not 
controverting any by-law or statute to help guide debate 
of issues before the Town Meeting. 



4.17 ROLL CALL BALLOT- A main motion on any 
article shall be voted upon by roll call ballot if forty (40) 
town meeting representatives so vote at the end of 
debate of that main motion and before a motion under 
the next article. 

Dennis McHugh resumed his position of Moderator. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 A discussion took place con- 
cerning the choice of Monday and Thursday nights. The 
Finance Committee felt that the Town Meeting Body 
shouldn't be locked into a particular schedule as a by- 
law. If there was a need to continue Town Meeting to 
Tuesday for whatever the reasoning, that would be im- 
possible according to the wording, therefore they are 
against the article. Selectman Roger Blomgren spoke in 
favor of the article, he felt it would eliminate debate 
and be easier for people to attend when set nights are 
established. John Conrad spoke against the article. Paul 
Gleason was in favor of having an advance schedule as 
mentioned in the previous article, however, he felt that 
the wording should be changed to reflect an allowance 
of a vote needed to change the night if necessary. He 
moved to amend the article by deleting the wording 
after the first Thursday and adding, "unless an alter- 
nate date is approved by a majority vote of Town 
Meeting Representatives. ' ' The Finance Committee was 
in favor of the motion to amend. Selectman Dennis 
Ready was in favor but felt that a Ws vote should be 
required rather than a majority. A discussion took place. 
Dennis Ready moved to amend the motion to read %'s 
vote required instead of the word majority. The Finance 
Committee supported the motion to amend. The 
Moderator attempted a vote by a show of hands, which 
left the chair in doubt. The following tellers were call- 
ed to come forward and conduct a hand count. Peter 
Lawlor, Patricia Plank, Dorothy Frawley, Jean Horgan, 
Lucy Simonian. The result was Yes 73 No 60. Motion 
carried to amend. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion as amended. Motion carried. He 
then asked for a show of hands on the main motion as 
amended, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote 
to amend the General By-Laws Article II Town Meeting 
Section 3 Time of Meeting by adding the following: 

Adjourned sessions of any Town Meeting shall be 
scheduled for only a Monday or Thursday unless an 
alternate date is approved by %'s vote of the Town 
Meeting Representatives present and voting. 



%y 



56 



UNDER ARTICLE 4 Wendy Marcks of the School 
Committee, moved to dismiss this article. She came for- 
ward and explained that a Town Meeting vote is no 
l> longer required. The law now requires that the Board 
of Selectmen must vote by October 15 if the Town will 
accept the teachers deferral plan. The Board of Select- 
men accepted the School Committee's recommendation 
and did not vote on the plan. The Finance Committee 
and the Board of Selectmen support the motion to 
dismiss. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked Town Counsel James Harring- 
ton to come forward and preside over the meeting, dur- 
ing the next article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Dwight Hayward of the 
Finance Committee explained the purpose of the arti- 
cle. Stipends are paid to certain elected and appointed 
officials. The Committee is not concerned about the 
issue of paying stipends, but about the added benefits 
that a person is eligible for once he/she receives the sti- 
pend. With the rising cost of health insurance cover- 
ages for town employee's being so high, the commit- 
tee questioned why should someone who works far less 
hours than the full or part-time weekly employees be 
allowed health benefits. Also if an individual retires after 
ten years of service the Town still must pay a reduced 
percentage of their health care costs. The Finance Com- 
mittee asked for the Representatives support on the ar- 
ticle. The majority of the Board of Selectmen were not 
in favor of the article. A lengthy discussion took place. 
Dennis Ready spoke in favor of paying stipends. He felt 
that they are justified and certain board's should receive 
stipends who presently don't. He explained that there 
are a lot of functions, etc. , that members of the different 
boards must attend, because of the office they hold. The 
stipend received offsets these costs, that otherwise 
would have to be absorbed. Wendy Marcks spoke about 
allowing the individuals who receive or want to receive 
health benefits be part of the Town's Group, but must 
pay 100% of the costs. The individual would still be pay- 
ing far less as a group member, rather than have to pay 
on an individual plan. The Town would save money and 
the individual would also save money. Barbara Ward 
acknowledged that it is expensive to be a volunteer, and 
many board members like herself and the rest of the 
School Committee do not receive any stipends. 
However, she feels that the town should grandfather 
those who presently receive a stipend , but not pay any 
future position or office holder. It should be an all or 
nothing allowance. Questions were asked on the total 
number of individuals involved. The Finance Commit- 
tee said that there were sixteen individuals and three 
of them participate in the Town's health plan. It was 
asked if these individuals could be paid some other way 
but not be eligible for the health benefits. Town Man- 
ager Bernard Lynch explained that these people could 
be paid as an "expense" therefore not be qualified as 
employee, but it's not recommended to do so. Philip 
Currier questioned the wording of the article. He felt 



that the third paragraph should use the word "shall" 
remain eligible.... instead of the present wording of 
"may." He moved to amend the article to reflect the 
word shall. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the motion to amend. The 
Acting Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried. More discussion took place. Robert Joyce 
moved to delete the second paragraph in its entirety and 
substitute "said by-law to take effect one year from the 
date of enactment. ' ' John Coppinger spoke against cut- 
ting anyone who presently is receiving insurance, but 
felt that more control should be done in the future. The 
Finance Committee was not in favor of the motion. The 
Board of Selectmen were not in favor of the motion. 
The Acting Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to amend. Motion defeated. Brad Emerson 
moved ' To form a committee made up of one member 
from each precinct to investigate the stipend structure 
and the benefit laws to make a report and proposal to 
this body in concert with the Finance Committee at the 
next annual town meeting." He then explained his 
reasoning for the motion. He felt that the issue raised 
certainly merited more study before any decisions could 
be made. More discussion took place. Mark Gauthier 
read a list of the positions that receive the stipends and 
gave examples of the duties that these positions do. He 
explained that most likely if the person charged for their 
actual service to the town as an expense, it would far 
exceed the stipend amount. James Doukszewicz, 
Finance Director assessed the different issues brought 
forth. He explained that presently there are four 
members of the health plan who receive stipends. The 
yearly cost is approximately $13, 000-$ 14, 000 per year. 
Currently there are no retired members who had receiv- 
ed stipends in the past on the plan. If in fact this article 
passes the individuals involved may according to federal 
law remain on the plan for two years. An individual 
could be paid as an expense. However, the state law 
will not allow individuals to be under the Town's plan 
unless they are receiving a salary or stipend. James 
Moriarty moved the question to stop any further 
debate. The Acting Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried unanimously. The Acting 
Moderator then asked for a show of hands on the mo- 
tion to form a committee. Motion carried. A number 
of Representatives questioned the show of hands. The 
tellers came forward and conducted an actual hand 
count. Yes 83 No 42, motion carried. 

Dennis McHugh resumed his position as Moderator, 
and the meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to reduce the Finance 
Committee Reserve Fund established under Article 10 
of the Annual Town Meeting of April 30, 1991 by 
$50,000. 

Bernard Lynch explained that the state aid portion 
to Chelmsford was reduced by $850,000. The Town 
must make up the difference. Therefore, by reducing 



57 



the reserve fund by this shown, and reducing specified 
departmental fixed costs as stated in under article 8, 
there would be no impact on the present services. The 
Town would have a balanced budget, and there would 
still be a reserve fund of $150,000. The Finance Com- 
mittee was in favor of the article. The reserve fund was 
originally budgeted for $150,000 at the Annual Town 
Meeting in April. An additional $50,000 had been put 
aside in anticipation of insurance costs which ended up 
being lower. Brad Emerson moved the question to stop 
further debate. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, uanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved to waive the reading of the motion under arti- 
cle 7. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. John Morrison one of the petitioners, ex- 
plained the article. People could make arrangements for 
trash pick up either through the town, which offered 
a tag and bag system, or through private haulers. All 
trash haulers are licensed by the Board of Health to be 
allowed to come into the town and pick up trash. The 
Board of Health made up rules and regulations that set 
forth certain requirements for these haulers to adhere 
to. Yankee Disposal could not meet the requirements 
set and went out of business. There were a number of 
residents who had paid a fee and had a contract with 
this company to pick up their trash. They tried 
numerous times to get in touch with or locate the 
owners of Yankee Disposal but to no avail. The Con- 
sumer Division could not offer any assistance with the 
matter. The residents then had to make other ar- 
rangements for trash pick up. The residents mention- 
ed in the article felt that because they had paid $70.00 
to join the Town's trash program, the Town should 
reimburse them half the cost because the Board of 
Health licensed Yankee Disposal to begin with. 

A discussion followed. The Finance Committee was 
not in favor of the article. The Selectmen wanted to hear 
from the Board of Health and Town Manager before 
making any recommendation. Bernard Lynch, Town 
Manager explained that when the Town sent out notices 
to the residents about trash pick, it was noted that 
private arrangements could be made with other haulers 
but that the town would not guarantee these services. 
The town would only be responsible for its own pro- 
gram offered. Mark Gauthier, member of the Board of 
Health stated that the Board of Health does indeed 
license trash haulers. However, the Board is not respon- 
sible for the haulers performance. The people listed 
entered into their own contract with Yankee Disposal. 
Donald Ayer moved to amend the article. To transfer 
the sum of $1,000 from the Finance Committee's 
reserve fund and the sum of $881.00 from Line Item 
26 of the 1992 Fiscal Budget to purchase trash stickers 
to provide each person listed with thirty stickers. He 
felt that this was the fairest way to handle the situa- 
tion. The Finance Committee was against the motion. 
They were not in favor of returing $35.00 to each per- 



son listed to begin with, as far as they were concerned 
this wasn't any different. They were still getting a re- 
fund. More discussion took place. Leonard Doolan 
moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a show of hands, motion carried unanimously. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the arti- 
cle, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
explained the article. As he mentioned in the discus- 
sion of article 6 due to the state aid cut back, the Town 
is forced to make up the difference. He then read the 
reduced budget figures and the departments that were 
affected. 

He read the Non-Appropriated Expenses figure and 
explained that these are recap sheet figures that do not 
appear in the actual budget: 



$210,160 



Non-Appropriated Expenses 




State Assessments 


-$197,250 


State/County Other Assessments 


-12,910 


Total 




Line Item 33. Undistributed Expenses 




Insurance 


-$188,359 


County Retirement 


-14,847 


Unemployment 


-75,000 


Medicare Tax 


-25,000 


Total 





$303,206 



Line Item 7. Nashoba Valley Technical School $14,160 (he 
noted, original figure was $38,301 which was prior to rejec- 
ting the teachers deferral plan vote of Oct. 15) 

Line Item 6. Chelmsford Public Schools 80,000 

Line Item 1. Municipal Administration Expenses 

Executive Office -750 

Finance Dept. -2,500 

Town Clerk -1,000 

Total $4,250 



Line Item 4. Muniucipal Administration Outlay 






Accounting 




500 


Line Item 8. Public Safety Salary 






Police 


-16,000 




Fire 


-13,000 




Total 




$29,000 


Line Item 9. Public Safety Expenses 






Inspections 




500 


Line Item 11. Public Safety Outlay 






Fire 




3,000 


Line Item 12. Public Works Salary 






DPW-Highway Division 




9,000 


Line Item 13. Public Works Expense 






DPW-Engineer Division 


-1,000 




DPW-Public Bldg. Div. 


-1,000 




DPW-Sewer Division 


-5,000 




Total 




$7,000 


Line Item 18. Sewer Comm. Expenses 




1,250 


Line Item 22. Cemetery Comm. Expenses 




1.250 



58 



Line Item 26. Community Services Exp. 


3,000 


Line Item 30. Library Expenses 


3,000 


Warrant Articles 




Art 10 Finance Committee Reserve Fund 


50,000 


TOTAL 


$743,167 



Bernard Lynch further explained that the original an- 
ticipated figure of state cut in aid was $1.5 million. 
These figures impact only the operating budgets of the 
town some $132,000. Other savings made from other 
non-departmental accounts. Resulted in no layoffs of 
personnel, no impact on services directly. This is a result 
of belt tightening and down sizing, it is a well balanc- 
ed budget. The reorganization of combining the 
Veterans Agent with the Director Elder Service as men- 
tioned at the April Town Meeting will not take place. 
After discussions with the Board of Selectmen and due 
to legal issues this full time position will be reinstated 
with a salary of approximately $20,000. The Community 
Service Salary Account will be increased $7,500 and with 
the $2,500 already available the position will be fund- 
ed beginning January 1, through June 30, 1992. Hiring 
procedures will take place within the next few weeks. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of the article and 
the figures presented by Bernard Lynch. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the Town Managers figures. 
A question was asked on where the $80,000 cut in the 
School Budget came from. Superintendent Dr. Richard 
Moser explained due to obtaining rent and some addi- 
tional grant money they are able to make cuts in areas 
that would not affect the overall performance of the 
School Department. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried. The article 
reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town 
vote to reduce the amount of money raised and ap- 
propriated to defray Town charges for the fiscal period 
from July 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992 under article 8 of 
the Annual Town Meeting of April 29, 1991 by the sum 
of $451 ,366.00 by amending the following line items in 
the budget: 



Line Item 33. Undistributed Expenses 
Line Item 7. Nashoba Valley Technical School 
Line Item 6. Chelmsford Public Schools 
Line Item 1. Municipal Administrative Exp. 
Line Item 4. Municipal Administrative Outlay 
Line Item 8. Public Safety Salary 
Line Item 9. Public Safety Expenses 
Line Item 11. Public Safety Outlay 
Line Item 12. Public Works Salary 
Line Item 13. Public Works Expense 
Line Item 18. Sewer Commission Expenses 
Line Item 22. Cemetery Commission Expenses 
Line Item 25. Commumity Services Salary 
Line Item 26. Community Services Expenses 
Line Item 30. Library Expenses 
TOTAL 



-303,206 

-14,160 

-80,000 

-4,250 

-500 

-29,000 

-500 

-3,000 

-9,000 

-7,000 

-1,250 

-1,000 

+7,500 

-3,000 

-3,000 

-451,366 



UNDER ARTICLE 9 Library Trustee Elizabeth 
McCarthy moved to dismiss this article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Chairman of the Housing 
Authority Ruth Delaney moved that the Town vote to 
grant the Chelmsford Housing Authority a sewer ease- 
ment 20 feet in width across the site of the Chelmsford 
Senior Center for a distance of 420 feet along Groton 
Road and 140 feet along Sheila Avenue, all as shown 
on a plan available at the offices of the Chelmsford 
Housing Authority and Town Clerk. 

Town Counsel James Harrington explained that this 
easement is necessary in order to allow the Housing 
Authority to tie into the sewer connection on Groton 
Road. This would allow the Housing Authority to pro- 
vide sewer service for housing that will be constructed 
on their site. The Board of Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee recommend the article. The Moderator ask- 
ed for vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Sue Olsen moved to adjourn the meeting until Mon- 
day evening October 28, 1991 at 7:30 p.m. at the Parker 
School Cafetorium. 

The Moderator announced prior to accepting the mo- 
tion to adjourn, that all Representatives arrive by 7:20 
p.m. and sit in their respected precincts and choose 
among themselves a member to sit on the proposed 
committee to review stipends and benefits. They will 
report their findings to him at 7:30 p.m. as the first 
order of business. He then asked for a show of hands 
on the motion to adjourn, motion carried. 

The Meeting adjourned at 11:00 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 28, 1991 

The Town Meeting Representatives meet in their 
respective precincts at 7:20 p.m. , to choose one member 
from each precinct to sit on the committee to review 
stipends and benefits. The names were submitted to the 
Moderator prior to calling the meeting to order. 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:35 p.m. at the Parker School Cafetorium, by 
the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. There were 135 Rep- 
resentative Town Meeting Members present. 



59 



The Moderator read the list of names submitted to 
him to be on the Stipend, Benefit Review Committee. 
They are as follows: 



Pet. 1 -Barry Balan 
Pet. 2-Sue Olsen 
Pet. 3-Kathleen Fitzpatrick 
Pet. 4-Beverly Koltookian 
Pet. 5-Dean Carmeris 



Pet. 6-Margaret Johnson 
Pet. 7-Mark Gauthier 
Pet. 8-Evelyn Bell 
Pet. 9-Charles Piper 



UNDER ARTICLE 11 Barbara Scavezze explained 
the purpose of the article. The Town's contract for trash 
pickup must be renewed on July 1, 1992. Beginning 
January 1 , 1993. The State will be banning the disposal 
of certain recyclables. This will be six months after the 
town renews it's contract. The purpose of this by-law 
is to be more of a policy by-law. Currently residents are 
already required to separate paper for recycling, in ad- 
dition bottles and cans would have to be separated. This 
would update the current by-law to coincide with the 
present recycling program and to prepare for the future 
enforcement of state regulations. This would require the 
Board of Selectmen to decide on the different options 
regarding the collection of recyclables. 

A lengthy discussion took place. Barry Balan asked 
what was the total number of households involved with 
the Town's program of recycling and trash pickup. Bar- 
bara Scavezze said that the estimated numbers were 
5,000 in the volunteer recycling and 7,168 receiving 
trash pickup. A number of Representatives spoke 
against the article. The different members of the Solid 
Waste Committee spoke in favor and asked for support. 
The Finance Committee supported the article. The 
Board of Selectmen do not support the article. Edward 
Hilliard spoke in favor of the article. Roger Blomgren 
spoke against the article and provided some facts and 
figures concerning the cost. He felt that recycling should 
not be mandatory until state policy becomes clearer on 
how towns will be affected by waste ban regulations. 
Recycling should be on a voluntary basis, as it is today, 
with those desiring to recycle to pay their fair share. 
More discussions took place. The Moderator asked for 
vote by a show of hands, which left the Chair in doubt. 
The following tellers were called forward to take a hand 
count. Dorothy Frawley, Jean Horgan, Patricia Plank, 
Lucy Simonian, Jaci Matzkin. The result of the hand 
count: Yes 49 No 68 the article was defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved to waive the reading of the article. Motion car- 
ried, by a show of hands. Joel Karp explained that the 
article basically makes a by-law out of the current trash 
and recycling system. He went through the article item 
by item. This will not be any different than the current 
system. The cost burden will be on only those who par- 
ticipate in the program. Either the user fee system can 
still be used, or at the will of a Town Meeting vote, fun- 
ding could be appropriated. If the user fee system is us- 
ed, then a program will be established called the Enter- 
prise Fund, which will be monitored by the Town Ac- 



countant. A lengthy discussion took place, whereas a 
number of Representatives asked questions. The 
Finance Committee had no recommendation one way 
or the other on the article. The Board of Selectmen 
stated they initially wanted to table the article, due to 
this topic being on their upcoming meeting agenda, in- 
stead Selectman Ready moved to amend the first 
sentence in section 8.9 to read as follows: 

The Town Manager shall, based upon information 
provided him by the Town Finance Director, Town Ac- 
countant, and other sources recommended to the Board 
of Selectmen the amount of the annual or other periodic 
user fee and/or charges. The Board of Selectmen shall 
establish this fee and/or charge prior to the Annual 
Spring Town Meeting. 

Selectman Ready explained that the Board of Select- 
men and the Town Manager agreed that the Selectmen 
should set the user's fee in an open forum, it should 
not be a policy decision made by the Town Manager. 
The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation on the motion to amend. The Finance 
Committee had no recommendation. The Board of 
Selectmen supported the motion. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried 
to amend. 

Mark Gauthier, Member of the Board of Health, mov- 
ed to amend the second sentence of Section 8.8 and the 
second and third sentences of Section 8.10. He felt that 
the Board of Health should not be involved with these 
particular sections. Joel Karp spoke against the motion 
to amend. The Moderator asked for the Finance Com- 
mittee's recommendation on the motion to amend. The 
Finance Committee had no recommendation. The 
Board of Selectmen supported the motion. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion 
to amend. Motion defeated. 

Judy Haas asked for the Solid Waste Committee's 
recommendation on the article. Barbara Scavezze said 
that the Committee's only concern was with section 8.6, 
which would not allow subsidizing other programs. This 
could jeopardize future additional leaf pickups or other 
programs such as this. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands on the article as amended. Motion carried. The 
article reads as follows: 

Joel Karp moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General By-law Article VIII Waste Disposal by adding 
Section 8 as follows: 

Section 8: Solid Waste, Recycling and Hazardous Waste 
Disposal Programs: 

8.1. The Town of Chelmsford shall continue its pro- 
gram of curb side pickup and disposal of solid 
household waste through the use of a private contrac- 
tor or contractors. 



60 



8.2. The Town of Chelmsford shall continue a pro- 
gram that encourages all residents to recycle specified 
items. 

8.3. The Town of Chelmsford shall continue its pro- 
gram for the disposal of household hazardous waste and 
related items. 

8.4. Funding for the above programs shall be through 
the appropriation of funds by an Annual or Special 
Town Meeting and/or the establishment of an annual 
or other periodic user or subscriber fee or charge. 

8.5. In the event that a user or subscriber fee or charge 
is established, said funds will be accounted for and 
maintained in a program specific ' Enterprise Fund or 
Account. ' ' Such fund shall be administered by the Town 
Accountant in accordance with applicable state laws, 
rules and regulations, concering this type of account. 

8.6. No program shall signihcantiy subsidize another 
program, except as follows: 

a. Billing 

In the event that an annual user or subscriber fee 
is established for household solid waste, the in- 
cidental cost of billing and payment processing for 
other programs shall be borne by the household 
solid waste program, provided that such billing 
and payment processing is included as part of the 
household solid waste programs billing and pay- 
ment schedule. 

b. Administration of Program 

In the event that an annual user or subscriber fee 
is established for household solid waste, the cost 
of administering the various non-household solid 
waste programs shall be borne by the solid waste 
programs exceeds 20°: of the total cost of ad- 
ministration, the Town shall either fund such ex- 
cess amount through and increase in non-solid 
waste fees or other appropriation. 

c. Equipment 

Equipment used to administer, support, and 
manage the solid waste program may be utilized 
by other departments of the Town. Said use shall 
be under the direction of the Town Manager. 

8.7. The Board of Health shall regulate and license 
trash haulers in accordance with the state laws. Said 
regulations shall provide for an annual or multi-year 
licensing period that runs concurrently with the annual 
user fee. if such a fee or charge is made. 

8.8. The Town Manager shall be responsible for the 
establishment and overall management of the various 
programs provided for in this by-law. The Board of 
Health shall be responsible for providing overall direc- 
tion and enforcement of those areas of any of the pro- 
grams that are assigned to it by state law. local by-law. 
the Board of Selectmen, or the Town Manager. 



8.9. The Town Manager shall, based upon informa- 
tion provided him by the Town Finance Director. Town 
Accountant, and other sources recommended to the 
Board of Selectmen the amount of the annual or other 
periodic user fee and/or charges. The Board of Select- 
men shall establish this fee and/or charge prior to the 
Annual Spring Town Meeting. The Town Manager 
shall, when presenting his budget to the Annual Spring 
Town Meeting, or any other town Meeting include in 
his budget a provision allowing for the appropriation 
of funds from general town funds for any of the pro- 
grams included in this by-law. the Town Manager shall 
implement such changes and adjust fees and/or other 
charges accordingly. 

8. 10. All user and other fees assessed and/or charged 
under the terms of this by-law shall be against the 
assigned owner of the property. In the event that a pro- 
perty owner shall fail to pay a fee or charge made under 
this by-law the Town Manager shall be authorized to 
suspend the service that has not been paid for. The 
Town Manager shall give the property owner 10 days 
notice by first class mail of the action to be taken. The 
Town Manager shall notify the Board of Health of the 
proposed action. 

8. 1 1 . A property owner may elect to use an alternate 
trash hauler to comply with the terms of this by-law and 
requirements of the Board of Health for the disposal 
of household trash provided that the alternate trash 
hauler has been licensed by the Board of Health and 
appropriate documentation is provided to the Town 
Manager within 30 days of the start of the annual or 
other service period established by the Town Manager. 
In the event that a property owner fails to provide the 
appropriate documentation, it shall be presumed that 
the property owner is participating in the Town pro- 
grams. The Town Manager shall have the authority to 
establish appropriate rules and regulations for the im- 
plementation of this provision and the apportionment 
of fees and/or charges based upon partial year use. The 
Town Manager shall be authorized to establish rules and 
regulations that allow for abatements anbd payment 
deferral based on hardship or other similar circum- 
stances. 

8. 12. In the event that a property owner wishes to ap- 
peal a decision of the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, upon written request by the property owner, 
shall hear such appeal and modify the Town Manager's 
decision provided that such decision shall be based 
upon the terms of this by-law. applicable laws, rules and 
regulations as they pertain to the programs included in 
the by-law. An affirmative vote of 3 members of the 
Board of Selectmen shall be required to alter a decision 
of the Town Manager. 

8.13. In the event that the programs shall be totally 
funded by general funds available to the Town and that 
no user fee or other charge shall be required in a given 
fiscal year, the non-financial assets of the program shall 



61 



be given to the Town at no cost or charge. Any surplus 
of funds in the "Enterprise Account" shall be return- 
ed to the users as a credit against their real estate taxes 
and/or other fees and betterments by the Town 
Treasurer. 

8.14. Interpretation and implementation of the terms 
of this by-law shall be made by the Town Manager. This 
by-law shall go into effect at the earliest date permissi- 
ble by applicable state law. All funds collected for the 
current years programs shall be handled in accordance 
with the provisions of this by-law. 

8. 15. The Town Manager shall within 120 days of the 
adoption of this by-law prepare and make available the 
rules and regulations implementing the various pro- 
grams included in this by-law. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 The Moderator explained 
that he represented the proponents of the next article. 
he would step down as Moderator. He asked Town 
Counsel James Harrington to come forward and be the 
Acting Town Moderator for this article. James Harring- 
ton came forward and the Town Clerk. Mary St. Hilaire 
swore in James Harrington as the Acting Moderator. 
Bruce Harper. Superintendent of the North Water 
District explained the purpose of the article. It was to 
change a 1.72 acre parcel of land from open space to 
public use. Open Space under Public Utilities is a pro- 
hibited use according to the zoning by-law which was 
passed in 1988. The Water District looked at six sites. 
including the present site on Washington St. Currently 
the District is in the process of removing a smaller tank 
built in 1907, which had a capacity- of 357.000 gallons. 
An estimate for repairs was made and because of the 
amount of work needed to be done, the minimum cost 
would be SI 14.000. This estimate was done prior to the 
damage of Hurricane Bob on August 20. 1991 . in which 
the steel cover was blown off the tank. Presently located 
on the same site is a tank of 1.8 million gallons capa- 
city, which was built in 1969. The Commissioners feel 
that there is a definite need to decentralize the loca- 
tion of any future tanks. That is why six site locations 
were reviewed. The furthest distance from the 
Washington St. tank is where the new tank should be 
put. because the water pressure becomes lower. The 
Groton Road. Ward Way is the outlying area and can 
be serviced from the Swain Road site. The present tank 
could handle the commercial usage required for the 
Drum Hill area. However, an additional tank is need- 
ed in order to assure the complete safety of all water 
residential and commercial users. The Water Commis- 
sioners asked permission to allow the Engineer of the 
Tower. Thomas Mahanna. to speak from time to time. 
He is a resident but not a registered voter of the Town. 
The Acting Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion, motion carried. 

David McLachlan. past chairman of the Rules Com- 
mittee expressed concern that the committee had re- 
quested any changes in zoning must be shown on a map 



or over head, or handouts. Bruce Harper brought forth 
a zoning map. which did show the locations of the sites 
in review. The Acting Moderator made a point of order 
that the Rules Committee request was a by-law that had 
just been passed and has to be sent to the Attorney 
General for approval. Technically this rule is not yet in 
effect. 

A lengthy discussion took place. A number of 
residents from Kelshill Road and Rhum Circle, which 
directly abut the Swain Road site, asked questions con- 
cerning the site. Concerns were expressed about being 
next to the current closed dump site. There is a cap on 
the dump site, but could problems arise in the future? 
Thomas Mahanna answered because of the slope and 
terrain the proposed site would not be effected. It was 
mentioned at the public hearing about the future 
development of the area. The town of Westford has 
plans for a future development which will be on the 
Westford/Chelmsford town line. Is this the real reason 
for the proposed site, to aide the developer? Bruce 
Harper explained that the development does include 
26 acres which would qualify and have to be serviced 
by the district, at some point. Kim MacKenzie read the 
Planning Board's recommendation on the article. The 
Planning Board held a Public Hearing on September 11. 
1991 . At the meeting on September 25. 1991 . the Board 
voted unanimously '6-0' to recommend the designation 
"Open Space (OS) District." as shown on said zone 
map. and substituting in place thereof new lines and 
designation "Public P District," insofar as said zone 
map relates to the described premises. The Acting 
Moderator asked for the Selectmen's recommendation. 
The Selectmen had no position to state. The Finance 
Committee did not recommend the article. More discus- 
sion took place. Brad Emerson moved the question to 
stop debate, which requires a unanimous vote, or a 
hand count must be taken. The Acting Moderator ask- 
ed for a show of hands twice. In which case noted 2 
hands showed in opposition, and 32 were in favor, 
therefore he declared debate to stop. He called the 
tellers forward to conduct a hand count for the vote on 
the article. Yes 26 No 83. motion defeated. 

Dennis McHugh resumed his position as Moderator 
and the meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Jeffrey Stallard explained the 
purpose of the article. He circulated a petition and 
received and qualified enough signatures to allow this 
article to appear. He felt that himself and those who 
had signed the petition agreed, that the present way 
that the budget is handled should be converted back 
to the way it was done prior to the adoption of the 
Charter. In the past the Moderator would read thru 
each department and discussion was allowed and 
sometimes amendments were made, and a vote was 
taken at the end of budget on the total monies to raise 
and appropriate. The budget figures shown were what 
the departments worked with through the fiscal year. 
The Finance Committee, would allow transfers when 



62 



necessary, but for the most part, the department head 
stayed within the figures as voted. Now. the Charter 
allows the Town Manager to present the budget. 
Technically only five Sub-department line items make 
up the entire budget. All the individual departments are 
categorized under Sub-departments and the total sub- 
departmental budget is what is used throughout the 
year. The Manager is allowed to make transfers within 
any categorized department that falls in the sub- 
department line item. This method doesn't really show 
at the year's end what the total cost is to run a depart- 
ment. The Finance Committee is not in favor of the ar- 
ticle. They feel that the operation of the budget is bet- 
ter when the figures are set up under the sub- 
department system. The Board of Selectmen oppose the 
article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 The Moderator read the en- 
tire article. James A. Sousa moved to amend the article 
by adding a sentence after the first paragraph. "To be 
filed as a Home Rule Petition, to apply only to certain 
employees of the Town of Chelmsford.'' John Robin- 
son explained the purpose of the article. The present 
civil service law allows for a five year re-hired call back 
list. This home rule petition would apply to only cer- 
tain Chelmsford employees who were laid off due to 
budget cut backs. They would have a total of ten years' 
time to be called back to work for the Town. John 
Robinson explained that the age limit for taking the test 
for the Fire Department is 32. He is over that age. so 
after five years as the law now reads, he would not be 
eligible to come back, nor could be take another test. 
He wants to be a fireman and work in the Town of 
Chelmsford, he has already worked in the system for 
four years. He felt that if these additional five years are 
added that he would be re-hired in the future. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee was not in 
favor of the motion to amend, or the original motion. 
The Board of Selectmen were in favor of amendment 
and the article. They felt that there wouldn't be any 
cost to the Town, they would be hiring a trained em- 
ployee. Bernard Lynch. Town Manager was against the 
article. He felt that in the private sector there is no recall 
time. This should be treated the same way. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. The Article reads as follows: 

James Sousa moved that the town vote to petition the 
Great and General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to amend the following Massachusetts 
General Laws, pertaining to Civil Service Law Chapter 
31. Section 39. To be filed as a Home Rule Petition, to 
applv onlv to certain employees of the Town of Chelms- 
ford. 

If permanent employees in positions having the same 
title in a department unit are to be separated from such 
positions because of lack of work or money or aboli- 



tion of positions, they shall, except as hereinafter pro- 
vided, be separated from employment according to their 
seniority, so that employees senior in length of service, 
computed in accordance with section thirty- three, shall 
be retained the longest and reinstated first. Employees 
separated from positions under this section shall be 
reinstated prior to the appointment of any other ap- 
plicants to fill such positions or similar positions, pro- 
vided that the right to such reinstatement shall lapse 
at the end of the five-year period following the date of 
such separation. 

Amended the law would read: 

If permanent employees in positions having the same 
title in a department unit are to be separated from such 
positions because of lack of work or money or aboli- 
tion of positions, they shall, except as hereinafter pro- 
vided, be separated from employment according to their 
seniority in such unit and shall be reinstated in the unit 
and the same positions or positions similar to those 
formerly held by them according to such seniority, so 
that employees senior in length of service, computed 
in accordance with sections thirty-three, shall be retain- 
ed the longest and reinstated first. Employees separated 
from positions under this section shall be reinstated 
prior to the appointment of any other applicants to fill 
such positions or similar positions, provided that the 
right to such reinstatement shall lapse at the end of the 
ten-year period following the date of such separation. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 James Geary representing 
Altid Enterprise asked permission from the Body to 
allow Barbara Carye, and Drew Leff who are non- 
residents to make a presentation to the body. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
Barbara Carye spoke about the article, and how the pro- 
posed improvements would improve the property and 
be an asset to the Town. Drew Leff the architect gave 
a brief presentation showing the proposed changes to 
the buildings and the parking area, and stated the 
changes that were taking place concerning security etc. 
The Finance Committee had no recommendation. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor. Kim MacKenzie. 
chairman of the Planning Board read the Board's 
recommendation. The Planning Board held a public 
hearing on September 11. 1991. At the meeting of 
September 25. 1991. they voted to recommend (4-1) a 
zoning change of the described property, consisting of 
28.5 acres of land with buildings thereon, from Neigh- 
borhood Commercial District <CA) and Limited In- 
dustrial District (LA) to a Shopping Center District (CO. 
A lengthy discussion took place. John Conrad spoke 
against the article. He said that the neighborhood con- 
cerns over the years had not been addressed and ex- 
pressed disappointment with the Planning Board's 
recommendation. Only since the last public hearing had 
some of the concerns been met. Ruth Delaney spoke 
against the article. Ralph Nebalski expressed traffic con- 
cerns for the residents in the Dalton Road area. A 
number of Representatives spoke in favor. Philip Cur- 



63 



rier felt that the proposed improvements would greatly 
benefit the area. Edward Cady felt that where it has 
been there for twenty years, the zoning change should 
be allowed. Fran McDougall questioned if they had tied 
into sewage yet. and if not were they being fined? If 
not then why not? John Emerson of the Sewer Com- 
mission stated that they had until May of 1992 to be 
tied into the system, therefore no fines were required 
or being collected. The Moderator stated that a 2 /3's vote 
is required. He asked the tellers to come forward and 
conduct a hand count. Yes 80 No 42, %'s is 81, the mo- 
tion is defeated. 

Joseph Erbacher moved to have article 15 brought 
back for reconsideration. He felt that the show of hands 
was a close vote. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to reconsider article 15, motion 
defeated. 

John Conrad moved to adjourn the Town Meeeting 
until Thursday, October 31, 1991. The Finance Com- 
mittee and the Board of Selectmen were against the mo- 
tion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion defeated. 

Scott McCaig moved to reconsider article 16. He had 
no opinion one way or another on the issue. He just 
felt that the count was extremely close and merited 
another count. The Finance Committee was against the 
motion. The Board of Selectmen were in favor. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried 
to reconsider the article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Bradford Emerson moved the 
question to stop debate on the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for the tellers 
to come forward and conduct a hand count. Yes 81 No 
43 %'s is 82, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Christine Gleason moved to 
dismiss the article. The Finance Committee was in favor 
of the dismissal. The Board of Selectmen were in favor 
of the motion. The Moderator read the Planning 
Board's recommendation. The Planning Board held a 
Public hearing on September 11, 1991. At the meeting 
of September 25, 1991 the board voted unanimously 
against (6-0) to amend the zoning by-laws article VI 
Special Regulations, Section 4100 Accessory Uses and 
Structure, by adding a new subsection 4194. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried. 



tide entirely. The Town Manager was against the arti- 
cle and the amendment. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to amend. Motion car- 
ried. He then asked for a show of hands on the article 
as amended, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman Dennis Ready 
moved that the town vote to amend the General By- 
laws Article VII Miscellaneous Section 5. License Fees 
by deleting the fourth paragraph which reads as follows: 

All fees shall be increased by Five Dollars ($5.00) on 
the first day of the second month following the required 
licensing period, as outlined in Section 3 (a) of this By- 
Law, and by an additional Five Dollars ($5.00) on the 
first day of each succeeding month. 

and substitute in its place the following: 

All fees shall be increased by Five dollars ($5.00) on 
the first day of the second month following the required 
licensing period, as outlined in Section 3 (a) of this By- 
law, and by an additional Five Dollars ($5.00) on the 
first day of each succeeding month up to June 30th each 
year. 

Selectman Ready explained that this would be a cap 
on the dog licensing process. Currently if a person 
doesn't get a license by the first of March they are charg- 
ed $5.00 for each month that they are late. At the end 
of the calendar year the fee could be as much as $60.00. 
This by-law would allow the final cost to be $30.00 from 
July first through December 31st. The Board of Select- 
men and the Finance Committee were in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. Seeing that there was no further business 
at hand, the Moderator declared the meeting ad- 
journed. The Meeting adjourned at 11:25 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



UNDER ARTICLE 18 Jeffrey Stallard moved to 
amend this article to be $5,000.00 raise and ap- 
propriated, instead of $15,000, as first requested. He 
explained that the Town Manager does now include in 
the budget provisions to pay for a full time Veteran's 
agent. He felt that the salary should be more. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the reduction but 
against the article. The Selectmen were against the ar- 



64 



TOWN MEETING 
REPRESENTATIVES 





PRECINCT 1 


TERM 


NAME 


1994 


Joel M. Karp 


1994 


Richard P. McClure 


1994 


Martha McClure 


1994 


William E. Spence 


1994 


Robert M. Schneider 


1994 


Jean B. Rook 


1993 


David A. MacDonald 


1993 


Helen A. Manahan 


1993 


Susan G. Koeckhoven 


1993 


Sandra A. Kilburn 


1993 


Barry B. Balan 


1993 


Robert P. Joyce 


1992 


Phillip L. Currier 


1992 


John G. Coppinger 


1992 


Marian D. Currier 


1992 


Robert E. Olson 


1992 


Carl W. Seidel 


1992 


Scott J. McCaig 




PRECINCT 2 


TERM 


NAME 


1994 


Jeffrey W. Stallard 


1994 


Milton H. Kinney 


1994 


Karen S. Vandenbulcke 


1994 


Marc A. Vandenbulcke 


1994 


Mary J. Welch 


1994 


Albert Leman 


1993 


Robert J. Scharn 


1993 


George L. Merrill 


1993 


Francis G. Miskell 


1993 


Harry A. Foster 


1993 


Susan M. Olsen 


1993 


Harold I. Matzkin 


1992 


Bonnie I. Foster 


1992 


Loretta A. Gelenian 


1992 


Barry T. Bell 


1992 


George F. Abely 


1992 


Kathryn A. Schmitz 


1992 


David G. Conrad 




PRECINCT 3 


TERM 


NAME 


1994 


Pamela S. Am way 


1994 


Michael F. McCall 


1994 


Ann Y. Graham (Resigned 7-17-911 


1994 


Thomas J. Welch 


1994 


Robert D. Marazzi 


1994 


Thomas E. Moran 


1993 


Kathleen S. Fitzpatrick 


1993 


Jane S. McKersie 


1993 


Brenda A. McDermott 


1993 


Carol A. Marcotte 


1993 


D. Lorraine Lambert 


1993 


Priscilla A. Rega 


1992 


Michael F. Curran 


1992 


Christine A. Gleason 



1992 Thomas P. Regan (Resigned 5-1-911 

1992 John P. Emerson, Jr. (Removed 12-31-911 

1992 Judith Hass 

1992 John M. Hanlon 

1992 Katherine C. Harbison** (Replaced t. Regan) 

1992 James W. Moriarty* * (unexp 2 yr. term) 

Replaced A. Graham 

"Vacancy filled by Reps. Term expires at next Town Election 

PRECINCT 4 

TERM NAME 

1994 Donald P. Ayer 

1994 Steven B. Hadley 

1994 Beverly A. Koltookian 

1994 Michael R. Parquette 

1994 Kay E. Roberts 

1994 Daniel J. Sullivan 

1993 Bonita Towle Hann* 
1993 John T. Conrad 
1993 Ruth K. Delaney 
1993 Thomas E. Firth Jr. 
1993 Gerald W. Pacht 
1993 John B. Sousa Jr. * 

1992 Martha Shelton (Resigned 7- 11-91 > 

1992 Linda J. Allen 

1992 Jeffrey A. Brem 

1992 Robert L. Hughes 

1992 Lynn M. Marcella 

1992 Frances T. McDougall 

1992 Arthur J. Moores" 

"Vacancy filled by Reps. Term expires at next Town Election 
'Moved from precinct serves out term until next Town Election 





PRECINCT 5 


TERM 


NAME 


1994 


Steven J. Temple 


1994 


Jonathan A. Stevens 


1994 


Robert E. Brooks 


1994 


W. Allen Thomas Jr. 


1994 


Catherine Brown 


1994 


Patricia Wojtas 


1993 


Arnold J. Lovering 


1993 


Barbara H. Ward 


1993 


James M. Creegan 


1993 


Wendy C. Marcks 


1993 


Kathleen F. Hillman 


1993 


David P. McLaughlin 


1992 


Ronald W. Wetmore 


1992 


J. Ronald Gamache 


1992 


Evelyn S. Thoren 


1992 


Dean Carmeris 


1992 


Glenn R. Thoren 


1992 


Violet R. Stone 




PRECINCT 6 


TERM 


NAME 


1994 


Mary E. Frantz 


1994 


David W. Foner 


1994 


Patrick J. Calnan 


1994 


James A. Sousa 



65 



1994 Earl C. Burt 

1994 Howard J. Hall 

1993 John W. Carson 

1993 Raymond P. McKeon 

1993 Margaret A. Johnson 

1993 Bradford O. Emerson 

1993 Janet G. Dubner 

1993 M. Elizabeth Marshall 

1993 David J. McLachlan 
1992 Aileen R. McCarthy 
1992 Roger A. Blomgren 
1992 Edward S. Marshall 
1992 Martin A. Gruber 

1992 Cheryl M. Warshafsky 

PRECINCT 7 

TERM NAME 

1994 Paul F. Gleason 
1994 Thomas E. Mills 
1994 Linda G. Morabito 

1994 Margaret A. Schloeman (Resigned 7-28-91 > 

1994 Carol A. Stark 

1994 Frederick W. Wikander 

1993 Susan J. Gates 
1993 Joan M. Gauthier 
1993 Mark E. Gauthier 
1993 Edward H. Hilliard 
1993 Dennis J. Ready 

1993 Bernard A. Ready 

1992 Donald O. Benson (Resigned 8-18-9D 

1992 Katherine Brough 

1992 Leonard W. Doolan III 

1992 Dwight M. Hayward 

1992 Bruce A. Kunkel 

1992 Andrew V. Silinish 

1992 Greta E. Roberts* * (unexp. 2 yr. term) 

1992 Beyla V. Makovsky* ' 

* 'Vacancy filled by Reps. Term expires at next Town Election 

PRECINCT 8 

TERM NAME 

1994 Bruce J. Harper, Sr. 
1994 Alexander W. Gervais 
1994 Peter G. Johnson 
1994 Samuel Poulten 

1994 Evelyn P. Bell 

1994 Christopher T. Garrahan 

1993 Walter A. Cleven 
1993 Stuart G. Weisfeldt 
1993 Doris J. Mahoney 
1993 William P. Keohane 
1993 William F. Dalton 
1993 Richard J. Day 
1992 Cynthia A. Walcott 
1992 Carrie A. Steiman 
1992 Henry E. Sullivan 
1992 Richard P. Greska 
1992 Daniel W. Burke 
1992 Stanley W. Norkunas 





PRECINCT 9 


TERM 


NAME 


1994 


Allan T. Galpin Jr. 


1994 


Cynthia J. Kaplan 


1994 


Frank R. Peterson 


1994 


Edward A. Cady 


1994 


Joseph M. Erbacher 


1994 


Phyllis Elias 


1993 


Eleanor D. Abbott 


1993 


Alan R. Pajak 


1993 


John S. Fudge, Jr. 


1993 


Roland E. Linstad 


1993 


Elizabeth A. McCarthy 


1993 


Doris A. Tereshko 


1992 


Alan L. Moyer 


1992 


Barbara J. Scavezze 


1992 


Samuel J. Brink 


1992 


Donald L. Elias 


1992 


James P. Good 


1992 


Charles A. Piper 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS (3 Yr. Term) 

Diane M. Phillips (appt.) Term Expires 6/93 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 6/92 

Bruce Symmes (appt.) Term Expires 6/94 

CEMETERY COMMISSION (3 Yr. Term) 

Everett V. Olsen Term Expires 1994 

Gerald L. Hardy, Chairman Term Expires 1992 

Charlotte P. DeWoli, Vice Chairman . .Term Expires 1993 

CONSTABLE (3 Yr. Term) 

William E. Spence Term Expires 1992 

BOARD OF HEALTH (3 Yr. Term) 

Paul E. McCarthy, Clerk Term Expires 1994 

Paul J. Canniff , Chairman Term Expires 1992 

Mark W. Gauthier, Vice Chairman — Term Expires 1993 

Appt. Dr. Michael Dean Term Expires 1992 

Director: Richard J. Day 
Nurse: Judy Dunigan 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (5 Yr. Term) 

William P. Keohane Term Expires 1996 

Lynn M. Marcella Term Expires 1992 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1993 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman Term Expires 1995 

Pamela Turnbull (Gov. appt.) Term Expires 7/93 

Director: Lisa Royce 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES (3 Yr. Term) 

Janet B. Hendl Term Expires 1992 

Sarah L. Warner, Chairman Term Expires 1992 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy, Treasurer Term Expires 1993 

D. Lorraine Lambert, Vice Chairman . .Term Expires 1993 

Lynda Reid Warren Term Expires 1993 

Kay Roberts, Secretary Term Expires 1994 

Nancy Knight Term Expires 1994 

Director: Mary E. Mahoney 



66 



MODERATOR (3 Yr. Term) 

Dennis E. McHugh Term Expires 1993 

PLANNING BOARD (3 Yr. Term) 

Christine Gleason, Clerk Term Expires 1994 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Chairman Term Expires 1994 

James P. Good Term Expires 1994 

Ann McCarthy Term Expires 1992 

John F. McCarthy Term Expires 1992 

Eugene E. Gilet Term Expires 1993 

Thomas J. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman . . .Term Expires 1993 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (3 Yr. Term) 

Barbara H. Ward, Secretary Term Expires 1994 

Carol A. Olsson Term Expires 1992 

Wendy Marcks Term Expires 1992 

Judith B. Mallette, Chairman Term Expires 1993 

Mary E. Frantz, Vice Chairman Term Expires 1993 

Superintendent: Dr. Richard H. Moser 

SELECTMEN (3 Yr. Term) 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman Term Expires 1992 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr Term Expires 1992 

Roger A. Blomgren Term Expires 1993 

William R. Logan, Vice Chairman Term Expires 1994 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Clerk Term Expires 1994 

SEWER COMMISSION (3 Yr. Term) 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman Term Expires 1992 

Robert P. Joyce, Vice Chairman Term Expires 1993 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1993 

George Abely Term Expires 1994 

2 Yr. Term: Jeffrey A. Brem, Clerk . . . .Term Expires 1992 
Sewer Superintendent: James Casparro 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Charlotte P. DeWolf, Chairman 
Gerald L. Hardy, Commissioner 
Everett V. Olsen, Commissioner 

The Commission began the year by electing Dr. 
Everett Olsen to be Chairman of the Commission. 

At the beginning of Fiscal 1991, the Cemetery Com- 
mission found a crisis of major import, when enough 
usable grave space to satisfy the needs of the Town's 
population would not be met. 

A total of 4 graves were available at one cemetery, 
while at Pine Ridge Cemetery, the selection available 
was being taxed by the limitation of lots available at 
other Town Cemeteries. 

While this pressure had been somewhat relieved in 
the previous year by expanding lot layouts in Fairview 
and West Chelmsford Cemeteries, it was obvious that 
energetic steps were required. 



A master plan for the development and financing of 
Pine Ridge Cemetery was presented at a Selectmen's 
Meeting on April 2 by Mr. Frank Peterson, the 
Cemetery Superintendent. This plan delineated the 
steps necessary to keep this Cemetery available for 
future use. The plan superseded the one made almost 
100 years ago, in 1899, which had now run its course. 
The plan presented can be expected to provide for a 
similar length of time. 

Dr. Olsen followed by noting that the plan would im- 
pose no burden on the taxpayers of Chelmsford. It 
would be financed by available funds, and funds to 
become available to the Cemetery Commission. 

The master plan was enthusiastically endorsed by the 
Selectmen and work on its implementation began 
immediately. 

By the end of the year the outline for the next major 
extension of Pine Ridge Cemetery was visible. The clear- 
ing, earthworks, seeding and initial planting work are 
now in place and plans for available grave space for early 
1993 are achievable. 

As originally proposed, this major project has been 
accomplished at no cost to the Taxpayers of 
Chelmsford. 

The Cemetery Commission had studied the man- 
power requirements of the Cemetery Department as 
related to workloads and decided to request funding 
for one less employee for the year, recognizing the 
Town's financial difficulties. 

The Cemetery operating staff now consists of the 
Superintendent and two full time employees. The staff 
is to be congratulated on handling the operations of the 
six town cemeteries while the burial rate increased 22% 
to a total of 139 earth interments in the fiscal year. 

We are pleaed to note that the computerization of 
Cemetery records has been completed. 

Maps for all active sections of the town cemeteries 
have also been computerized. 

Our Cemetery Superintendent, Mr. Frank Peterson, 
has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Mass- 
achusetts Cemetery Association. 

The Commission notes an increase in Cemetery Van- 
dalism during this period. On the brighter side, we are 
pleased to note that citizens have come forward to 
donate cash in $10 and $20 increments to help defray 
the cost of the rehabilitation. At this time, all but $400 
has been paid by these donations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank R. Peterson 

Secretary to the Commissioners 



67 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members 

Chairman Paul Canniff 

Vice Chairman Mark Gauthier 

Clerk Paul McCarthy 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Richard J. Day 

Asst. Director/Health Inspector John P. Emerson, Jr. 
Departmental Assistant Diana L. Wright 

Town Nurse Judith Dunigan, R.N. 

Town Physician Eric P. Kaplan, M.D. 

Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1991 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. 
The Board of Health has continued to run its dye testing 
and water sampling programs. Numerous tests have 
been performed by the Board of Health along with the 
issuance of septic system permits for repairs and new 
construction. 

Administration and Managment 

Income for various services and permits is listed 
below: 

Percolation Tests-64 $ 3,200 

Deep Tests-96 4,800 

Sewage Repair Permits-80 2,000 

Sewage Construction Permits— 28 1,400 

Miscellaneous License & Fees 16,185 

$27,585 

During 1991 four inspections were made at existing 
day care centers; one-hundred sixty-eight inspections 
were made for Chapter II Housing; eight school inspec- 
tions; Four-hundred eighty complaints received and 
checked; Camp Paul inspections; thirty bathing beaches 
inspections; five International Certificates of Vaccina- 
tion, restaurant and retail food store inspections, one- 
hundred twenty-three establishments in town inspected 
twice a year. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was reap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's Hazar- 
dous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to 
enforce the "Right-to-Know" law for this town. 

During our Annual Household Hazardous Waste Col- 
lection Day, held on May 11, 1991, we properly dispos- 
ed of the following quantities of materials: 

1. 24 barrels of Hazardous Materials 

2 . 1 , 200 + Gallons of Automotive Waste Oil 

3. 225 Car Batteries 

4. 368 Car and Truck Tires 



New Regulations for the Protection of the Public 
Health 

1991 was another productive year for the Board of 
Health. During this time frame the Board of Health im- 
plemented, initiated or upgraded regulations to control 
the areas of 1 . Solid Waste— Dumpster Residential or 
Commercial Collection; 2. Created a comprehensive 
smoking regulation to deal with all aspects of smoke and 
tobacco products; and 3. A local waste oil regulation 
requiring its return to the stores where it was purchas- 
ed for proper disposal. 

Communicable Disease Program 

Reports of the following diseases were completed dur- 
ing 1991 for the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health: 

Lyme Disease 2 

Hepatitis B 2 

Salmonella 7 

Campylobacter Enteritis 15 

Giardiasis 13 

Viral Meningitis 2 

Tuberculosis Control Program* 29 

Kawasaki 1 

Haemophilus Influenza 1 

Toxoplasmosis 1 

'Referrals received from the Lowell Chest Clinic and 
Middlesex Community Hospital TB Clinic. 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and 
those persons whose employment require certification 
of freedom from that disease is another responsibility 
of the Town Nurse. One-hundred twenty Mantoux (TB) 
tests were given to town residents for pre-employment 
and to household contacts of active cases in compliance 
with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health 
regulations. Home visits and telephone calls are made 
to families of active and some inactive tuberculosis cases 
on a periodic basis to insure understanding of the il- 
lness and that adequate medical follow-up is achieved. 
Numerous medical records are kept and updated on 
residents who have a positive (TB) mantoux test and 
are receiving medication prophylactically and being 
followed radiologically at the Lowell Chest Program. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging sponsored 
two flu clinics this year. One-hundred fifty persons were 
immunized with pneumonia vaccine and one thousand 
six-hundred three persons were immunized with flu 
vaccine at clinics. Additional doses were given to nurs- 
ing homes, school nurses for staff, seven home visits 
were made to handicapped or house-bound residents 
and thirty-six doses to McFarlin Manor and Chelmsford 
Arms residents. A total of one thousand six-hundred 
three doses of flu vaccine were administered in town. 

One-hundred ninety-seven immunizations were ad- 
ministered to adults and students in compliance with 
the Massachusetts School Immunization Laws and pro- 



68 



phylatically to residents traveling to underdeveloped 
countries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the 
first Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the 
Board of Health, Town Offices. Three-hundred eighty- 
five residents attended the screenings. 

Cholesterol Screening Program 

Cholesterol screenings were offered to residents 
several times during the year. A nominal fee was charg- 
ed and the dates were announced in the newspapers 
several weeks prior to the screening. One-hundred 
residents were screened for cholesterol. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Health Department offers lead paint testing for 
children between the ages nine months and six years. 
Residents may call the Health Department at 250-5243 
and make an appointment with the nurse. Seventy-eight 
children were screened for lead paint. 

Other screenings offered by the Health Department 
include Diabetes and Mammography. Dates of these 
programs will be advertised in advance. 

A Health Fair will be held in conjunction with 
Westford every other year, finances permitting. 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

ANNUAL REPORT 

July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Com- 
missioners worked diligently over the past year to com- 
plete work on the new elderly and family developments. 
The commissioners held the Dedication of Delaney Ter- 
race, the new elderly development at 8 Sheila Avenue, 
North Chelmsford, on August 27, 1990. Delaney Ter- 
race has forty-eight units, three of which are for the han- 
dicapped and one, four bedroom unit is for the frail 
elderly who need extra care, but are able to live semi- 
independently. All State and Town Officials, residents 
of Chelmsford and Delaney Terrace were invited to at- 
tend the Dedication. The four family units on Mill Road 
and the four family units on the corner of James and 
John Street opened in 1989. The three family units on 
Sheila Avenue opened in the Spring of 1990. One of the 
family units on Sheila Avenue in North Chelmsford is 
set up for a physically handicapped family member. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority in April 1991 sign- 
ed an amended contract with MGIA Architects to build 
two, 4 bedroom units for the mentally retarded under 
the CH 589 Program. The Authority is currently work- 
ing with the Executive Office of Communities & 
Development, the Executive Office of Mental Retarda- 
tion and MGIA Architects, Inc. on the design of the 
units. Construction is anticipated to begin in 1993. 



The Authority recently completed two modernization 
projects. One project vinly-sided the community 
residence at 34 Middlesex Street, No. Chelmsford. The 
other project converted the water tanks heated by elec- 
tricity to gas boiler/storage tanks at Chelmsford Arms, 
1 Smith Street, Chelmsford. These projects were design- 
ed to assist the Authority in not only saving money, but 
also to conserve energy. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as of 
June 30, 1991 provide a total of 353 units of low income 
housing: 198 Elderly, 14 Handicapped, and 141 Fami- 
ly. Six of these programs are funded by the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts through the Executive Of- 
fice of Communities and Development under Chapter 
667, Chapter 705, and Chapter 707. 

Chelmsford Arms, completed in 1974, has 56 regular 
units and 8 handicapped units. The Community 
Residence for the mildly to moderately retarded was 
purchased in 1974 and has 6 units. Six 2 bedroom con- 
dominiums in Pickwick Estates were purchased in 1981. 
McFarlin Manor, completed in 1981 has 43 regular 
units, 3 handicapped units, and one 4 bedroom con- 
gregate unit which serves the semi-independent elder- 
ly. These are all funded under Chapter 667. Under 
Chapter 707, the Authority's "Scattered Site" program 
that began in Chelmsford in 1974, the Authority has 
26 units currently under lease in the private market. At 
one time the Authority had 33 units, however, due to 
State budget cuts 7 units were lost. Under the Chapter 
705 Family Program, 11 units are scattered around 
Chelmsford. 

The Section 8 Programs are funded by the Federal 
government through the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development. The Section 8 Existing Housing 
Program presently has 58 certificates under lease in the 
private market throughout Chelmsford and other com- 
munities and 84 vouchers under the Section 8 Voucher 
Program. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority fiscal year ending 
of June 30, 1991 lists assets at $4,243,371.00, liabilities 
at $4,243,371.00 for all programs. All developments are 
inspected annually by maintenance and administrative 
staff. The Authority is especially grateful to those 
organizations which express special concern for the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority residents and to the 
Chelmsford Garden Club for their assistance in the 
beautification of the developments every year. 

Members of the staff include Lisa Royce, Executive 
Director, Helen Cantara, Administrative Assistant, Lin- 
da Dalton, Junior Clerk, Robert Trainor, Full-time 
Maintenance Mechanic, Richard O'Neil, Part-time 
Maintenance Laborer and Paul St. Louis, Full-time 
Groundskeeper. 

Regular meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 
Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday each 



69 



month. The Annual Meeting is first Tuesday in May. 
All meetings are open to the public. The Chelmsford 
Housing Authority Board of Commissioners would like 
to thank the residents of Chelmsford and Town Officials 
for their continued support and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 







TERM 


NAME 


TITLE 


EXPIRES 


Ruth K. Delaney 


Chairman 


1995 


Robert L. Hughes 


Vice Chairman 


1993 


William P. Keohane 


Treasurer 


1996 


Lynn M. Marcella 


Asst. Treasurer 


1993 


Pamela A. Turnbull 


Member 
(State Appointee) 


1992 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, 25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

Sarah Warner, Chair 

D. Lorraine Lambert, Vice-Chair 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 

Kay Roberts, Secretary 

Janet Hendl 

Nancy Knight 

Lynda Warren 

The mission of the Chelmsford Public Library is to 
select, acquire, organize, store, and make easily accessi- 
ble to all the people in Chelmsford, materials which will 
meet their informational, educational, and recreational 
needs. Materials are selected to satisfy residents as in- 
dividuals, with concern for all ages, backgrounds, 
abilities, and levels of education. Hours, materials, and 
services should be in sufficient supply to make the 
library a dependable resource for most residents most 
of the time. 

The Library recognizes its obligations to provide 
library services to handicapped residents who are 
prevented from using the library facilities due to struc- 
tural barriers. To that end, an alternative method of ser- 
vice delivery will be provided when access is inhibited. 
The method will be determined on an individual basis 
with concern for individual needs. Furthermore, the 
Board of Library Trustees will continue to work toward 
a library facility which is fully accessible to all. 

Services and Circulation: With the failure of the 
library's override vote in June, the library sustained a 
second year of budget cuts. These cuts were the 
equivalent of a 27% reduction in staff hours and a 38% 
reduction in the book budget. It failed to meet the 



minimum municipal appropriation standard mandated 
by State of Massachusetts which disqualified it for State 
Certification. The library circulated 300,284 items dur- 
ing 1991 and answered an average of over 226 reference 
questions each week. A specialized collection of job and 
career materials was established through funding from 
the Friends of the Library in order to meet the ever in- 
creasing demand of job seekers. 

Programs: The library sponsored lectures and pro- 
grams throughout the year. These ranged from a suc- 
cessful Book Discussion Series funded through the MA 
Council for the Arts and Humanities to a Children's 
magic show. 

The MacKay Branch Library's Mystery Book Group 
met weekly. An average of 7 storytimes were conducted 
for pre-school children each week at the Children's 
House and MacKay Branch Library. Over 800 children 
participated in the Summer Reading Program at the 
Children's House and MacKay Branch Library. 

Volunteers: The library depended on volunteer help 
throughout the year to assist in a variety of tasks which 
included shelving, storytimes, painting, filing, typing 
and genealogical research. Staff and Trustees thaked all 
the volunteers with a reception in December. 

The Friends of the Library worked throughout the 
year sorting and pricing books for their annual booksale. 
Proceeds from the Friends fund raising efforts supported 
library services and collections including a subscription 
to a CD-ROM periodical index; museum passes, books 
on job hunting and careers; and various children's 
programs. 

Facilities: Reorganization continued in the Adams 
Library. Additional shelving was added to the basement 
level of Adams in order to alleviate overcrowding. New 
circulation desks in the Children's Library and Adams 
were provided through State Aid funding. 

Personnel: Due to budget reductions, the Assistant 
Director's position was not funded. Joseph Wisniewski, 
Head of Reference, resigned after his position was 
reduced to part-time. 

Library Site Committee: For nearly 18 months, the 
Library Site Committee did extensive research of possi- 
ble sites that would be suitable for a new library. In 
December, the Site Committee recommended to the 
Library Board of Trustees, a piece of school owned pro- 
perty on Old Westford Road which is located between 
the McCarthy School track and Davis Road. In addi- 
tion, the Chelmsford School Committee agreed to allow 
the Library Site Committee to explore the possibility 
of acquiring this land. 

At their December 11, 1991, the Library Board of 
Trustees voted to pursue the feasibility of the McCar- 
thy School site as the location of a new library. 



70 



Goals: The Library Trustees, Site Committee, and En- 
dowment Committee will continue to work for a new 
or expanded library facility and for quality library ser- 
vice for residents. 

Statistical Reports 



Monies deposited with the Town Treasurer 

from fee, fine and lost materials 
Circulation: 300,284 
Staff: 10 full time 
15 part time 

Departments: 

Reference: Sandra Yensen 
Children's: Cheryl Zani 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 
Community Services: Judy Buswick 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Technical Services: Laura Kulik 
Maintenance: John Reslow 



$17,572 



Library Site Committee 

D. Lorraine Lamber, Chair 

Kathryn Brough 

William Gilet 

Gregory Gilleland 

Dorothea Howard 

Cynthia Kaplan 

Nancy Knight 

Carl Olsson 

Al Sidel 

John Sousa 

Sarah Warner 

Mary Mahoney, ex-officio 



Respectfully submitted, 

Mary E. Mahoney 
Library Director 



71 



PLANNING BOARD 




(Front) Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman; Kim J. MacKenzie. Chairman; Eugene diet, Clerk; (Rear) Christine 
A. Gleason; James P. Good; Ann H. McCarthy; John F. McCarthy 



Kim J. MacKenzie, Chairman 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman 
Eugene E. Gilet, Clerk 
Christine A. Gleason 
James P. Good 
Ann H. McCarthy- 
John F. McCarthy 
Rayann E. Miethe, Principal Clerk 

At the re-organizational meeting of 1991, the 
Chelmsford Planning Board elected the above-named 
officers. Mr. Eugene Gilet was also chosen to be the 
Board's representative to the Northern Middlesex 
Council of Governments. Due to budget problems we 
are all facing, a major change was decided to keep the 
office open only on a part-time basis. Therefore the 
hours of the Planning Board are currently 8:30 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. 

The purpose of the Planning Board, which was 
established by the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 70, is to make a careful study of 
the town's resources, as well as its needs, keeping in 
mind conditions which may prove injurious to the 



health and welfare of the town's citizens, making plans 
for the development of the town and appropriate hous- 
ing of its citizens. Additional functions may include 
reporting annually to Town Meeting and having an of- 
ficial map prepared. 

In the year 1991, the economic crisis has affected 
everyone, especially the construction industry. 
Therefore the Town of Chelmsford had a decrease in 
its construction and the trend may continue. In the 
future, however, the Planning Board is hoping to see 
an increase in the commercial aspect of our community, 
and by working with new businessses, we are trying to 
help revive Chelmsford's economy. 

A total of fourteen (14) hearings were held. At the 
hearings various issues and concerns were discussed 
resulting in one (1) subdivision consisting of two (2) lots 
on Boston Road being approved, as well as fifteen (15) 
Form A Plans Subdivision Control Law Not Required 
and five (5) Site Plans approved. One site plan was in- 
itiated in 1991 and currently is still in the approval 
process. 



72 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




(Front) Jeffrey Metivier, Student Representative; Judith Mallette, Chairman; Richard Moser, Superintendent. 
(Rear) Carl Olsson; Wendy Marcks; Barbara Ward, Secretary; Mary Frantz, Vice Chairman. 



The 1991 calendar year has been filled with success 
for the Chelmsford School Department. Supported by 
the passage of a $950,000 override and $610,935 of 
salary concessions from all school personnel, the School 
Committee was able to retain over eighty positions and 
$400,000 of operating expenses. The School Commit- 
tee and all school personnel are appreciative of the sup- 
port demonstrated by the entire school community. 
Education remains a high priority in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts. 



WE BELIEVE 

EDUCATION IS VITAL TO A DEMOCRATIC 
SOCIETY. 

EDUCATION REQUIRES AN ACTIVE PART- 
NERSHIP AMONG ALL SECTORS OF OUR 
COMMUNITY. 

EDUCATION IS THE RIGHT OF ALL 
CHILDREN, NOT A PRIVILEGE. 



Mrs. Judith Mallette has served as chairman of the 
School Committee; Mrs. Mary Frantz, vice chairman; 
Mrs. Barbara Ward, secretary; Carl Olsson and Wendy 
Marcks, members at large. The major work of the com- 
mittee has been in the area of policy development, up- 
dating our policy book and setting new policy impor- 
tant to the effective functioning of our schools. 

Under the leadership of Superintendent Richard 
Moser, Assistant Superintendent David Troughton, 
Business Manager Sylvester Ingeme, and Director of 
Educational Technology Bernard DiNatale, an exten- 
sive planning activity has been conducted to build a 
foundation for future educational programs. Eight 
"beliefs" important to quality education were 
developed and adopted by the School Committee in 
December 1991. The eight beliefs include: 



EDUCATION IS COMPROMISED BY A 
LACK OF RESOURCES. 

EDUCATION PROVIDES THE TOOLS FOR 
LIFELONG LEARNING. 

EDUCATION REQUIRES A COMMITMENT 
TO ALL ASPECTS OF A CHILD'S GROWTH 
AND DEVELOPMENT. 

SCHOOLS MUST REFLECT A COMFORT- 
ABLE ATMOSPHERE WHERE STUDENTS 
FEEL SUPPORTED IN THEIR EDUCA- 
TIONAL PURSUITS: WHERE NEW BEGIN- 
NINGS ARE ENCOURAGED. 

SCHOOLS ENCOMPASS A COMMUITY OF 
LEARNERS WHERE ALL STUDENTS CAN 
LEARN AT DIFFERENT TIMES, RATES AND 
WAYS. 



73 



Following the development of the belief structure, a 
mission statement was constructed to guide all future 
planning activities. 

THE MISSION OF THE CHELMSFORD 
SCHOOLS IS TO CULTIVATE THE 
DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENTS INTO 
EDUCATED, SELF-CONFIDENT, LIFELONG 
LEARNERS AND RESPONSIBLE CITIZENS 
WHO POSSESS PERSONAL INTEGRITY AND 
THE ABILITY TO SUCCEED IN A GLOBAL 
SOCIETY. 

Next steps in the planning process include the 
development of specific action plans for improvement 
in the areas of policy development, curriculum, 
teaching, staffing, budgeting, facility development, 
management, and community partnerships. The 
Chelmsford School Committee and central office ad- 
ministration believe careful planning, sound fiscal 
management, and a constant focus on the needs and 
interests of children are central to our success. 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

The Class of 1991 graduated 378 students. This was 
the lowest number of students to graduate from 
Chelmsford High School in over a decade. The decline 
in enrollment at the high school level is consistent with 
the national trend and all evidence leads us to believe 
that we will reach a plateau for the next few years. 

In addition to declining enrollment we were also con- 
fronted with a decline of resources, which forced us to 
address our mission and reprioritize. 

The 1990-91 academic year at Chelmsford High 
School was a positive and productive year in terms of 
meeting the needs of the students. This general assess- 
ment was determined by the normal measure of stu- 
dent attendance, student achievements in standardiz- 
ed testing, behavior outcomes, community service and 
performances; staff attendance and staff assessment of 
student achievement. 

As Principal, I had three general goals for the year 
which focues on increasing and improving communica- 
tions with the students, staff and community at large 
and in arranging a business/industrial council. These 
goals, of course, are on-going; however, it appears that 
with the positive outcome of the override vote for 
education that the commuity is well-informed and sup- 
portive of the students and the schools. The business/in- 
dustrial council has produced specific links which will 
be explored in the 1991-1992 academic year. 

In an effort to involve more parents at the High 
School, we phased out the Parent Advisory council and 
formed a Parent Teachers Organization. 



In August/September a document is produced for 
distribution to the Superintendent, School Committee 
and the press which specifically states statistical data 
of the graduting class. Since all of the data has not been 
gathered as of this writing, that report will be submit- 
ted under separate cover. It is safe to say, however, that 
the Class of 1991 was one which set an excellent exam- 
ple for the underclasses. The maturity level of the Class 
of 1991 set the tone for the entire student body. 

As mentioned above, the data reported on the 
graduating class is specific relative to academics, 
achievements and future plans. I would be remiss if I 
did not include in this report some of the individual 
honors bestowed upon our students such as Presiden- 
tial Scholar, National Merit Finalists and Commenda- 
tion Winners. Athletic All- Americans, National and 
State Student Council Presidents, six Boy Scout Eagles, 
and six Girl Scout Gold Medalists. 

We initiated additional programs with the University 
of Lowell Graduate School of Education, College of 
Music and College of Engineering. We hosted two ses- 
sions of the Merrimack Education Center/Digital Equip- 
ment Corporation "Engineers into Education' - program 
which resulted in the installation of the Telecommuni- 
cations Mass. Learn Pike. 

We experienced some unanticipated cuts at the outset 
of the academic year which resulted in the reduction 
of the physical education offerings and subsequently in 
a change of graduation requirements. These cuts also 
included an adjustment in the basic science classes and 
in the procurement policy of hiring substitutes for the 
professional as well as the support staff. The transition 
took place in a cooperative manner and without any 
disruptions. 

User fees were instituted for all co-curricular programs 
and for student parking privileges. A rationale was com- 
muicated to students and parents and the cooperation 
was exemplary as the student participation levels were 
commendable and no student was denied the oppor- 
tunity to participate due to financial need. 

We were forced to cancel our foreign exchange trips 
due to the conflict in the Middle East. However, since 
the conflict was resolved in a short period of time we 
were able to restore our trip to England in June. 

In spite of the decline in enrollment and in resources 
Chelmsford High School still had: 

1 Presidential Scholar 

8 National Merit Finalists 

20 Commended Students 

75% Entered 4 year colleges 

9% Entered 2 year colleges 

2% Entered technical schools 

14% Work, travel, military 



74 



Through the eleemosynary activities of the Chelms- 
ford Rotary, the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks, the All 
Sports Boosters, the Friends of Music, the taxpayers 
support of the 2Vi override and the staff accepting a pay 
freeze we were able to deliver the same services in 
1991-1992. 

As the High School Principal I want to express my 
heartfelt appreciation to everyone for their support as 
it was imperative that the High School conduct our ten 
year self -assessment and evaluation on a positive note. 
Once this process is completed we will then be evaluated 
by the team of educators from throughout New 
England who will hopefully grant us accreditation as 
successfully meeting the standards set forth by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges. 



by either a technical education, art, music, or home 
economics teacher. These five teachers are responsible 
for the same group of students all day long. This close 
contact with the same group of students provides the 
teaching staff with the opportuity to discuss the needs 
of individual students, to modify the curriculum when 
appropriate, and provide for the optimum delivery of 
services. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR MATHEMATICS GRADES 9-12 



from the principal of 
the McCarthy middle school 



The Chelmsford High School Mathematics Depart- 
ment continues to adapt its curriculum to meet the 
needs of our students while continuing to wrestle with 
fiscal limitations. 



The mission of the McCarthy Middle School is to pro- 
vide the students with the opportunity to be involved 
in a learning environment that prepares them for future 
growth. 

The curriculum should reflect the nature of change 
in our environment. We must constantly reorganize to 
meet the changes in a dynamic universe. There must 
be exposure to art, and other forms of multi-cultural 
expression, to social trends and habits, to political and 
economic diversity. The curriculum must focus on 
teaching students how to learn, how to think, how to 
organize thoughts, and how to systematically arrive at 
the solution to problems. 

The enrollment of the school remains at approximate- 
ly 1,130 students in grades six through eight. Signifi- 
cant changes continue to be made in both the cur- 
riculum and the manner in which services are delivered 
to the students. 

The integration program for special needs students 
has been expanded to include both sixth and seventh 
grade students. In this program, the special education 
students receive their instruction in both science and 
social studies in the mainstream classroom. The instruc- 
tional responsibilities for these students is shared by 
both the regular education and the special education 
teachers. Initial evaluation of this program has shown 
that it has been well received by students, parents, and 
staff. 

After several months of committee work and in- 
service meetings, we have organized the seventh grade 
students and staff into instructional teams. This struc- 
ture has been well received by both students and the 
staff members involved. Each team is comprised of a 
language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies 
teacher. Each of the four quarters this team is joined 



Hewlett-Packard donated thirty high-powered graphic 
calculators to Chelmsford High School and offered 
training workshops to all high school Mathematics and 
Science teachers. Donna Foley, Joseph Ford, Richard 
Olson, Anna Swierzbin. Barry Ware. Andrew Pasquale, 
Rebecca Nordengren, George Pollard, and John 
Ramalho were the mathematics teachers who attend- 
ed these workshops. 

Two new textbooks. Essentials of Mathematics and 
Consumer Mathematics were adopted and are now be- 
ing used in our Basic Skills I and Basic Skills III courses. 
Textbooks Review committees are perusing various 
texts for possible adoption in Geometry Honors. 
Algebra One, Advanced Mathematics Honors, Algebra 
Two Honors, Algebra Three and Trigonometry and 
Calculus. Hopefully new textbooks will be adopted and 
purchased for these subjects over the next three 
academic school years. 

Our students continue to perform well above the state 
and national averages on the Mathematics section of 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test. As usual, our students did 
extremely well on the Advanced Placement Examina- 
tions in Calculus AB. Calculus BC and Computer 
Science. Unfortunately, due to fiscal constraints and 
lack of sufficient enrollment, it does not appear that the 
Advanced Calculus AP or the Computer Science AP 
courses will be able to run in the 1991-1992 academic 
school years. 

At a time when there is much statewide and national 
concern with respect to mathematics education and in- 
struction, Chelmsford High School remains fortunate 
to possess a highly motivated, well qualified, dedicated 
and diversified staff. It is their constant efforts that will 
enable us to provide the students of Chelmsford High 
School with the skills necessary for them to succeed in 
our increasingly complex and changing society. 



75 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH (GRADES 9-12) 

The English Department at the high school is quite 
pleased with the inauguration of our "The Writings On 
the Wall" ' program; this effort has brought recognition 
to students who have experienced success in compos- 
ing a piece of writing. The teachers in the department 
have submitted writings for display in the main cor- 
ridor. Our hope is to extend the opportunity to students 
in all subject areas. 

In addition, our students have received recognition 
through participation in a variety of activities. Louise 
Chen, Katie McSheehy and Patrick McCullum, all 
members of the Class of 1994, were honored for their 
achievements in writing through the UMass/ Amherst 
Excellence in Expository Writing Program. Keith Pat- 
ton, a member of the Class of 1991, was awarded the 
Bard College Prize for Critical Writing. Sara Goldreich, 
a member of the Class of 1993, placed locally and 
regionally in the Voice of Democracy speech writing 
contest sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars. The 
achievement of a third place in the state and sixteenth 
nationally was earned by our top ten scorers in the na- 
tional Ninth Grade Language Arts Olympiad. Our 
honors students continue to perform exceptionally well 
on the English AP standardized exam. 

Through the efforts of Bernie DiNatale, Director of 
Educational Technology, our writing lab was upgrad- 
ed from Apple to Macintosh computers; this allowed 
more sophisticated formating of writing by students in 
our writing electives and year-long English classes; this 
also allowed our journalism students an opportunity to 
experience desktop publishing. We look forward to in- 
creasing students' critical thinking skills through use of 
computers and various teaching strategies including the 
Great Books approach. Chelmsford will be a workshop 
sight for this approach in April of 1992. The teachers 
of eleventh and twelfth grade English courses have been 
incorporating the study of art into the curriculum begin- 
ning with summer workshops provided through the ef- 
fort of Dr. David Troughton, Assistant Superintendent 
of Curriculum. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES (GRADES 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Social Studies Depart- 
ment has remained committed to preparing students 
to be responsible citizens of the United States of 
America and of an ever changing, ever shrinking world. 
This is accomplished through a curriculum that usual- 
ly includes Political Science in the 9th grade, World or 
Ancient History in the 10th grade, U.S. History in the 
11th grade and a series of semester and year-long elec- 
tives. The electives include courses such as Economics, 
Sociology, Asian History, International Relations, The 
Holocaust, Law, etc. 



The department has continued to provide a variety 
of educational opportunities that extend beyond the 
classroom and the regular school day. Student Govern- 
ment Day, The Chelmsford Education Foundation 
News Quiz, International Relations Club activities, 
Citizen Bee, National History Day and The Fram- 
ingham State College Essay Contest are some of these 
opportunities. Speakers have also been invited into the 
school and field trips are taken to places such as 
Newport, Plymouth, Sturbridge, Boston and New York. 

Experienced teachers in the department have been in- 
volved in preparation for accreditation. They have serv- 
ed on a variety of committees at school and dealing with 
system-wide topics. They have also continued their pro- 
fessional growth through reading, classes, workshops 
and regional conferences. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE (GRADES 9-12) 

The 1990-1991 school year was a busy one for the 
science department. Once again many of the members 
of the science staff participated in a variety of 
workshops, conferences and courses. 

Mr. Bernard Queenan was accepted into the Lablink 
2000 program offered by Boston University's School of 
Medicine. This program is an eight month commitment 
of Saturdays and a three week summer session. The 
focus of the program is to update the teacher in the field 
of biotechnology. 

Mr. Michael Winn, Mrs Cheryl Mamalis and Mr. 
Michael Tate were also updated in the area of 
biotechnology at a three week summer workshop spon- 
sored by the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. Mr. 
Richard Luce and Mr. John Prescott participated in a 
program at the University of Massachusetts Medical 
Center. The program addressed new developments in 
DNA, the effects of smoking and alzheimers disease. 

Mr. Bruce Ford received a mini-grant for the develop- 
ment of a series of visitations to various industries in 
the area. The intent is to bring to the classroom applica- 
tions that are being utilized by local industries. Mr. 
Mosto and Mr. Sorenson also participated. 

There were two summer workshops held at the high 
school, both in the area of chemistry. The objective of 
the first one was to integrate a new textbook into the 
level III chemistry curriculum. The result was a cur- 
riculum change from number crunching to a more con- 
ceptual approach. From all indications the change was 
a successful one. The second workshop was on com- 
puter applications in the chemistry lab. Mr. Ralph Sher- 
wood, Mrs. Cheryl Mamalis, Mr. Frank Turner, Mr. 
Michael Tate and Mr. Andy Sorenson participated in 
these workshops. 

Once again thank you for your continued support. 



76 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH 

(GRADES K-12) 

During the past year a series of "Growing Healthy" 
workshops was held to continue the phase-in of the new 
health education curricuum in grades K-5. Teachers as 
well as guidance counselors and nurses participated. 
The workshop series will be completed early next year. 

Last spring over 60% of our 8th grade students earn- 
ed CPR certification as a result of an innovative, joint 
effort of the middle school health education staff and 
the office of community education. This fall the mid- 
dle school health education staff attended a "Skills for 
Adolescence" curriculum training workshop (core of the 
7th grade program) in order to incorporate this program 
into 8th grade health education. 

Ongoing and future projects include definition of a 
town wide AIDS education Curriculum, revision of the 
6th grade health education curriculum, analysis of and 
program planning for the health and physical educa- 
tion needs of students in grades 9-12, and development 
of a health and physical education newsletter. 



FROM THE PROGRAM 

SUPERVISOR FOR ATHLETICS 

(GRADES 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department 
during the 1990-91 school year fielded 29 varsity teams, 
12 junior varsity teams, 1 sophomore team, and 8 
freshman teams. An overall record from 349 varsity con- 
tests was 202-134-13 with a total of 1,009 athletes com- 
peting. The department finished seventh for the Dalton 
Trophy as the most winning program in all of Division I. 



Advanced Placement Program 

In May of 1991, 113 students took 169 Advanced 
Placement examinations at Chelmsford High School 
with 75% of the grades falling in the 3-5 range. The pro- 
gram grades on a five-point college-level scale: 

5— extremely well qualified 

4— well qualified 

3— qualified 

2— possibly qualified 

1— no recommendation 

Generally, AP grades of 4 and 5 are comparable to 
college grades of A, and grades of 3 and 2 most com- 
parable to college grades of B and C, respectively. Many 
colleges will award a third to a full year of placement 
and credit to successful AP candidates. 

Drop Out Rate: 

The drop out rate at Chelmsford High School con- 
tinues to be low. During the 1990-91 academic year, 
CHS had a total student enrollment of 1516. The 
number of drop outs was 19, which represents a drop 
out rate of 1.2%. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1990-91 






Req. to 

Employment Leave 
Boys 2 
Girls 1 


Voluntary 
Withdrawal 

6 

10 


Total 
8 
11 


Total 3 


16 


19 



Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores (SAT) 

Chelmsford High School average scores for the Class 
of 1991 continue to be higher than the average Massa- 
chusetts and National scores. 



GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

Post Secondary Education Placements 

In 1991 , there were 378 graduates. Of those graduates, 
324 went on to post-secondary education which 
represents 86%. 



4 year colleges 
2 year colleges 
technical schools 


282 

35 


(75%) 
(9%) 


and post graduates 


7 


(2% ) 




324 


86% 



In terms of non-educational placements, 42 students 
elected employment, ten joined the military, and two 
students were undecided. 



In the verbal area, Chelmsford's average score was 
457 which is 31 points higher than the state average 
(426) and 35 points higher than the national average 

(422). 

In the math area, Chelmsford's average score was 503 
which is 33 points higher than the state average (470) 
and 29 points higher than the national average (474). 

Service Study and Career Exploration Programs 

In the 1990-91 academic year, 131 students enrolled 
in eight Service Study and Career Exploration programs. 

These two programs are elective, designed to com- 
bine practical experience with the students' academic 
studies as they use their free time to pursue an area 
similar to their chosen field. All students are placed in 
their preferred area and credits are earned according 



77 



to the number of periods they work, their performance 
and attendance. 

Career Center 

The Chelmsford High School Career Center continues 
to be a model for student awareness of college, voca- 
tional and career information. Students and parents use 
this facility for college search, occupations, descriptions 
of various career options, employment and also as a 
study area. 

College representatives and speakers, as well as 
various military personnel are hosted in this area. Job 
postings are available to students. Counselors and 
teachers bring classess and homerooms to the Career 
Center to introduce students to the facility. 

The Career Center is stocked with up-to-date college 
catalogues, college applications and financial aid infor- 
mation. Additionally, computers and Video Cassette 
Recorders are available to search for colleges, job 
descriptions, financial aid and scholarships. 

The Career Center is open from 8:00 a.m. until 1:00 
p.m. for students, parents, and the Chelmsford com- 
mumity at large. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF PRACTICAL ARTS 7-12 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Business Department presently has five staff 
members with expertise in a wide range of Business and 
Distributive Education subject areas. Subjects taught are 
Introduction to Business. Typing I, Typing II, Accoun- 
ting I. Accounting II. Word Processing I. Word Process- 
ing II. Fashion Merchandising, and Marketing. For the 
1990-1991 school year a change was made in the Typ- 
ing curriculum in which typing was changed from a full 
year class to a semester class. This was done to allow 
more students to elect to take Typing backed up to 
another semester course in the Business area or another 
discipline. This was continued for the 1991-1992 school 
year as many students did take advantage of the 
semester approach to typing. 

1991 represented an outstanding year for the 
Marketing classes at C.H.S. The Marketing Club 
presented its annual Spring & Summer Fashion Show 
Fundraiser in conjunction with several local retailers. 
Strutting fashions geared to all the senior week festivities 
were 40 C.H.S. Marketing/Merchandising students. The 
crowd viewed a partiotic theme of colorful Champion 
Sweats furnished by Patterson's of Lowell. Image Hair 
Solon presented its hand painted collection of dresses, 
sweatshirts and sneakers as well as providing com- 
plimentary hairstyles and make-overs for th student 
models. Pamela's provided much of the casual 60's in- 



fluence with black stretch pants and leggings coor- 
dinated with oversized looks in hand painted and ap- 
plique designs. The Gap provided classics focusing on 
jeans and cotton attire. The Fashion Bug provided baby 
doll dresses, pant suits and the nautical influence. After- 
noon Delight featured city shorts, separates and 
black/white semi-formals. The highlight of the evening 
was formal wear from the House of Concetta. Marnae's, 
and the Billerica House of Gowns. The fashion focus 
was mini-prom gowns in shades of ruby, fuchsia, royal 
blue and black. The males were not to be outdone as 
they appeared dapper in formal wear from Sully's of 
Chelmsford and Bedford/Billerica Formal Shop in 
North Billerica. Bill Spence acted as the disc jockey and 
emcee for the event. Proceeds from the show helped 
fund Marketing Career Conferences as well as awards 
to Merchandising Students. 

The Marketing Club experienced another successful 
year as 62 students participated at the District Level 
Career Conference in which 38 students captured top 
honors qualifying them to represent Chelmsford at the 
State Career Conference in which over 700 students 
throughout Massachusetts participate. At the District 
Conference seven students won first place trophies, six 
students won second place trophies, and nine students 
won third place trophies, while sixteen students receiv- 
ed certificate of merit for placing within the top seven 
of their category. Chelmsford swept awards in District 
5 qualifying 38 students for the State Conference. At 
the State Career Conference, ten Chelmsford students 
received plaques for placing as a top ten finalist in all 
four competitive events, and five students received first, 
second or third place trophies qualifying them to attend 
the National Career Conference in Denver, Colorado. 
Experiencing the thrill of a National Conference with 
over 8,000 students in attendance were Manjula Sastry 
in the area of Fashion Promotion, Ethan Roberts in 
Food Marketing, Kerry Sousa in Apparel and Ac- 
cessories, Anurag Nigam in Finance and Credit, Christi 
Cobery in General Marketing, and Beverly Conway the 
Marketing Advisor. Local businesses helping to defray 
total expenses included the Chelmsford Police Union, 
The Chelmsford Rotary Club. Paramount Cleaners. 
Notini's. Inc., and Label Art Inc. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The goal of the Home Economics Department is to 
provide students in grades 7 through 12 with practical 
life skills. Because both parents are often working, or 
single parent families exist, there is a need for young 
people to accept responsibility at an early age. 

Home Economics begins at the 7th and 8th grade level 
with a 10 week program that introduces both boys and 
girls to the basic skills in cooking, sewing, consumerism, 
and decision making. The curriculum continues with 
electives at the High School that include Chef's courses. 
Foods, Family Living, Sewing, and Child Development. 
The Early Childhood Education Program, using the 
Community Education sponsored Pre-School as a 



78 



laboratory for the high school students, continues to 
be successful. With the increase in number of students 
electing Early Childhood classes, the Child Care Center 
was able to be open until 1:50 p.m. Some of our stu- 
dents continued their education in this field, as more 
care giving services are needed. Education for child care 
and parenting will become more important in the next 
decade. 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

Students at the McCarthy Middle School enjoy the 
designing and construction of a race car and the design 
and construction of a dream house. Although every stu- 
dent has Technology Education classes for only one 
quarter of the school year, they seem to benefit from 
the class and receive a great deal of insight into the 
World of Technology that is just ahead for them. 

Because of a reduction in staff, Grades 9-12 saw a 
reduction in the number of course opportunities for the 
students to choose from the courses remaining, saw a 
significant increase in class size. Courses offered in the 
Tchnology Education Department include: 



GENERAL DRAFTING 
ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 
TECH. ED. EXPLORATORY 
HOUSE CONSTRUCTION 



TECHNICAL DRAWING 
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS FINE 

FURNITURE CONSTRUCTION 
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR 



It is my hope that parents will research these courses 
and encourage their daughters and sons to sign up and 
take a few of these courses while at C.H.S. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(GRADES 7-12) 

At CHS, the changes in the course names in the 
Spanish and French sequences continued this year. The 
"A" designation used with the Italian and Latin courses 
was eliminated since it was an unnecessary part of each 
course name. The "A" designation will also be 
eliminated in the Spanish and French sequences as we 
continue the process of combining courses which have 
the same basic curriculum. 

At McCarthy, the course names were changed to 
Spanish and French I and II. Because students in the 
8th grade are no longer able to begin a foreign language, 
we saw an increase this year in the number of 7th 
graders opting to begin either French or Spanish. The 
FLEX course was not offered because of low enrollment, 
but it will be offered again next year as an 8th grade 
course. 

Also, in the area of curriculum, a new text was chosen 
for the Latin program. Starting next year in Latin I we 
will be using the Jenny series published by Prentice-Hall. 
This new text series will also be implemented in Latin 
II, III. and IV during the next four years. 



CHS was not immune from the effects of the Gulf 
War, and for the first time since the French Exchange 
was started 15 years ago, we did not send a group of 
students to France. The Exchangs to Spain and Italy 
were also cancelled because of concern over foreign 
travel. We did, however, maintain the hosting part of 
the program, and we welcomed groups from Spain and 
Italy in September and a group from France in April. 
There is every expectation that the Exchange Program 
will return to normal next year. 

Funds which were available through the Staff 
Development account provided opportunities for 
members of the department to attend workshops on 
topics such as teaching Advanced Placement Spanish, 
incorporating higher order thinking skills in the foreign 
language class, using video and realia; and building self- 
esteem in language students. Curriculum work on 
enrichment activities for Spanish I, II and III was also 
funded through the Staff Development monies. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR FINE ARTS (GRADES K 12) 

Chelmsford Public Schools continues to maintain its 
reputation of providing an excellent Fine Arts educa- 
tion. Thanks to the leadership of Dr. Moser, the efforts 
of many, many people and the support of the com- 
mumity, an override was passed last spring. This ac- 
complishment allowed us to continue to offer art, music 
and instrumental instruction system-wide and the 
dedication of a fine staff has enabled our programs to 
grow. 

Many students from our Chorus, Band and Orchestra 
were selected to perform at district, regional, All-State 
and All-Eastern competitions. The Select Band from 
McCarthy Middle School received a Gold Medal for 
their outstanding performance at the Massachusetts In- 
strumental Conductors Association competition. The 
Art Department was well represented in both the 
Boston Globe Show and Art All-State. Chelmsford 
Public Schools gains recogition when student ac- 
complishments are recognized in these state wide com- 
petitive exhibitions and performances. 

The Choral and Instrumental groups in each school 
held a Winter Concert and a Spring Concert, in addi- 
tion, choral students in grades four to twelve gathered 
in March for a Town-Wide Choral Festival, Elementary, 
Middle and High School strings players performed 
together in May at a town-wide Strings Festival and 
Band members from grades five to twelve marched in 
Chelmsford's Memorial Day and Fourth of July 
Parades. 

A new Art Show was hung in the upper level of the 
Frank Page Gallery about once a month. Students from 
each school had opportunities to have their work 
selected. In March, the entire gallery was filled with stu- 



79 



dent artwork and every art teacher participated in an 
Opening Reception for the artists and their parents. 

Pride in these successes is shared by all the teachers 
who have taught and encouraged students. The foun- 
dation for these accomplishments is built in Elemen- 
tary and Middle School art and music classes where 
students learn the basic concepts and skills as well as 
the sense of personal satisfaction that is an essential pro- 
duct of creative education. Every child benefits when 
our fine and performing arts programs support and 
enhance regular classroom learning while providing ex- 
ceptional students with opportunities to excel. This 
commitment to provide art and music education reflects 
a dedication to educational excellence in Chelmsford. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES (GRADES 6-8) 

The school year coincides with the celebration of the 
500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' discovery. 
As a result, many classes began readings, discussions 
and projects dealing with this great event. The Bill of 
Rights 200th anniversary was celebrated with plays, 
newspaper articles and bulletin boards. The annual 
geography bee sponsored by National Geographic 
Society was held earier this year in December. Six grade 
classes continue to work diligently with current events. 
Team I. 6th grade, again presented a short program on 
Veteran's Day. There has been a concerted effort to 
celebrate the holidays that affect social studies i.e. Mar- 
tin Luther King. Lincoln, Washington and Memorial 
Day. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE (GRADES 6-8) 

Over the three years of middle school science, the 
students cover the physical sciences and environmen- 
tal issues in the sixth grade; the life sciences in the 
seventh grade; and the earth sciences in the eighth 
grade. 

The major goal of the middle school science curricula 
is to teach the students organization, listening, notetak- 
ing, logical thinking, and concept formation skills. 
These skills will assist them in the understanding and 
interpretation of the world around them. As the three 
years progress, students will become more involved in 
problem solving situations where they must form 
hypotheses, experiment, observe, record measured and 
collected data, and analyze results to form conclusions. 

During the 1991-1992 academic year, the teachers in 
the science department, in addition to their regular 
classes, have been involved in the piloting and evalua- 
tion of new science texts, the revising of curricula, the 



planning of science field trips, and the participation in 
inservice workshops and conferences on such topics as 
curriculum changes, new technology, co-operative lear- 
ning and mainstreaming. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH (GRADES 6-8) 

During released time days and summer workshops, 
language arts teachers were able to begin up-dating the 
curriculum and re-evaluating departmental goals and 
objectives. Of special note are the expansion of a poetry 
component at grade 8 and also the development of a 
speech component at grade 8. Teachers at grade 7 have 
been learning to adapt to the teaming organization new- 
ly introduced at that level. They are concerned with 
maintaining basic skills and curriculum components 
while trying to develop interdisciplinary projects. This 
year also found more youngsters able to take advantage 
of word processing facilities in our computer lab. 

Again this year the Language Arts Department con- 
ducted the Lowell Sun Spelling Bee; the Chamber 
Repertory Theater performed for students and was 
funded by Showboat, the annual student/faculty talent 
show. The Murray Writing Award was presented for the 
first time to an outstanding seventh grade author, and 
students at Grade 8 competed in the essay contest spon- 
sored by the Chelmsford Emblem Club. Finally, 200 ex- 
cited sixth graders were able to see "A Christmas 
Carol" at Merrimack Repertory Theater due to a grant 
from the Chelmsford Cultural Council. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF MATHEMATICS (GRADES 6-8) 

The nature of Mathematics in the Middle School is 
one of diversification in curriculum and aptitude. It is 
the mission of the McCarthy Middle School Math 
Department to assist each student in achieving their in- 
dividual potential within one of the five levels offered, 
including accelerated programs in Algebra and 
Geometry. With the emphasis on problem solving, we 
have successfully introduced several math competition 
programs to challenge the average and above average 
students and we incorporate the use of hands-on math 
manipulatives including calculators and computers for 
the below average and remedial students. Approximate- 
ly 700 students continue to compete in the Continen- 
tal Math League and New England Math League 
Contests. 

Some new initiatives undertaken this year include the 
Math Counts National Competition Program and a pilot 
program for Pre- Algebra in grade eight. Our teachers, 
in addition to teaching regular classes, are actively con- 
tinuing their education in the areas of new programs, 



80 



mainstreaming and updating curriculum through the 
successful In-Service Workshop programs. Teachers also 
attended various conferences including the National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional 
Conference. 

The success of our program is evident in the ac- 
complishments of several students who scored perfect 
scores and received recognition for their participation 
in Continental Math League. Our results in National 
testing reinforces our belief that our goals are achievable 
and our methods our productive. 

This year the Robert McCullough Mathematics 
Trophy was awarded to Michael Phillips. 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Massachusetts' Chapter 766 and the Federal Govern- 
ment's Public Law 94-142, the Education of Handicap- 
ped Children Act, were enacted to assure that all han- 
dicapped children have a free and appropriate educa- 
tion to be provided by the local community. 

The Special Education Department in Chelmsford is 
responsible for providing effective programs and ser- 
vices for children, ages three through twenty-one, who 
are found to have special needs. 

Part of this responsibility is to assure that each han- 
dicapped student receives an education designed to 
meet his or her unique learning needs and to receive 
the services in the least restrictive environment. 

As of December 1, 1991 the Special Education Depart- 
ment had 888 students registered to receive special 
education services, which represents 17.1 percent of 
Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

A staff of seventy-one special education personnel 
develop and implement the individualized educational 
plans for these students. For those students with severe 
learning and/or emotional needs. Chelmsford provides 
for placement in private day or residential schools as 
approved by the State Department of Education. 

Chelmsford has received a supplemental grant from 
the Massachusetts Department of Education to pursue 
the issue of integrating Special Needs Students into the 
mainstream of regular education. A Regular Education 
Initiative Task Force of regular and special educators 
has been formed to determine need and recommend 
activities for integration. 



For the 1991-1992 school year, the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department has a budget of $3,705,595. of 
which $308,365. is provided through grants by the 
federal government. 

The Special Education Department will continue its 
quest to provide effective and cost efficient programs 
and services for the children we serve. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

During 1991. the Office of Community Education 
continued to offer self-supporting programs to both 
students and adults. Three semesters of Adult Educa- 
tion which include Northeastern and Middlesex college 
courses, school age child care, and summer programs 
continue to be popular with both our residents and 
members of the Greater Chelmsford Community. 

Our focus of growth has been on after school pro- 
grams for our students. Working with the middle school 
health education staff we certified approximately 200 
eighth grade students in C.P.R. We have also begun a 
new program. Above and Beyond in Chelmsford 
Schools (ABC's), which has already given 600 elemen- 
tary students after school enrichment experiences in our 
elementary buildings. 

We look forward to working with our residents dur- 
ing 1992 to offer quality programs. Please look for the 
Community Education brochure which is mailed to all 
residents during August, December and March. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

Since 1981, when the School Department started its 
own in-house computerization effort, all major school 
business related applications have been automated on 
our computer systems. These systems include a DEC 
11/44, VAX 750, and various microcomputers. In-house 
staff now maintain all data bases on students, accoun- 
ting, personnel, census, scheduling, attendance, report 
cards and a plethora of other applications. 

Many of the computer systems which are used in these 
business applications are nearing the 10 year mark. The 
hardware and software is approaching the end of its cost 
effective life. Older computer technologies are more ex- 
pensive to maintain and do not take advantage of the 
ability to reduce our operating costs with newer elec- 
tronic technology. Above all, the development of soft- 
ware and information systems must be focused on max- 



81 



imizing the value and utility of information while 
minimizing the cost and effort to the user. 

With these objectives in mind , the schools and town 
offices hope to implement LAN's (Local Area Net- 
works) to include the whole range of distributed and 
network computing. 

Other town departments serviced in some way by the 
School Computer Services Department include: Town 
Clerk, Council on Aging, Town Accountant, Town Can- 
didates for Office, Town Library, Selectmen's School 
Warrant Report, Community Education, PTA, Booster 
Club, Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational School, 
Police Department, Commission on Handicapped, 
Sewer Commission and Planning Board. 



IN CONCLUSION: 

Sincere thanks once again are extended to the town 
officials and boards, to the school staff, school 
volunteers, to the School Improvement Councils and 
to the parents and citizens for their assistance during 
this past year. 

The School Committee wishes to extend its deep ap- 
preciation to the following staff members for their years 
of loyal and meritorious service and who have retired 
this past year: 



Geraldine Anderson 

Lennea Barger 

Pauline Clermont 
Joseph Demers 
Mildred Hehir 
Kenneth Howard 
Florence Kyriazos 
Mildred Larock 

Evelyn Loose 
Anne Newcomb 
Mary Ellen Normandin 

Barbara Nowacki 
Donald Parkhurst 
Edward Quinn 
Marjorie Semple 



-Instructional Educ. Support Personnel, 

Parker Schoool 
-Educational Support Personnel 

Parker School 
-Food Service, High School 
-Maintenance Employee, System wide 
-Guidance Counselor, High School 
-Custodian, Parker School 
-Teacher, Parker School 
-Educational Support Personnel, 

Westlands School 
-Teacher, Harrington School 
-Secretary, High School 
-Director of Elementary Education, 

Systemwide 
-Teacher, South Row School 
-Teacher, High School 
-Dean, High School 
-Teacher, South Row School 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited 
by the New England Association of Schools and Col- 
leges, Inc. and provides its students with on-the-job 
training, saleable skills, a co-op program, a high school 
diploma, a trade certificate, an opportunity for further 
education at a college of their choice and job placement. 

Over the past decade, the record of employment for 
our graduates has averaged more than 90%. Each year, 
qualified seniors may elect to take advantage of our Co- 
op Training Program which allows senior students to 
work in industry during their shop weeks and receive 
valuable training in their chosen fields as well as a 
salary. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba 
Technical High School: 

Technical Programs 



Auto Body 

Automotive 

Carpentry 

Culinary Arts and Baking 

Data Processing 

Drafting 

Electrical 

Electronics 



Horticulture/Landscaping 
Machine 
Medical Occupations 
Metal Fabrication 
Painting and Decorating 
Plumbing and Heating 
Printing 
Building & Grounds 
(Special Education) 
New Program offered this year— Office Technology 

Academic Programs 

English Geometry 

Social Studies Trigonometry 

U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 

Consumer Education Biology 

General Mathematics Physics 

Algebra Chemistry 

How to Start Your Own Business 

In addition to the technical and academic programs, 
a full Inter-Scholastic Athletic Program is offered to the 
students. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult Educa- 
tion Program is open to anyone of high school age or 
over. Residents from all communities are welcome to 
participate in the many diversified courses which are 
offered during both the fall and spring semesters. This 
year 448 students enrolled in our Adult Education Pro- 
gram during the fall and winter semesters. 

ADULT DAY CLASSES 

This year, to accommodate district citizens who are 
unemployed or under employed, the Nashoba Tech has 
offered to accept adults into some of the technical pro- 



82 



grams where seats are available. This program helps 
unemployed or underemployed attain the skills need- 
ed to find a new position or better qualified in their pre- 
sent positions, thereby offering the underemployed a 
chance at promotions. 



ADMINISTRATION 



Bernholdt Nystrom 
David McLaughlin 



Superintendent-Director 
Asst. Director/Principal 







SUPERVISION 


NASHOBA VALLEY 






TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 


Victor Kiloski Academic Coordinator 






Paul Royte Guidance Director 


Serving the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, 


Paula Page Special Education Coordinator 


Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and Westford. 








BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 


DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMIT 








Ralph Dumas Accounting Manager 


Howard Burns, Chairman 


Pepperell 




Irene Machemer, Vice Chairman 


Townsend 


Nashoba Valley Technical High School's enrollment, 


Charlotte Scott, Secretary 


Westford 


as of October 1, 1991, is as follows: 


Thomas Carey 


Chelmsford 




Robert Union 


Westford 


Chelmsford 110 


Ellen Hargraves 


Groton 


Groton 41 


John Donohoe 


Chelmsford 


Littleon 33 


Stratos Dukakis 


Chelmsford 


Pepperell 87 


Augustine Kish 


Littleton 


Shirley 47 


Karen Johnson 


Shirley 


Townsend 51 


Joan O'Brien 


Westford 


Westford 71 


Jerilyn Bozicas 


Pepperell 


Tuitioned 66 
Total 506 


ALTERNATES 






Harvey Atkins, Jr. 


Littleton 




Stephen Dunbar 


Townsend 




Kevin Finnegan 


Westford 




L. Peter Noddin 


Shirley 




Jordan Waugh 


Groton 




Ronald Wetmore 


Chelmsford 




Alfred Buckley 


Pepperell 





83 



REPORT OF THE SEWER COMMISSION 





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— T 



(Front) Robert Joyce & John Emerson, Jr.; (Rear) Richard Day, George Abely, & Jeffrey Br em 



In 1991, construction efforts shifted to residential 
neighborhoods in South Chelmsford. Since the comple- 
tion of trunk interceptor sewers and main pumping sta- 
tions in 1989, the Commission has concentrated its ef- 
forts on extending lateral sewers to those residential 
areas identified by the wastewater facilities plan as hav- 
ing the greatest need for municipal sewers. 

Construction was completed in the Kensington Drive 
area and the Golden Cove Road area, two 
neighborhoods within the Aquifer Protection District. 
Construction was intense in the Old Stage area, Farms 
II area, the Domenic Drive area, and in other small 
residential sections of North Chelmsford, all areas with 
major septic system and soil problems. These projects 
are funded by 50% and 70% state grants. 

The other major sewer construction project in 1991 
encompassed a private sewer extension of the public 
sewer on Littleton Road. This project, designed and 
constructed entirely with private monies, was com- 
pleted in late 1991, except for final overlay pavement. 



The state has still, as yet, not finalized its plans to 
replace the current grant programs with a new revolv- 
ing loan program. The Commission is carefully review- 
ing all components of this program. In 1991, the Com- 
mission testified at the State House in support of 
wastewater funding programs. We remain committed 
to the maximization of all potentially available state and 
federal financial assistance. 

Our efforts now concentrate on extending lateral 
sewers to those residential areas identified by the 
wastewater facilities plan as having the greatest need 
for municipal sewers. The future areas to be serviced 
include: 

—Farms I Area 
—Warren/Hall/Brian Area 
— Westlands A & Westlands B 
—North Road Area 
— Westford Street Area 
—Crystal Lake Area 
—East Chelmsford; and 
—Hart Pond 



84 



As part of the phased program approved by voters in 
1989, the future areas to be sewered include 
neighborhoods with failing septic systems, septic 
systems which cannot be repaired, poor soils, high 
groundwater, and those within the drinking water 
aquifer. 

To date, 3,295 homes and businesses have been pro- 
vided with municipal sewer service. This represents 29% 
of the entire town. There still are 3,507 homes schedul- 
ed to be serviced, representing an additional 31% of 
town. When complete, the project will provide service 
to 6,802 homes and businesses, representing 60% of the 
town. 



Accepted 



Under 



For Use Construction 



Gravity Sewers (in Ft.) 

8-inch 

10-inch 

12pinch 

15-inch 

18-inch 

24-inch 

27-inch 

Total 

Force Mains 

Custom (Large) Pump Stations . 
Package (Small) Pump Stations . 



125,160 


72,632 


19,293 


3,437 


14,710 


10,305 


7,746 


- 


1,763 


- 


6,414 


- 


2,400 


- 



177,486 



22,720 



86,374 



12,280 



Unquestionably the best news regarding the sewer 
project to date has been the fact that the entire pro- 
ject, in excess of $38,000,000 of construction, has re- 
mained within budget. 

While we recognize we've been fortunate, we also feel 
strongly that our management practices and cost con- 
trol programs have contributed to our success. We also 
are experiencing first hand the cost advantages of con- 
structing at a time when the bid climate of the construc- 
tion industry is extremely competitive. 

The Commission would like to acknowledge our sup- 
port staff, Evelyn Newman, Jacqueline Sheehy and Gail 
Loiselle, for their hard work and meritorious service. 
Their multifaceted duties are shared by the Sewer Divi- 
sion of the Department of Public Works, and they are 
the individuals who interface with the public on a dai- 
ly basis. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Robert P. Joyce, Vice Chairman 

Richard J. Day, Clerk 

Jeffrey A. Brem 

George Abely 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

TOWN MANAGER 

Bernard F. Lynch 
Appointed 9-11-89 

TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 

TOWN TREASURER 

James R. Doukszewicz 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Bernard Myler 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips 

Ruth K. Delaney (elec.) 

Bruce Symmes 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

James Pearson, Director 

Highway Division 

John E. Long, Superintendent 

Bob Lloyd, Foreman 

Roy Costa, Foreman 

Engineering Division 

James Pearson, Town Engineer 

Recreation Commission 

Lorraine Murphy, Clerk 

Public Buildings Division 

Robert Deletetsky, Superintendent 

Parks Division 

Ed Jamros 

Sewer Division 

James Casparro, Superintendent 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appointed by Moderator 
Dwight M. Hawyard, Chairman 12/93 

Cheryl Boss 11/93 

Edward Marshall 10/92 

John E. Morrison (replaced Graham) 11/93 

Myra Silver 1/92 

George Simonian 1/92 

Brian R. Sullivan 9/92 

Ann Graham (resigned) 
Susan Olsen, Clerk 

FIRE CHIEF 

Robert L. Hughes 

Dep. Chief: James Sousa 

Dep. Chief: Charles Galloway 

POLICE CHIEF 

Raymond McKeon 
Dep. Chief: James Greska 



85 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET-ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUP 

JUNE 30, 1991 



ASSETS: 
CASH 



GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 



GENERAL 



$1,266,113 



SPECIAL 
REVENUE 



CAPITAL 
PROJECTS 



FIDUCIARY 
FUND TYPES 

TRUST & 
AGENCY 



ACCOUNT 

GROUP 

GENERAL 

LONG TERM 

OBLIGATIONS 



TOTALS 

(MEMORANDUM 

ONLY) 

JUNE 30, 

1991 



$1,529,990 



$4,558,749 



$1,026,874 



S 



$8,381,726 



INVESTMENTS 

INVESTMENT IN DEFERRED 
COMPENSATION PLAN 



822.293 
1.339.386 



822.293 
1,339.386 



PROPERTY TAXES RECEIVABLE: 



CURRENT YEAR 


2.475,136 


PRIOR YEARS 


173.379 


OTHER ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE: 




MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 


205.539 


TAX LIENS 


604,617 


DEPARTMENTAL 


8.550 


INTERGOVERNMENTAL 


- 



73,534 



209.968 



1.487.757 



2,475.136 
173.379 



205.539 

604.617 

82,084 

1.697,725 



OTHER ASSETES 



30.412 



30.412 



AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR 
RETIREMENT OF LONG TERM 
OBLIGATIONS 

TOTAL ASSETS 

LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 

PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 

OTHER LIABILITIES 

DEFERRED COMPENSATION PAYABLE 

POLICE DETAILS AGENCY 

DEFERRED REVENUE 

BONDS AND NOTES PAYABLE 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



$4,763,746 



$ 326.977 

414.104 

48.122 



3,057,487 



3,846,690 



26,767,610 



$1,739,958 



$6,046,506 



$3,262,087 



$26,767,610 



$ 14,810 



209,968 



224,778 



$ 154,498 



$ - 



1.339,386 
(69,986) 
73,534 



2,023,549 



26,767,610 



2,178,047 



1,342,934 



26,767,610 



26,767,610 



$42,579,907 



$ 496,285 

414,104 

48,122 

1,339,386 

(69,986) 

3,340,989 

28,791,159 



34.360,059 



FUND EQUITY: 
FUND BALANCES: 
RESERVED: 
ENCUMBRANCES 
ENDOWMENTS 
UNRESERVED: 
DESIGNATED (NOTE 9) 
UNDESIGNATED (NOTE 8) 

TOTAL FUND EQUITY 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND EQUITY 



672.559 


- 


- 


- 


- 


672,559 


- 


- 


- 


553,198 


- 


553,198 


755 


1,515,180 


3,868,459 


1,365,955 


_ 


6,750,349 


243,742 


- 


- 


- 


- 


243,742 


917.056 


1,515.180 


3,868,459 


1,919,153 


- 


8,219,848 


$4,763,746 


$1,739,958 


$6,046,506 


$3,262,087 


$26,767,610 


$42,579,907 





The accompanying notes are an integral part of these general purpose financial statements 



86 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES 

IN FUND BALANCES 
ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1991 



REVENUES: 
PROPERTY TAXES 
INTERGOVERNMENTAL-STATE 
INTERGOVERNMENTAL-FEDERAL 
MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 
INVESTMENT INCOME 
SEWER 
DEPARTMENTAL 

TOTAL REVENUES 

EXPENDITURES: 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
PUBLIC SAFETY 
EDUCATION 
PUBLIC WORKS 
CEMETERY 
HUMAN SERVICES 
CULTURE & RECREATION 
DEBT & INTEREST 
STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES 
OVER EXPENDITURES 











FIDUCIARY 




GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 




FUND TYPES 


TOTALS 




SPECIAL 




CAPITAL 


EXPENDABLE 


(MEMORANDUM 


GENERAL 


REVENUE 




PROJECTS 


TRUST 


ONLY) 


$29,593,542 


$ 


$ 




$ 


S29.593.542 


8.374,490 


180.273 




891,137 


- 


9.445,900 


- 


562.814 




143,292 


- 


706,106 


2,031,680 


- 




- 


- 


2,031,680 


412,108 


3.137 




1,372 


78.604 


495,221 


- 


513,944 




7,718 


- 


521,662 


2,941.147 


1.905.398 




- 


628,933 


5,475,478 


43.352.967 


3.165.566 




1.043.519 


707.537 


48.269,589 


4,780.882 


35.694 




185,254 


1.195.752 


6.197.582 


5,868,443 


- 




- 


1.703 


5,870.146 


22,539,066 


2,304.800 




174.865 


- 


25,018.731 


3.479,995 


166,181 




5,867,487 


- 


9,513,663 


240,037 


- 




- 


- 


240.037 


593,817 


47,004 




- 


- 


640,821 


687,717 


60,061 




31,840 


373 


779,991 


5,637,686 


- 




- 


- 


5,637,686 


181,328 


- 




- 


- 


181,328 


44.008.971 


2.613.740 




6,259.446 


1.197,828 


54.079.985 



(656.0041 



551.826 



(5.215,927) 



1490,291) 



(5.810,396) 



OTHER FINANCING RESOURCES (USES) 
BOND PROCEEDS 

OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 813,250 

OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT (729,987) 

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 83,263 



(557,313) 



(557,313) 



3,787,610 


- 


3,787,610 


34,050 


746,963 


1,594,263 


- 


(265.000) 


(1,552,300) 



3,821,660 



481.963 



3,829,573 



EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES AND 
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES OVER 
EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 



1572,741) 



(5,487) 



(1,394,267) 



(8,328) 



(1,980,823) 



FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 
FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR 



1,489,797 


1,520,667 


5.262.726 


1,374,283 


9,647,473 


$917,056 


$1,515,180 


$3,868,459 


$1,365,955 


$7,666,650 



The accompanying notes are an integral part of these general purpose financial statements 



87 



DEPARTMENT OF ELDER AFFAIRS 

Despite the recession with some depression, our agen- 
cy fortunately continued to grow, to innovate and to 
meet the challenges of the 90 's. 

HIGHLIGHTS 

Nutrition: Starting this past September the Con- 
gregate Lunch and our Meals on Wheels Program 
operated directly out of the Senior Center. During the 
first four months, 9,763 lunches were served and 6.018 
meals were delivered to home-bound elders. The cost 
for a meal is one dollar ($1) and it's nutritiously balanc- 
ed, exceptionally tasty, and there is plenty of good 
sociability. 

Intergenerational Partnerships: This was an ex- 
cellent year for cooperation and development between 
the Council on Aging <COA> and School Department. 

• Chelmsford senior citizens raised 53,500 for 
CHS "'Athletic and Activity Fund.** 

• Students of the McCarthy Middle School raised 
$3,200 for the Meals on Wheels Program by 
holding a walk-a-thon. 

• High School students of the Thomas Jefferson 
Forum working with the CPO and area nursing 
homes held "Senior Day."* a "Senior Prom." 
and the special "Senior Olympics." 

• Chelmsford hosted an Intergenerational Con- 
ference for the entire Merrimack Valley which 
drew school administrators, municipal officials 
and members of the aging network. 

Each week. . .over 1 ,200 people use the Senior Center 
and take advantage of its programs and services. 

• fifty elderly shut-ins are visited by our Friendly 
Visitors, Senior Aides and Outreach Worker 

• eighty seniors are transported or 125 trips to 
day care centers, hospitals, doctors' offices and 
shopping 

• support groups are offered for widows, stroke 
victims and family members who have loved 
ones afflicted with Alzheimers Disease 

Special thanks to: The many (approx. 150) volunteers 
who contribute so significantly to the Senior Center's 
operation 

• The Friends of the Senior Center who so 
generously gave $113,882 for building im- 
provements, staffing and operational expenses. 

• The members of the Council on Aging (CO A) 
who gave their time, ideas and love to make it 
all possible. 

Director of Elder Affairs 

Marty Walsh 

COA Members 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The economy again in Fiscal 1991 has taken its toll 
on the Fire Department and public safety in general. 
As of June 30th the Fire Department, because of budget 
restraints and a defeated override attempt, had to layoff 
an additional six <6> members. This shortage of person- 
nel forced the closing of our West Chelmsford Fire Sta- 
tion. The total members laid off now stands at ten ' 10) . 
This has greatly hampered our response time and our 
mission to protect the life and property of the people 
town wide. 

We have had two retirements this fiscal year. Jack 
Hadley, a thirty-two (32) year veteran has retired and 
David Gelineau, a member for fourteen < 14) years has 
retired on a job related disability. I would like to thank 
them for their years of dedicated service to the town. 

Our mission to protect the life and property of the 
townspeople under the restraints of this present 
economy remains our highest priority. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen, the 
Town Manager and all other officials for their excellent 
cooperation of the Fire Department this past year. I 
would sincerely like to thank the members of the 
Chelmsford Fire Department, the office staff and our 
mechanics for continuing to uphold the high standards 
of service to the townspeople under the tough restraints 
we are facing. 

Respectfully submitted 



Robert L. Hughes 
Fire Chief 



Robert Clough, Chair 
Mary Conti, Secretary 
Charles Pechulis 
Candice Gregorian 
Michael McCall 



Wilbur Davis, Vice Chair 

Gene Raby 

Franchon Larson 

Jean Mark 

Lois Manty 



88 



Totals 



70 



CHELMSFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS-1991 



B 



M 



MA 



O 



57 



771 



18 



706 



153 



1,128 



FIRE DEPARTMENT CODES 

A— Auto Fire B— Building Fire M— Medical Assistance 



76 



Monthly 
Calls 



January 


5 


5 


67 


1 


49 


3 


87 


4 


221 


February 


6 


19 


47 





41 


2 


83 


2 


191 


March 


4 


3 


54 





64 


7 


122 


6 


260 


April 


8 


1 


68 


4 


63 


43 


128 


10 


325 


May 


4 


7 


72 


3 


58 


13 


145 


4 


306 


June 


6 


7 


63 


2 


69 


12 


119 


10 


288 


July 


6 


5 


70 


2 


66 


19 


93 


5 


266 


August 


6 


8 


77 


1 


92 


14 


79 


17 


294 


September 


5 


2 


61 





51 


14 


81 


12 


226 


October 


9 


2 


60 


1 


48 


6 


69 


5 


200 


November 


5 


4 


67 





42 


14 


50 





182 


December 


6 


3 


65 


4 


63 


6 


72 


1 


220 



2,979 



I— Investigation 0— Outside Fire S— Service Call F— False Alarm 



NAME 

Adley, Walter 
Anderson, Arthur 
Bennett, Robert 
Boermeester, J. 
Burke, W. Michael 
Cady, William 
Campbell, David 
Campbell, William 
Carroll, John 
Cincevich, Anthony 
Clancy, David 
Clarke, Kevin 
Conlin, Francis J. 
Conlin, F. Mark 
Curran, James 
Curran, Michael F. 
Curran, William 
Cutter, James 
Dalton, William F. 
DePalma, John 
Desaulnier, Martha A. 
Donovan, Bruce 
Drew, Donald 
Durkin, James 
Flaherty, James 
Foster, Jesse 
Frobese, Ernest 
Galloway, Charles 
Gelineau, David 
Goode, Terrance 
Grenon, Richard 
Griffin, Anna 
Hadley, David 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 
POSITION 



Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Principal Clerk 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Deputy 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Junior Clerk 

Firefighter 



Hadley, Jack 
Hadley, William 
Hayes, Paul D. 
Henderson, Paul 
Hughes, Robert L. 
Jamer, William 
Johnson, Peter 
Keeley, James 
Keohane, Dennis 
Keohane, William 
Kydd, Raymond 
Magiera, Emil 
Martin, Leo 
McTeague, Michael 
Merrill, Leslie 
Miller, Richard 
Nolet, Edward 
O'Neil, Richard 
Reid, Daniel 
Reid, James 
Reid, John 
Ridlon, Michael 
Rivard, Arthur 
Robinson, John 
Schramm, Charles 
Sousa, James 
Spinazzola, Joseph 
Spinney, James 
Stanton, Brian 
Ubele, John D. 
Vaccaro, Anthony 
Vargeletis, Dennis 
Wetherbee, Peter 



Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Chief 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Mechanic 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Deputy 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Mechanic 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 



89 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A., Chairman 
Ruth K. Delaney, M.A.A. Richard Tevlin (Left July mv 
Bruce A. Symmes, CM. A., R.M.A., M.A.A. , (started 

August 1991) 

ASSISTANT TO THE ASSESSORS 

Nancy L. Maher 



PRINCIPAL CLERKS 

Marie Ronan 
Elaine McBride 



SENIOR CLERK 

Elaine Myers 



Fiscal Year 1991 was an exceptionally busy year for 
the office. The office was preparing and checking work 
for the recertification of values for Fiscal Year 1992. 
Values were dropping, and even though values will go 
down taxes will increase. 

Abatement requests, especially from the commercial 
and industrial properties increased. 

Assessor Richard Tevlin left after three years of ser- 
vice to pursue a career in Las Vegas. 

The office is exceptionally fortunate' to have had ap- 
pointed as an Assessor Bruce Symmes. Bruce comes 
highly qualified, and we look forward to a long 
association. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane Phillips, M.A.A. 

Ruth Delaney, M.A.A. 

Bruce A. Symmes, CM. A., R.M.A., M.A.A. 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR BRANCH 

Dept. Members: 

James R. Doukszewicz, Finance Director 

Carol R. Lambert, Asst. Treasurer 

Margaret M. Mullen, Dept. Asst. to Tax Collector 

Donna M. Rogers, Payroll Co-Ordinator 

Bettie A. Osborne, Accts. Payable/Receivable Clerk 

Judith A. Olsson, Part-time, Legal Clerk 

Joan L. Garland, Data Processing Clerk 

Dept. Notes: 

The retirement of Lorraine D. Parkhurst occurred this 
year, leaving the office with the loss of an excellent 
worker. Donna Rogers was promoted to her position, 
with Joan Garland returning to the office from the Plan- 
ning Board to fill in Donna's vacant position. 

Tax-title work took up a lot of time this year, with 
the fruits being seen in receipts late in the year as the 
Mill Complex got current as did most of our commer- 
cial property delinquents. Some bankruptcies were settl- 
ed, as were F.D.I.C. liquidation matters, bringing more 
revenue into the Treasury. Current years tax bills are 
ahead of last year's collections rate by some 2.1%. 

We did place tax liens against 94 properties in 1991, 
and plan to place another 87 liens in early 1992. This 
process, though difficult on some people, is a necessary 
step on my part as a Tax Collector to ensure that tax 
dollars badly needed to support services are brought in- 
to the Town coffers as expeditiously as possible. 

Growth in the tax base was achieved permanently as 
an education override was successful at the annual 
Town election for nearly one million dollars. New pro- 
perties are coming on board the tax rolls at a greater 
rate than last year as well. 

Office work loads have become an insurmountable 
task, however. This is one of the reasons that prompted 
my early retirement from my job, effective April, 1992. 
We have added trash fee collections, recycling fee col- 
lections, medical insurance payments from retired 
employees, and quarterly collections on property tax 
receipts to our work loads in just the past two years, 
with no added staff hours. I will recommend to the 
Manager that the office return to a shorter week in 
hours open to the public, so that required tasks can be 
completed without constant telephone or customer 
interruption. 



Respectfully submitted, 
James R. Doukszewicz 



90 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1991. 

At the present time, the department is made up of 
46 permanent officers. 

Chief of Police 

Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief 

James C. Greska 



Patrolmen 



Armand J. Caron 



Captains 

Phillip N. Molleur 
Sergeants 



John J. Mack 



Steven Burns James F. Murphy 

Lance Cunningham John O. Walsh 

Raymond G. McCusker 

Department Criminal Prosecutor 
Lowell District Court 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

Criminal Bureau 
Sergeant 

William R. McAllister 

Inspectors 

James T. Finnegan Peter C. McGeown 

Brian F. Mullen Timothy F. O'Connor 

Eugene W. Walsh 

Drug/ Alcohol Control Unit 
Sergeant 

Francis X. Roark 



Jared S. Finnegan 



Inspectors 



Roland E. Linstad 



Community Services & Safety Officer 

Patrick W. Daley 

Crime Prevention Officer 

Joseph R. Gamache 



Richard A. Adams 
Paul E. Cooper 
Alan Cote 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Gail Hunter 
Francis P. Kelly 
Martin Krikorian 
Russell H. Linstad 
John C. McGeown 
Debra Metcalf 



Faith Allen 
Jo Cobleigh 
Barbara Ducharme 
Mary Jo Fitton 



Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
John E. Redican 
Paul Richardson 
Chandler J. Robinson 
E. Michael Rooney 
Michael M. Stott 
William S. Strobel 
Francis Teehan 
Robert Trudel 
Scott Ubele 
William R. Walsh 
Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 



Matrons 



Donna Fox 
Cynthia Katsikas 
Dawn O'Donnell 
Carol Ann Tabor 



Principal Clerks 

Marie K. DiRocco Mary Jane Grant 

Jo- Ann E. Molleur 

Jr. Clerk 

Donna Fox 

Civilian Dispatchers 

Barbara Ducharme Frederick Flynn 

Milton H. Kinney Frank Lane 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 

1990 1991 

Photocopying Machine $3,672.70 $4,025.00 

Firearms Permit 2,299.00 2,164.00 

Bicycle Registrations 5.50 9.00 

Firearms Identification Cards 382.00 356.00 

Court Fines 189,749.50 132,362.50 

Photographs 556.00 404.00 

Police Details-Service Charge 38,388.46 59,904.00 

False Alarms 5,025.00 7,425.00 

Parking Fines 13,399.00 7,920.00 

Restitution 990.00 910.00 

Total Receipts returned to the Town . $254,467. 16 $215,479.50 

ARRESTS 

1990 1991 

Crimes Against Persons 52 74 

Crimes Against Property 196 174 

Crimes Against Public Order 235 206 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

1990 1991 

Fines 77 45 

Placed on Probation 20 33 

Suspended Sentence/Placed on File 16 20 

Placed on File 10 7 

Not Guilty Finding 6 3 

Dismissed With Probable Cause 9 25 

Court Costs & Continued Without 

A Finding 27 3 



91 



Committed to Youth Services Board 4 

Committed to M.C.I. Cedar Junction 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 1 2 

Committed to House of Correction, Billerica . .25 37 

Turned Over to Other Courts/P.D. 's 122 161 

Cases Pending & Continued in Court 163 97 

Placed in Alcohol Safety Program (ASAP) 23 27 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1990 1991 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 15,451 20,724 

Summons Served 653 720 

Licenses Suspended/Revoked 385 1,214 

Accidents Reported 1,218 1,183 

Fatal Accidents 3 4 

Personal Injury Accidents 239 459 

Mileage on Cruisers 503,518 448,892 

Station Lockups 483 454 

Citations Issued 3,221 2,039 

Parking Violations 636 310 

Doors/Windows Found Open 82 139 

Protective Custody 68 79 

Restraining Orders Served 84 98 

False Alarms Responded to by Cruisers 942 1,111 

RETIREMENTS 

Officer James Midgley retired from the Police Depart- 
ment this past February following 30 years of service 
to the town. 

Karen Leonard retired following 5 years of service 
with the Police Department as Principal Cleric/Chief's 
Secretary. Karen got married and relocated to New York 
City. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT LAYOFFS 

As a result of continuing additional budget cutbacks, 
the Police Department was forced to lay off Officer 
Robert Villare, a veteran of 3 years' service with the 
department. 

The efforts of this department served to generate total 
receipts of $215,479.50 which reverted back to the 
general fund of the town. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to 
the Town Manager, Board of Selectmen and all town 
officials, departments, and committees for the excellent 
cooperation given to the Police Department and also 
congratulate both sworn and non-sworn personnel of 
this department for once again, maintaining their high 
performance standards. 

Chief Raymond P. McKeon 

AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

The Auxiliary Police Unit celebrated 35 years of ser- 
vice to the Town of Chelmsford this past year. The 
dedicated townspeople, who were members over the 
years and gave so much of their time, are directly 
responsible for the Auxiliary Unit's success, and I thank 



them. This last year all Auxiliary members have been 
recertified in CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation) 
First Aid and Firearms. In addition to this training, of- 
ficers receive monthly training on police procedures. 

The Auxiliary Police Unit assisted the town at 
numerous events this past year such as: The John Car- 
son Road Race, Memorial Day Parade, Flag Day 
Ceremonies, Desert Storm Celebrations, Chelmsford 
High School Graduation Exercises, July 3rd Festivities, 
July 4th Parade, Vietnam Veteran's Day, Special School 
Security on Halloween and Thanksgiving Day. The 
Auxiliary Unit also assisted with traffic and pedestrian 
control at the First Annual "Holiday Prelude." This 
event was most successful and the community seemed 
to thoroughly enjoy it. 

In the month of August, the Auxiliary Police Unit was 
called into emergency action for Hurricane Bob. The 
members worked long hours. Some members putting 
in 12 to 16 hours per day over the two days the unit 
was activated. I was extremely proud of the Unit's per- 
formance during that difficult time. Throughout the 
year, the Auxiliary Officers also assisted the Regular Of- 
ficers at numerous accident scenes and assisted with the 
sewer construction traffic details. 

Operation House Check was in operation on 263 
nights. The statistics were: vacant house checks 3,156; 
school checks 9,205; town property checks 1,448 for a 
total of 13,809. The men and women of the Auxiliary 
Unit donated to the Town a total of 8,736 man hours 
performing their duties. The Auxiliary continues to 
sponsor the Explorer Scout Law Enforcement Post 370 
and we assist them with training and planning their ac- 
tivities. The scouts have been a great help to the Aux- 
iliary and the Town and I hope the interest in the post 
will continue. 

In these difficult financial times, it is extremely im- 
portant to have a volunteer group such as the Auxiliary 
Police Unit. It is my belief that without these dedicated 
townspeople, many of the aforementioned events would 
not have been able to be held. 

I would like to thank the members of the Auxiliary 
and their families for donating so much of their time 
to make Chelmsford a better place to live. I would like 
to thank the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager 
for their support, the Chief and Deputy Chief and all 
the Officers of the Police Department for their assistance 
and support over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 



92 



AUXILIARY ROSTER 

Director— Sgt. Raymond G. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 

AUXILIARY OFFICERS 



John Bell 
Charles Emerson 
Joseph Eriksen 
Eric Gordon 
Jacqueline Harris 
David Irvine 
David Leo 
Peter LoPilato 
Steven Manning 
Kim Martin 
Daniel McLarney 
Erik Merrill 
Robert Murphy 
John Oczkowski 



John Paton 
Bradford Poole 
Edward Quinn 
James Quinn 
Ralph Roscoe 
Kevin Ross 
Colin Spence 
Timothy Swissler 
Scott Tansino 
Michael Taplin 
William Vaughn 
Craig Walsh 
David Walsh 
Gary White 



Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and 
Mass. Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) con- 
ducted surveys of the various damages through the 
Town. FEMA has declared the Town of Chelmsford 
eligible for Federal Funds. 

The CEMA members meet the second Thursday of 
each month, preparing various reports for Federal and 
State Emergency Agencies. 

The Emergency Coordinator and members spent 
many volunteer hours this past year at Seminars of 
Natural Disasters, Radiology and Hazardous Materials. 

We wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Manager and all Town Department Heads and person- 
nel for the outstanding cooperation received during this 
most trying year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 

Emergency Coordinator 



OFFICE OF THE DOG OFFICER 

Report of the Dog Officer for 1991. 

Citizen complaints answered 928 

Dogs picked up and taken to pound 92 

Value of citation fines $325.00 

Funds turned into town for boarding and 

other fees collected $1,025.00 

Dead animals picked up from streets 205 

Stray dogs disposed of 55 

Dogs returned to owners 37 

Miles traveled 12,418 

Number of dogs licensed 2,899 



OFFICE OF 
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 



Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 

John Abbott George R. Dixon 

Ray Day Depty. Charles S. Galloway 

The Chelmsford Emergency Management Agency 
(Civil Defense) has been very active this past year, with 
a State of Emergency declared August 19, 1992 by 
Federal, State and Town Governments, due to Hur- 
ricane Bob. 

Many volunteer hours were spent by personnel at the 
Emergency Operating Center at Town Offices during 
the week long State of Emergency. 



93 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

This year the DPW (consisting of Engineering, 
Highway, Parks, Public Buildings and Sewer Division) 
performed a multitude of tasks and several special pro- 
jects as further described below. 

Because of the minimal manpower staffing levels all 
employees find themselves assisting in other job func- 
tions and even other DPW divisions in an effort to pro- 
vide the essential services or to prevent problems from 
becoming emergencies directly affecting the public. 
Hurricane Bob cleanup and reconstruction of a sewer 
pump station are two examples of DPW employees 
assisting in other areas for the good of the Town. 

I would like to thank each employee for the part they 
played in this year's progress. 



ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 
Town of Chelmford Department of Public Works 

DIRECTOR 

James E. Pearson, Town Engineer 



HIGHWAY DIV. 

J. Long, Supt. 
R. Costa, Foreman 
B. Loyd, Foreman 
M. Burns (Office) 
G. Beaulieu, Driver 
K. Burroughs, Laborer 
J. Cronin, Driver 
J. Crotty, Driver 
B. Dearborn, Driver 
L. Dukeshire, Laborer 
J. Ferreira, Mech. 
L. Ferreira, Operator 

D. Greenwood, Operator 
S. Harvey, Driver 

E. Howland, Driver 
R. Jenson, Mech. 

W. McLaughlin, Operator 
A. Newcomb, Operator 
R. Soucier, Operator 



SEWER DIV. 

J. Casparro, Insp. 

J. Witts, Mech. 

E. Newman, Dept. Ass't. 

J. Sheehy, Pr. Clerk 

G. Loiselle, Pt. Clerk 



PUBLIC BLDG. DIV. 

B. Deletetsky, Supt. P.T. 
P. Murtaugh, Hd. Cust. 
J. Johnson, Cust. 



PARKS DIV. 

E. Jamros 



ENGINEERING DIV. 

T. Ma, Asst. Tn. Eng. 



ENGINEERING DIVISION 



The Engineering Division assists the other DPW divi- 
sions as well as Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, 
Traffic and Safety Committee, Conservation Commis- 
sion, Planning Board and Assessors relative to engineer- 
ing concerns, such as drainage systems, road layouts, 
pavement maintenance, site plans, subdivisions, etc. 
This year much time was spent with the Highway Divi- 
sion due to the unfilled Highway Superintendent 
position. 



94 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

The maintenance of town streets was carried out in 
the usual manner. This includes paving, crack sealing, 
catch basin repair and rebuilding, pot hole repair, street 
and safety signs, line painting, etc. 

During the winter the Highway Division handled the 
sanding, snow plowing and snow removal. The winter 
of 1991 was a very mild one compared to the average 
winter season. Approximately 25 inches of snow fell 
compared to the normal 50 inches. 

STREETS RESURFACED: 



Chelmsford St. 

Dayton St. 
Hunt Rd. 

Garrison Rd. 

School St. 
Meadowbrook Rd. 

Old Westford Rd. 

Acton Rd. 

Crooked Spring Rd. 



(from Billerica Rd. to R.R. 

Tracks) 

(entire length) 

(from High St. to Garrison 

Rd. 

(from Littleton Rd. to Maple 

Rd.) 

(entire length) 

(from Crooked Spring Rd. to 

Main St.) 

(from Princess St. to 

Westford Town Line) 

(approx. 300'— near Bartlett 

St.) 

(from rear of Parker School 

to Meadwobrook Rd.) 



CRACKSEALING: 

Portions of the following streets were cracksealed: 



Middlesex St. 
Groton Rd. 
Main St. 

Crooked Spring Rd. 
Graniteville Rd. 

Sarah Lane 
Horseshoe Rd. 



Amble Rd. 

Blacksmith Rd. 

Chestnut Hill Rd. 

Old Westford Rd. 

Old Westford Rd. (Parking 

Lot— Fire Station) 

Meadowbrook Rd. 



Hurricane Bob hit the area late in August, bringing 
high winds and torrential rains. The storm caused 
power outages throughout much of the Town. Other 
damages included road washouts, collapsed head walls 
and clogged culverts. Roughly 350 trees were knocked 
over or severely damaged. The Highway Division per- 
sonnel displayed their dedication and endurance by 
staying on the job around the clock to keep roadways 
open to emergency vehicles and to miminize damages 
due to flooding. 

An underground fuel storage tank was removed from 
the highway yard on Richardson Road. The remaining 
storage tanks were pressure tested and found to be in 
good condition. 

Mr. John Long was appointed Highway Division 
Superintendent in October of this year. 



PARKS DIVISION 

The Parks division continued its fine work in main- 
taining the Town's "green areas." The Adopt- A-Park 
program was once again a success. Special thanks go 
to Adopt-a-Park volunteers: 

Dick Codling, Dick Burkinshaw, Keigh Schuster, 
Chelmsford Rotary, Valley Green Landscaping, 
Chelmsford Garden Club, Kevin Stott Landscaping, 
College Landscaping, David O'Brien, Dun-Rite 
Landscaping, Laughton Nurseries and 
Community Tree Co. 

Special projects completed this year by Ground- 
skeeper Ed Jamros, included reconstruction of old, 
unused metal and wood grandstands, repair of all park 
benches, and repair of tennis posts at Varney Field. The 
Groundskeeper also assists the Highway and Sewer 
Divisions in time of emergency, such as snowstorms, 
Hurricane Bob and pump station failures. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

The Public Buildings Division is responsible for main- 
taining the Town Offices, the Old Town Hall, and 
assists with the Police Station. The staff must also open 
and close the buildings daily and respond to alarms and 
other emergency situations. Fortunately Hurricane Bob 
resulted in very little damage to the buildings. 

Special projects completed this year include the in- 
stallation of additional automatic setback thermostats 
in the Town Offices and the refurbishing of the sign in 
front of the Town Offices. 

SEWER DIVISION 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation 
and maintenance of the sewerage system (collection and 
pumping). This also includes issuing permits, inspec- 
ting connections, keeping as-built record drawings, set- 
ting up each individual account, and billing the 
customers for this sewer usage. At the end of this year 
there were approximately 1850 units connected to the 
sewer system. The flow pumped to Lowell is approx- 
imately 500,000 gallons per day. Major reconstruction 
work was required at the Richardson Road Pump Sta- 
tion due to a pump failure. Through careful planning 
and cooperation of several departments the reconstruc- 
tion was accomplished without a major system 
interruption. 

Special thanks go to the Sewer Commission and all 
three Water Districts who lent their assistance and 
cooperation all year long. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James E. Pearson, P.E. 

Director of Public Works 



95 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members 

Robert Kydd, Chairman 
Gustave Fallgren, Vice Chairman 
Daniel Burke, Clerk 
Eileen Duffy 
Harold Organ, Jr. 



Ronald Pare 



Alternates 

Karen Wharton 



Leonard Richards 



Secretary 

Marjorie Hennessy 



Hearing Statistics: 

Variances 

Spec. Permits 

Mod. of Compr. Permit 

Total 



Total 

25 
16 

1 

42 



Granted 

19 
12 

J_ 

32 



Denied 

6 
3 



Withdrawn 



1 



ford Alpine Squares Dancing Club and all various town 
organizations who participated to make the celebration 
a huge success. 

We thank the efforts of the Police, Fire, Public Works 
& Parks Department and personnel for their assistance 
during the celebration. 

Many thanks to the many volunteers of the Chelms- 
ford Auxiliary Police and their Explorers Troop for their 
many volunteer hours. 

The committee in meeting in preparation for the An- 
nual 1992 Fourth of July Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, 
Chairman 



Showing the signs of the econony, the Board of Ap- 
peal had fewer hearings in 1991 than any other previous 
year in the last ten. I would like to welcome the new 
alternate, Leonard Richards, and hope he will enjoy the 
meetings. I would also like to thank the permanent 
members for their attendance and also the alternates 
who sat when requested. 

It has been a pleasure serving as Chairman of the 
Board and I appreciate the help of the Board of Select- 
men, Board of Health, Sign Advisory, Conservation 
Commission and Planning Board for their cooperation 
during 1991. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert L. Kydd, Chairman 
BOARD OF APPEALS 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Steve Chinetti James K. Gifford 

Ray Day Charles Marderosian 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 

The Celebrations Committee, this past year was very 
active, coordinating and preparing for the 1991 Annual 
Fourth of July Celebration. Special thanks to the 
Chelmsford Lodge of Elks, No. 2310 for their funding 
and organizing the 1991 Annual Parade honoring 
Chelmsford Service People who served in the Persian 
Gulf Conflict, the Chelmsford Lions Club for their fun- 
ding and planning the 1991 Annual Country Fair on the 
Common, Chelmsford Art Society for the Arts Festival 
at Town hall, Chelmsford Community Band, Chelms- 



Members 

James H. McBride, Chairman 
David J. McLachlan, Clerk 
Karen G. Flynn 
Dr. John Droescher 
Susan E. Carter 
W. Robert Greenwood 
Christopher Garrahan 
Marjorie Hennessy, Secretary 



Term Expires 

1992 
1992 
1992 
1993 
1993 
1994 
1994 



The Conservation Commission's primary purpose is 
to administer the General Wetlands By-law of the Town 
and the Wetlands Protection Act of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. These By-laws control activities deem- 
ed to have significant effect upon the Wetlands, which 
in turn influence public and private water supplies, 
flood control, water pollution, fisheries and wildlife. 

During 1991 the Commission brought the General 
Wetlands By-law into compliance and consistency with 
State regulations. However, in one important respect 
the Town's By-law is more restrictive than State regula- 
tions in its prohibition of building construction within 
50 feet of the Wetlands. 

The Commission meets regularly on the first and third 
Wednesday of each month as is needed. In 1991 nine 
Public Hearings were held in which seven Orders of 
Conditions were issued instructing the applicant on how 
to undertake work within 100 feet of Wetlands in order 
to minimize any possible negative effect on the 
Wetlands. One application was denied and one hear- 
ing has been continued as of this report writing. In ad- 
dition another 21 Public Hearings were held for Deter- 
mination of Applicability to the Wetlands By-laws. 



96 



Nineteen (19) negative determinations were issued in- 
dicating the work planned had no impact on the 
Wetlands; one positive determination was issued in- 
dicating the Wetlands By-laws would apply and one ap- 
plication was withdrawn. 

As the Town continues to grow and environmental 
issues take on greater importance in how they impact 
the quality of life in our Community, citizen involve- 
ment in advising the Commission when damage to the 
Wetlands starts to occur will assist the Commission in 
protecting the assets of the Wetlands. We also wish to 
thank those individuals who have worked with the 
Commission early in their development plans so that 
proper planning and execution of development can 
occur. 

After 1 1 years of dedicated service to the Conserva- 
tion Commission Charlie Galloway stepped down as a 
Commissioner. The Conservation Commission wishes 
to thank Charlie for his many contributions. 



Even though our budget was cut 70% and the State 
mandated one funding cycle, 21 grant proposals were 
either partially or fully funded. Applications ranged 
from an artist-in-residence program, a barbershop 
chorus and an International festival to the installation 
of a sound system for the Old Town Hall Cultural 
Center. Another facet of the Arts Lottery funding is 
P.A.S.S. (Performing Arts Students' Series). Initiated in 
Nov., 1986, this program provides funds for school- 
aged children (K-12) of the Town to attend performing 
arts events. The Council is also closely involved with 
the functioning of the Old Town Hall Cultural Center. 
Town-based organizations use the hall for special events 
or for regular rehearsals and meetings. The resignation 
of Bette Lee Gagnon was regretfully accepted. Member 
Jim Turcotte concluded 6 years on the Council. New 
members Deborah Sady and Jean McCaffery were 
welcomed. 

Accomplishments this year include: A workshop— 
"Supporting the Arts: A Challenge for the 1990's," 
Statewide convention and roundtable discussions and 
the installation of the sound system at the Old Town 
Hall. 



CHELMSFORD CULTURAL COUNCIL 



Chairperson 
Vice-Chairperson 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Administrator 



Chairperson 
Vice-Chairperson 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Members: Jan. 1-June, 1991 

Joyce D. McKenzie 
Bette Gagnon 
Sandra Stewich 
Jeffrey Brem 
James Turcotte 
Karen Leonard 
Margrit Mason 
Edie Copenhaver 
Pat Fitzpatrick 

Members: Sept., 1991 

Joyce D. McKenzie 
Pat Fitzgerald 
Margrit Mason 
Jeffrey Brem 
Sandra Stewich 
Karen Leonard 
Edie Copenhaver 
Deborah Sady 
Jean McCaffery 



Meetings: 

1st Monday of the Month 
Twice a month during Arts Lottery reviews 

The principal function of the Chelmsford Cultural 
Council is to administer funds allocated to the Town 
of Chelmsford by the Mass. Cultural Concil. Grant ap- 
plications are available to non-profit cultural organiza- 
tions for projects benefiting the Chelmsford 
community. 



Future projects include: A townwide Arts Day on Oct. 
3, a performing arts series at the Old Town Hall and 
the dedication of the sound system. 



CHELMSFORD COMMISSION ON 
HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS 

The Commission has actively pursued the accessibility 
of publicly-used buildings this year and this crucial task 
will be an on-going process. 

Our meetings are open to the public. They are held 
on the second Thursday of each month at 7:15 p.m. 

The Commission's seven members are: Paul Logan- 
Chairman, Ralph Hickey— Vice Chairman, Catherine 
Favreau— Secretary, Carol Miller— Treasurer, Alice 
Beauvais, Terry Eldridge and Mary St.Hilaire. 



97 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members: Robert P. LaPorte, Jr., Chairman 
Harold Davis - Vice Chairman 
Harold J. Linnerud 
Stephen Stowell 
Charles Buuck 

Aternate: Bruce Foucar 
Paul J. Canniff 

Clerk: Mary E. Caffelle 

Meetings: The first Monday of each month at the 1802 
Schoolhouse. Special meetings when and where 
required. 

During the past year the Historic District Commis- 
sion accepted 23 applications for Certificates of Ap- 
propriateness. Public hearings were scheduled for 9 of 
these, to permit public input. The remaining 14 were 
deemed to have an insubstantial effect on the District. 
For these, hearings were waived and abutters were 
notified by mail. 

These applications resulted in the issuance of 20 
Certificates of Appropriateness and 3 Certificates of 
Non- Applicability or Hardship. No applications were 
denied. 

The members of the Historic District Commission 
continue to work with property owners within the 
Historic District to protect and preserve the distinct 
character of the district. 



HOLIDAY DECORATING 
COMMITTEE 

Committee Members: 



Donna Johnson, Chairman 
Ellen Donovan, Treasurer 
Linda Emerson 
Bruce Foucar 
Jean Kydd 
Dawn Siphol 



Patricia Saber 

Carolee Hill 

Carrie Steiman 

Jacqueline Wunschel 

Carrie Bacon 

Dennis Ready 

Selectman Liaison 



The Chelmsford Holiday Decorating Committee held 
its traditional Tree Lighting Ceremony on Sunday, 
December 8, 1991. This year the event was expanded 
to include the first Holiday Prelude in Chelmsford 
Center from 4-5:30 p.m. with the culmination being the 
tree lighting on the Common at 5:30. 

The program highlighted "Santa" arriving by sleigh 
and escorted by Ms. Chelmsford, Renae Massota, 
through the Business District to his site on the Com- 
mon at 4 o'clock. The Committee had decorated the 
area to provide an appropriate backdrop for "Santa" 



as well as an organized way for the children to see and 
talk with him. ' 'Twinkette' ' the Clown entertained the 
waiting families and music was provided by the Lions 
Club and featured traditional Holiday tunes. 

The Prelude in the Business District consisted of busi- 
nesses being open and giving free "Holiday treats" to 
all who entered their stores and shops. Most of the busi- 
nesses participated. Music in the Center was provided 
by a chorus of volunteers from the high school, a pro- 
fessional bell-ringing group and a brass ensemble of 
local talents. The Byam School Children's Chorus sang 
at the Common at 5: 15 and Selectman Chairman Den- 
nis Ready gave the Town Holiday Message. The tree 
was illuminated at 5:30 with all surrounding churches 
ringing bells. 

The Holiday Decorating Committee has received no 
funds from the Town since 1989 and is funded by volun- 
tary contributions. 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members 

Joan Gauthier, Chairman 

Harold I. Matzkin, Vice Chairman 

John Demers, Clerk 

Angela S. Cosgrove 

James A. Sousa 

Louise Beauchesne, Secretary 

The Personnel Board meets on the second Wednes- 
day of each month at the Town Offices. Special work 
sessions are scheduled when necessary. 

The Personnel Board consists of five members (four 
appointed by the Town Manager and one elected by 
non-union Town employees). 

The Personnel Rules and Regulations were revised, ap- 
proved and adopted this year by the Board in conjunc- 
tion with the Town Manager. This covered such sub- 
jects as: Recruitment and Appointments, Performance 
Appraisals and Benefits. In the upcoming year the Board 
will be working on a new Classification and Compen- 
sation Plan. 

In its role the Personnel Board supports fair, equitable 
personnel practices affecting current Town employees 
and it perpetuates Chelmsford's reputation for attrac- 
ting highly skilled and motivated employees. 



98 



RECREATION COMMISSION 
ANNUAL REPORT 



Ron Zylich 
Robert Hayes 
Michael Ablove 
Robert Charpentier 
Paul Murphy 
Evelyn Newman 
Dennis Sullivan 
Lorraine Murphy 



MEMBERS 

Chairman 
Vice Chairman 



Clerk 



In June of 1991, the Recreation Commission held 
dedication ceremonies and renamed two Chelmsford 
fields, honoring two individuals who have dedicated 
years to the youth of Chelmsford. 

The Mill Road soccer complex has been renamed 
Murphy Field, recognizing Recreation Commission 
Member Paul Murphy for his many years of serving 
Chelmsford. 

Varney Field is now Ayotte Field in honor of Harry 
Ayotte for his long-standing commitment to the 
scheduling and maintenance of this field. 

Like all Town Departments, Recreation again was 
challenged by the budget crunch. Our goal to maintain 
our Summer Programs on a self-supporting basis in 1991 
was realized. 

The Commission hired a very competent staff with 
Ed Keefe as Summer Director. By the end of his first 
summer, Ed had become more confident and did come 
up with some ideas for improving our program. 

Program fees remained the same as 1990, and 
Chelmsford residents again responded positively. The 
registrations were slightly lower than 1990, but were 
enough to remain self supporting. The only area that 
is not self-supporting is the free swim at Freeman Lake. 
It is necessary to have two guards present 7 days a week 
throughout the Summer. 

Our Summer Programs included swimming lessons, 
water adjustment program for 3 & 4 year olds, tennis 
lessons, track and field, Basketball and Volleyball 
Camps, and a very successful Day Camp. An advanc- 
ed tennis program for teenagers depends on the number 
of registrations. 

Recreation again sponsored many not-for-profit sports 
camps, these include Field Hockey, Wrestling, Football, 
Girls Basketball, and Youth Soccer. 

Our Annual Activities Fair has grown and is a conve- 
nient way for parents to register their children in the 
various programs and camps at one place. The cost of 
the Activities Fair is absorbed by a grant from CAD AC 
(Community Alcohol and Drug Awareness Committee) . 



The Fourth of July Pre-Parade Race was another suc- 
cessful project for the Summer of 1991. Financial sup- 
port from Sully's Ice Cream and help from a few local 
runners preserved a long standing Chelmsford tradition, 
the Fourth of July Road Race. 

Our Workreation Volunteer Program was again im- 
plemented in 1991 and was again very helpful. These 
young Chelmsford residents volunteer their time to 
helping in various areas. These youngsters helped in 
beach maintenance, checking residency at the beach, 
and also helped with children in Day Camp. They did 
a terrific job and should be commended for their 
dedication. 



SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

With the defeat of the recycling override, a user fee 
for recycling collection was instituted, in addition to the 
trash user fee. The cost of trash tags was increased to 
$1.15 in FY92, and the cost of the annual bill for trash 
collection was increased to $80.00. The annual bill in- 
cluded the option of joining the voluntary recycling pro- 
gram for an additional $30.00. Participants in the recycl- 
ing program received a large tag for their recycling bin. 

The Solid Waste Advisory Committee, along with the 
Preferred Polystyrene Packaging Partnership, instituted 
a pilot program fo recycling polystyrene at the McCar- 
thy Middle School ever two months. 

The Solid Waste Advisory Committee prepared bid 
specifications for the collection of trash and recycling, 
for the new contracts which will begin July 1, 1992. The 
specifications included multi-family housing complexes. 

Members of the Solid Waste Advisory Committee 
were: Allen Beebe, Catherine Brown, Kathryn 
Chamberlain, Norman Eisenmann, David Turocy, and 
Barbara Scavezze. 



99 



REPORT OF THE 
VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

For the year of 1991 there were no applications receiv- 
ed for assistance by veterans of World War II. Thus there 
were no disbursements from the funds on deposit in 
local banks. 

The total assets of the Veteran's Emergency Fund 
have now reached $16,644.86 through November 30th, 
1991. 

When applications are received they are investigated 
by the Veterans' Agent, and later by members of the 
committee. 

No cash grants are approved but instead payments 
are authorized for vendors who supply utilities, medical 
and doctor and hospital services, food, clothing and 
rent. 

One member who moved away from Chelmsford, Mr. 
Russell E. Starck, resigned during mid-year. We do want 
to thank Mr. Starck for his assistance and willingness 
to serve on the committee for several years. 

Present members: one from each voting precinct, are 
listed as follows: 

Precinct 1: Stephen E.C. Belkakis, D.D.S. 
Precinct 2: Russell E. Butterfield 
Precinct 3: James J. Walker 
Precinct 4: John J. McNulty 
Precinct 5: George F. Waite 
Precinct 6: Alfred H. Coburn 
Precinct 7: Robert T. Clough 
Precinct 8: Thomas F. Balfrey 
Precinct 9: Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 

The Committee Members extend their appreciation 
to the various town officers who have assisted the com- 
mittee in the past. 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 

and the Town Manager 

January 1st, 1991 through December 31st, 1991 



Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1991: 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Interest: 242.82 

The Central Savings Bank, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Interest: 393.37 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings 
Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest 500.76 


$15,507.91 


Total Interest Received: 


1 136 95 


Balance of Hand as of November 30th, 1991 


. $16,644.86 


ASSETS 




Central Savings Bank Account No. 128790 

Central Savings Bank Account No. 2-30-205569 


4,538.68 
... 5,117.80 


Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank Account No. 44-0007431 
Total Assets 


. . . 6,988.38 
$16 644 86 


LIABILITIES 




Less Liabilities: 


None 


Total Assets, Less Liabilities as of December 31, 1991: 


$16,644.86 



Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee, 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



(^Ui^^H k>UH, ttfcJr ^ 100 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointment to Town Committees 103 

Appointed Town Officials 84 

Board of Appeals 95 

Board of Health 67 

Board of Registrars 5 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 96 

Conservation Commission 95 

Cultural Council 96 

Department of Public Works 93 

Dog Officer 92 

Elder Affairs 87 

Emergency Management 92 

Finance Department (Assessors and Treasurer) 89 

Fire Department 87 

General Information 2 

Historic District Commission 97 

Holiday Decorating Committee 97 

Housing Authority 68 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 81 

Personnel Board 97 

Planning Board 71 

Police Department 90 

Police Auxiliary 91 

Public Libraries 69 

Recreation Commission 98 

School Committee 72 

Sewer Commission 83 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 98 

Town Accountant 85 

Town Celebrations 95 

Town Clerk 5 

Special Town Meeting— January 7, 1991 6 

Annual Town Election Warrant— April 2, 1991 10 

Annual Town Meeting Warrant— April 29, 1991 10 

Annual Town Election Results 11 

Annual Town Meeting— April 29, 1991 14 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— April 30, 1991 19 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— May 1, 1991 22 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— May 6, 1991 27 

Special Town Election Warrant— June 4, 1991 52 

Special Town Election Results— June 4, 1991 53 

Annual Town Meeting (Fall Session) Warrant— October 21, 1991 54 

Annual Town Meeting (Fall Session)— October 21, 1991 54 

Representative Town Meeting Members 64 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Town Manager 4 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 99 



NOTES 



NOTES 



103 




OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMFORD, MASS. 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, 
please fill out this form and mail to: Town Manager, Town Offices, 
50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824. The filling out of this 
form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular 
capacity. 

NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE 

ADDRESS AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting 250-5215 

Assessors 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 
Building Inspector 250-5225 

(Yard Sales, Kennel & Bldg. Permits) 

Cemetery .250-5245 

Community Teamwork 459-0551 

Conservation Commission \ . . . .250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 

Council on Aging > 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5265 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

High School 251-8729 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Mass. Electric Co 458-1431 

Park Dept. Garage 256-5073 

Planning Board Clerk 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

(8:30 am-12:30 pm) 

Registry of Deeds (Lowell) 458-8474 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 459-9397 

School Administration 251-4981 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 251-0123 

Water Dept 256-2381 

Welcome Wagon, Billerica 663-4030 

Welfare, Lowell 454-8061 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 

24-hr. Junior Hotline 1-800-792-5117 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1: Town Offices Gym 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 4: Westlands School 
Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: Westlands School 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 9: Town Offices Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
1 202-224-4543 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 

Boston, MA 02116 

362 Russell Office Building 

Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Chester G. Atkins 

1429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, D.C. 20515 
508-459-0101 (Lowell) Post Office 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 36 State House 

Boston, MA 02133 617-722-2552 

Home: 4 Arbutus Ave., Chelmsford, MA 

508-256-5043 

State Senator Lucile C. Hicks 

Room 413G— State House 
Boston, MA 02133 

Middlesex County Commissioners 
Superior Courthouse 494-4100 
East Cambridge, MA 02141